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I have edited an outdated answer, and my edit got rejected because it does not preserve the goals of the post's owner.

However, my edit just fixed the answer with removing the outdated part (which was not valid anymore). I did not change the main point of the answer. Is it possible that someone explain it to me?

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  • 10
    you didn't "fix" it, you made it only work for certain versions...
    – Kevin B
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:18
  • @KevinB, that is not true. Please check the XMLHttpRequest document in w3.
    – Arashsoft
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:19
  • @yellowantphil, I removed the part which is not valid anymore.
    – Arashsoft
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:27
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    @Arashsoft It's not valid in certain contexts in which that issues has been fixed. It's still entirely valid for lots of old software out there. An edit to indicate for what versions the issue no longer applies, due to a recent fix, would be a fine edit, but to remove it because the newest versions of a product no longer have that problem isn't appropriate.
    – Servy
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:27
  • i'm fairly certain that this particular case was a cross-browser problem, one that jQuery fixed after 1.5, but i can't find any reference to back that up. I do know though that 1.4.2 in modern chrome correctly uses readyState.
    – Kevin B
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:32
  • @KevinB, Yes, and I checked the oldest version of W3 document (05 April 2006). It used "readyState" correctly. It means I removed the wrong part of answer. But nobody listen to me.
    – Arashsoft
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:36
  • @Servy, The answer mentions that w3 document were using not capitalized "readystate". It is completely wrong and W3 never used it. Also, Jquery correctly match the W3 specification.
    – Arashsoft
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:40
  • I've switched on this particular example. The question, in it's current form, is confusing. the code at the top no longer uses readystate and instead uses readyState, thanks to an edit made back in april. Removing the jquery 1.5 note would make the question clear once again, just like reverting the previous edit would. But i think removing the 1.5 note would be more appropriate.
    – Kevin B
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:43
  • @KevinB, Thank you. Someone finally got my point.
    – Arashsoft
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:47
  • 1
    Related meta.stackexchange.com/questions/261817/…
    – Braiam
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:51
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    Do anyone notice that the part OP is trying to remove wasn't added by the answerer either? stackoverflow.com/posts/4551178/revisions
    – Braiam
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:54
  • @Braiam looks like an inappropriate edit in the first place, should have been a comment.
    – JAL
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:57
  • I can't even figure out which browser could have had this problem. It wasn't IE,
    – Kevin B
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:59
  • @JAL no, JAL, this site is built over the colaborative editing, editing is actively encouraged: If you see something that needs improvement, click edit! The edit to add it made sense then, like a new edit makes sense now to remove it.
    – Braiam
    Aug 10 '16 at 22:05
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    Quote: "Approved 43 mins ago". Something really is broken about this, smells like somebody get fed up with the constant complaints about rejected edits. Aug 10 '16 at 23:00
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Any time you're editing an answer to change the content of that answer, whether code or prose, you should evaluate if your revision should be an edit, or an additional answer. You need to be careful editing other users' answers, you don't want to put words in their mouth.

Alternatively, you can comment under the user's answer explaining what portion of their answer is outdated and no longer necessary for the library version you are using.

In this particular case, even editing out an outdated portion of that answer is modifying the OPs original answer. As I've pointed out in the comments, the most appropriate thing to do is to add a comment explaining what that you did not need the outdated portion of the answer to solve your specific issue.

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  • I did not change the content of answer. I just removed the wrong part. The answer is exactly same as what it was.
    – Arashsoft
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:52
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    @Arashsoft Right, so add a comment below their answer explaining what part of this answer is unnecessary for the version you are using.
    – JAL
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:52
  • Yes , I did it.
    – Arashsoft
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:53
  • 1
    @Arashsoft great, congrats! You're done.
    – JAL
    Aug 10 '16 at 21:53
  • Your answer isn't accurate, he isn't editing OP original answer but an addition made by someone else.
    – Braiam
    Aug 11 '16 at 14:13
  • I already some post edited for their outdated solution. The outdated part don't get removed, instead a warning text is added saying that this answer works for the version before X. And eventually another paragraph is added for the newer versions. So you have all informations in one answer.
    – Walfrat
    Aug 11 '16 at 14:24
0

Note: the author of the answer was last seen about a hour ago and didn't rolled back the changes, which makes this discussion moot, as it implicitly accepted the edit.

If we are going to reject edits because they are... err... substantial improvements then we shouldn't allow anyone but the OP to edit their post ever.

The edit you are doing removes something that wasn't even originally written by the author of the answer, and was meant as "compatibility note". Well, we are now in jquery 3.1.0, over 20 versions later, do the compatibility note makes sense anymore, almost 5 years later? I would say no... in fact the most substantial edit was a single character edit that changed readystate to readyState, which actually changes what OP thought was working since then.

Recommended read: Is it OK to edit the question to change the author's intention tl;dr: nobody cares about intention, but respect.

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  • "through was working since then" needs an edit. But I might change the intention. Aug 10 '16 at 23:33
  • I'm sure everybody knew that I meant "the product of mental activity", @hans, you could have fixed my slight typo instead...
    – Braiam
    Aug 10 '16 at 23:43
  • Last seen an hour ago does not mean they had time to review/take action on the edit.
    – Joe W
    Aug 11 '16 at 14:41
  • @JoeW how so? If they don't agree with the edit, which has been applied, the author can roll back
    – Braiam
    Aug 11 '16 at 14:52
  • I understand they can roll it back. However what if they are checking in on the mobile app and do not have time to fully review and roll back the edit? Just because they are 'Online' doesn't mean they have time/focus to do much on the site.
    – Joe W
    Aug 11 '16 at 14:55

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