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TL;DR: Discuss/propose methods to promote good links in addition to upvoting answers.

Discussion

Should there be a badge or some other award for good answers that provide links to primary sources as a means to encourage more rigorous research from OPs prior to posting?

The help page: How to write a good answer states (emphasis mine):

Provide context for links

Links to external resources are encouraged, but please add context around the link so your fellow users will have some idea what it is and why it’s there. Always quote the most relevant part of an important link, in case the target site is unreachable or goes permanently offline.

My issue is that too often I see either one extreme or the other:

  • link only answers
  • answers with no links to official documentation

The discussion I've read regarding this question seems to focus only on the widespread disapproval of link-only answers:

So far I haven't found a conversation about the answers that lack any links to primary sources at all. This is troubling to me. I see stack overflow and affiliated sites not just as a repository of just any question and answer, but as both the launching point for deeper inquiry when first researching an issue and the site of last resort in the situations where I fail to find any official documentation or secondary tutorials at all.

In the case of the former, whenever I enter search terms into Google it returns a slew of SO postings. Although I often review some of these results to to see if they have any insight, I nearly always skip them in favor of a primary source of documentation. Usually some combination of SO answers, primary and secondary sources are sufficient to determine the best approach to resolve the issue.

Only in a few cases, I have I found the need to actually post a question, because I simply could not find enough information from any sources to solve the problem. Many times, I have found a stack overflow or other Stack Exchange site answer to a question that someone else posted because they were in the same dilemma as me - an issue with insufficient, vague or incomprehensible documentation.

Therefore I think it is crucial that SO reward answers that encourage users to actually do this kind of research before posting. Nobody benefits from of glut of duplicate questions and answers that could have easily been resolved by reading the manual. If there are no links to the official documentation, then there may be less chance that users will consult the documentation when faced with their next question. In fact it's possible that by not citing the official documentation, we're training users to just post all of their questions, without any research at all. That would definitely be counterproductive.

Proposals

  1. Automatic bonus of +5 points for any answer that links to SO Documentationβ with any of the same tags as the posted question.

  2. Scrape all links from each answer and place them after the comments for up-votes just like comments, so no rep, and then hide the links with the lowest or zero up-votes. Perhaps track how often each link is clicked as well as the bounce rate of each clicked link and use that to filter the link list more somehow.

  3. Add a dedicated field called something like "reference", "official documentation", "primary source" or "SO Documentationβ". This field could be empty. Then either use current up/down votes system, automatically credit any link, or allow links to up-voted like comments.

  4. Similar to 3, enable a way to allow referencing in addition to links. References would show up in the answer as superscripts, and links as footnotes. Then either use current up/down votes system, automatically credit any link, or allow links to up-voted like comments.

Please consider either posting your discussion or proposal as an answer or comment below.

closed as off-topic by pnuts, Nissa, peterh, HaveNoDisplayName, Stephen Rauch Sep 13 '18 at 1:59

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The problem described here can no longer be reproduced. Changes to the system or to the circumstances affecting the asker have rendered it obsolete. If you encounter a similar problem, please post a new question." – pnuts, Nissa, peterh, HaveNoDisplayName, Stephen Rauch
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    What mechanism would you propose to identify links to "original documentation" as compared to other links that might be useful? Should I link a CSS question to the CSS Specification or MDN...which is better?...and in who's opinion!? – Paulie_D Aug 11 '16 at 9:36
  • What would you recommend? Linking to the most useful primary source would be part of what would qualify a good link. Maybe there should be a dedicated field for link to relavent section of primary source. Me personally I always prefer Mozilla developer network over for example w3s. But there could be secondary sources as well. – Mark Mikofski Aug 11 '16 at 14:52
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    It's entirely question dependent. My question to YOU is "How is SO supposed to know the sources are 'good' / 'bad' / 'primary' or whatever?". Basically, good well researched answers with quotes and citations [with links] rise to the top over time better than poor ones...and that's what we want. At SO, cr@p sinks. – Paulie_D Aug 11 '16 at 14:57
  • The users vote. – Mark Mikofski Aug 11 '16 at 15:20
  • Fair enough, but I wanted more encouragement. – Mark Mikofski Aug 11 '16 at 15:21
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    s/original/official or cannon/ – Braiam Aug 11 '16 at 18:24