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Currently, the documentation for HTML includes 6 versions: 1.0, 2.0, 3.2, 4.0, 4.01, and 5. I wanted to write documentation for the <ruby> tag, which is used for displaying pronunciation annotations above text in East Asian languages like this:

日本語 annotated with ruby text as にほんご

Unfortunately, there are a number of competing standards which describe how the <ruby> tag should work, all with different levels of browser support. There are at least two non-deprecated standards:

So the question that I have is how to appropriately document the versions that each feature applies to. This question is really two-fold:

  • How do we document versions which are produced by two competing standards organizations? Should WHATWG be added to the HTML versions list?
  • How do we document actual browser support for features in the standards? As far as I know no browser has implemented all of the W3C ruby text standard, although Firefox is closest.

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6

Currently, the documentation for HTML includes 6 versions: 1.0, 2.0, 3.2, 4.0, 4.01, and 5.

That's irrelevant. HTML is supposed to be backwards compatible all the way back to version 1.0. WHATWG prefers you designate it as HTML (not HTML5). There's very little reason to distinguish HTML versions as all browsers are supposed to handle invalid/outdated documents in a sane way. It's only useful when comparing HTML4 to HTML5 IMO.

Source: WHATWG FAQ

What is HTML5?

Going forward, the WHATWG is just working on "HTML", without worrying about version numbers. When people talk about HTML5 in the context of the WHATWG, they usually mean just "the latest work on HTML", not necessarily a specific version. For more details, see the section called "Is this HTML5?" in the specification.

Will future browsers have any idea what older HTML documents mean?

Browsers do not implement HTML+, HTML2, HTML3.2 HTML4, HTML4.01, etc, as separate versions. They all just have a single implementation that covers all these versions at once. That is what the WHATWG HTML specification defines: how to write a browser (or other implementation) that handles all previous versions of HTML, as well as all the latest features.

One of the main goals of the HTML specification and the WHATWG effort as a whole is to make it possible for archeologists hundreds of years from now to write a browser and view HTML content, regardless of when it was written. Making sure that we handle all documents is one of our most important goals. Not having versions does not preclude this; indeed it makes it significantly easier.


  • How do we document versions which are produced by two competing standards organizations? Should WHATWG be added to the HTML versions list?

  • How do we document actual browser support for features in the standards? As far as I know no browser has implemented all of the W3C ruby text standard, although Firefox is closest.

This is covered by the WHATWG FAQ:

Are there plans to merge the groups?

No. The two groups have different goals. The WHATWG spec is intended to describe what browsers should aim for, introducing new features and describing reality in as much, and as accurate, detail as possible. The W3C spec is intended to follow the W3C process to REC.

On the WHATWG side, the editors read the feedback sent to both groups and take all input into account — and indeed there are far more places where input on HTML is sent than just these two mailing lists (e.g. blogs, www-html@w3.org, forums, direct mail, meetings, etc). (In particular, the editors do not look at the source of technical arguments when attempting to determine what path to take on an issue or other.)

Which group has authority in the event of a dispute?

The two groups have different specs, so each has authority over its spec. The specs can and have diverged on some topics; unfortunately, these differences are not documented anywhere.

Isn't it bad that the specs have forked?

Yes. The WHATWG originally committed to remaining consistent with the W3C spec unless the W3C working group showed a lapse in judgement. When that (in Hixie's opinion) occurred, there was little choice left but to let the specs diverge.

The plan to get the specs to converge again, such as it is, is to just do a better job with the WHATWG spec, such that it becomes the logical and obvious choice for anyone wanting to figure out which spec they should use.

With there being "no true authority" (unlike ISO standards) and the specs constantly changing to meet market and vendor demands, there's very little reason IMO to have Documentation conform to specific HTML specifications. It's much more useful to developers to see what spec browsers support and how the tag is used in real life. For all you know, support for the tag could drop the next day or never be fully implemented. If that was the case, it's likely the tag will become deprecated.

Just keep it simple.

To clarify, I am talking specifically about HTML as opposed to C++ or Java.

  • How would you handle documenting current browser support? For ruby text specifically, Firefox supports much more complex markup than Chrome does, and that seems unlikely to change in the near future. It seems limiting to only document the subset which they both support well. – Will Kunkel Aug 13 '16 at 18:40
  • WHATWG have taken to referring to the current version of HTML as "HTML LS" to differentiate it from older versions; LS meaning Living Standard. The W3C just continues with numbering: 5.1, 5.2 etc. – Mr Lister Aug 14 '16 at 7:49
  • 1
    As for the documented differences in specs between them W3C and the WHATWG, there is a fairly official looking piece here: w3.org/html/landscape/… – Mr Lister Aug 14 '16 at 8:05

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