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I think the word "Dismiss" on an improvement request is a bit misleading. I have twice now clicked on it thinking it would dismiss the div that opens up. Should we not call this "Delete" rather than dismiss? At least then I know that clicking it will delete my improvement request.

Dismiss on the other hand could lend itself into users thinking they are dismissing or closing out the div that opens up upon expanding the improvement requests.

enter image description here

Also why don't I see the text I entered when I flagged this example? I don't really care to see the "You can't handle this improvement request because you created it" (which in and of itself reads very odd), reread that sentence two or three times...I'd rather see the custom message I sent for the reviewers to see.

closed as off-topic by peterh, Stephen Rauch, Robert Longson, Code Lღver, HaveNoDisplayName Aug 26 '18 at 0:10

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The problem described here can no longer be reproduced. Changes to the system or to the circumstances affecting the asker have rendered it obsolete. If you encounter a similar problem, please post a new question." – peterh, Stephen Rauch, Robert Longson, Code Lღver, HaveNoDisplayName
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 23
    I'll admit that I initially dismissed some improvement requests thinking I was just dismissing the notification that they existed. – Thriggle Aug 15 '16 at 19:22
  • @Thriggle - Just did it two or three times. In this case delete is much of a stronger word with a stronger message associated with it. It gives the user the notion that hey I'm about to get rid of something and that's very important. – JonH Aug 15 '16 at 19:23
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    The trick there is whether you're deleting the improvement request or the example, especially in the case you'd pictured, where the text says "This example is not helpful and should be edited or deleted". What if they just made it "dismiss request"? – Heretic Monkey Aug 15 '16 at 20:49
  • It would still be misleading even if they said dismiss request. It would be much clearer to say delete request – JonH Aug 15 '16 at 20:50
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    Cancel or Reject might be even stronger, since they imply a judgment targeting the request itself, which is what clicking the link amounts to. Even the polite "Decline" would be preferable, in my opinion. – Thriggle Aug 15 '16 at 21:47
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    @Thriggle: Funny you mention that. Mods have "decline" for post flags and "dismiss" for comment flags (which marks them - you guessed it - declined). – BoltClock Aug 16 '16 at 4:37
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    I like 'decline' for this, though even with 'dismiss' it would not be that confusing it it would ask you to motivate – JVApen Aug 16 '16 at 4:48
  • What about placing the dismiss somewhere else, or make it a button. Even if it reads cancel it is still quite close to the div. – Trilarion Aug 16 '16 at 6:53
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    I asked about this in the beta too (I'd link if I could find how to get to the beta site?). The word just implies a totally different severity than it should. – SuperBiasedMan Aug 16 '16 at 8:28
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    When a window with a "dismiss" button pops up that button means you are dismissing the window itself (as a visual element), not deleting the underlying piece of data it represents. So this is absolutely right, that wording lead to an incorrect assumption of what is going to happen when you click it. – Jimbo Jonny Aug 16 '16 at 20:05
  • Now that multiple individuals need to click "dismiss" in order to decline an improvement request, the true irony is that the "dismissed" notification is visible indefinitely (pending the accrual of sufficient dismissals), adding no value and with no way for you to hide it or otherwise act on it. ...If only there were some way to dismiss the notification for an improvement request that you've dismissed. :P – Thriggle Sep 19 '16 at 20:23

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