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The documentation reputation system is, well, not so great. Users are trying to farm reputation by making a very small edit on a very popular example, and then they simply wait for the upvotes to start rolling in.

The current system:

Currently, an upvote on an example you contributed to gives you +5 reputation. No matter how helpful or substantial your edit was, you still get +5 reputation per upvote. So a user may make a very minor edit, or a user may greatly improve the example, but they both get the same reward for their contributions: +5 rep per upvote.

How to improve this system:

Reputation gained per upvote on an example you contributed to will depend on how substantial/helpful the edit was and how much of the edit is remaining in the current revision.

How do we decide how substantial/helpful an edit is? If a user has less than 2K reputation (no edit privilege), reviewers can now rate how helpful the edit is on a scale of 1 to 10. The average "helpfulness rating" of a revision will be how much reputation a user earns per upvote on the edited example. What about users with more than 2K reputation (has edit privilege)? How substantial/helpful the edit was will be based on the percentage of characters changed in the edit.

The amount of reputation a user earns for each upvote on an example they contributed to will also depend on how much of the edit is remaining in the current revision. If someone completely overwrites your edit, you shouldn't earn any more reputation from it (because it's no longer there), right?

This'll definitely stop the rep farming (and reward people who make helpful and substantial edits)!

closed as off-topic by pnuts, jhpratt, Stephen Rauch, il_raffa, Nissa Nov 8 '18 at 0:44

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The problem described here can no longer be reproduced. Changes to the system or to the circumstances affecting the asker have rendered it obsolete. If you encounter a similar problem, please post a new question." – pnuts, jhpratt, Stephen Rauch, il_raffa, Nissa
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    How do you determine what is a substantial edit? If your edit is fixing formatting and possibly rearranging the order of the content a lot will change but is it substantial? – Joe W Aug 11 '16 at 21:02
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    I'm not sure how effective the rating scale will be. Many reviewers seem to have trouble rejecting even blatantly wrong edits. Even good reviewers may have trouble deciding how "good" an edit is (I would). And then, how does one deal with differing opinions of reviewers? I feel like it would be an invasion of the anonymity of the voting system a little. – Laurel Aug 11 '16 at 21:11
  • "This'll definitely stop the rep farming" - Yeah, by killing the Documentation project. Well done on yet another crap idea – Alon Eitan Aug 12 '16 at 3:42
  • @AlonEitan How will this kill documentation? – clickbait Aug 12 '16 at 3:42
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    reviewers can now rate how helpful the edit is on a scale of 1 to 10, as if those 2-3 random users will be qualified enough to decide that correctly rate it based on some vague/abstract unknown factors that eventually should define how helpful any change is – Alon Eitan Aug 12 '16 at 3:55
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    @AlonEitan Also, Imagine the infernal amount of bickering on meta a'la "why'd you rate this so low?" Its already happening with votes, if we give these votes a 10 point granularity the moaning will only multiply. – Magisch Aug 12 '16 at 6:13
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Reputation gained per upvote on an example you contributed to will depend on how substantial/helpful the edit was and how much of the edit is remaining in the current revision.

Thats a bad idea for multiple reasons. First, it encourages people to make superflous changes affecting as much of any given example as possible. Second, it punishes users who contributed the majority of the "thought work" (read: the actual code and logic) if they did so early and other users reformat/refurbish it a bit.

This would further encourage users who have contributed to an example to deliberately reject edits changing their part of it - irrespective of the merits of these edits.

How do we decide how substantial/helpful an edit is? If a user has less than 2K reputation (no edit privilege), reviewers can now rate how helpful the edit is on a scale of 1 to 10.

That would be insanely subjective. And it would invite a whole lot of strife a'la "Why did you only rate this a 4?".

If someone completely overwrites your edit, you shouldn't earn any more reputation from it (because it's no longer there), right?

Its the same problem as with the first statement. How do you count "completly overwritten"? I could post some code of an example, and you could change every character of it, but the logic could remain and its arguably still my code. Judging this kind of stuff in a way that remains fair to users and doesn't encourage bad behavior is pretty much unfeasible.

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    I can think of other impossible-to-handle scenarios raised as a result of the OP's suggestion, but what you described is more than enough to dismiss this bad idea – Alon Eitan Aug 12 '16 at 6:40

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