-14

Sometimes, like in this SO question, high rep users are sooooo fast with the downvotes - they may be correct, but they are so fast that we don't even have time to edit our shit - that it discourages the new user who asked the question, as well as those who try to answer.

Look at the comments. Does it look like a friendly community or a fight among bounty hunters?

I can't figure how to set guideline to improve this attitude that I noticed many times, mainly from high rep users.

Sure, a totally out of scope answer needs to be downvoted. But it seems there is something missing for the grey zone between a perfect answer and a totally dumb answer.

So I ask you, why are "grey area" questions downvoted so harshly and quickly?

marked as duplicate by Paul Roub, user6263819, πάντα ῥεῖ, Enamul Hassan, Bill the Lizard discussion Aug 7 '16 at 0:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • @PaulRoub: Naaa... It is a different question. But maybe you'll find a duplicate dating from times before I was born (lol) Still, the problem is actual and needs reflexion. – Louys Patrice Bessette Aug 6 '16 at 22:11
  • 3
    Any reason you edited the spelling errors back in to this question? – Paul Roub Aug 6 '16 at 22:14
  • 1
    (seems like you'd at least want "downvote" spelled correctly in the title) Regardless, it's your question. I'll leave you to it. – Paul Roub Aug 6 '16 at 22:15
  • 1
    Sorry... I thought I was rolling back the "duplicate" mention. Your spelling corrections were right. – Louys Patrice Bessette Aug 6 '16 at 22:17
  • So... I understand that the community isn't interested in this reflexion. This can be an answer.... Sadly. – Louys Patrice Bessette Aug 6 '16 at 22:18
  • 5
    a bounty hunters fight what is it always with this nonsense about how people downvote for reputation gain. The best way to gain reputation would be to answer the question. – Pekka 웃 Aug 6 '16 at 22:18
  • 8
    Just to take you through a bit of a process here regarding downvotes: I go to the front page and see this post titled "Downwvote attitude". Clearly the OP wasn't able to correctly write a title. Not a good start. Ah, it got edited ... oh, but was done so correctly and then rolled back. But the OP did write the word correctly in other parts of his post. So it must just be laziness I guess. Almost 40 minutes old and can't be bothered to correct the most important part of the post ... So your apprehension may have been correct. You haven't given it your best, and left a poor first impression. – Bart Aug 6 '16 at 22:38
  • 1
    @Bart to be fair, the rollback may have been an innocent mistake. There's only 2 mins between them. – Pekka 웃 Aug 6 '16 at 22:44
  • Suggested an edit to the title – Pekka 웃 Aug 6 '16 at 22:45
  • 1
    Could be. I'm not sure it is @Pekka웃, but you have only 1 shot at a first impression. If you're going to complain you don't even have the "time to edit our shit", you're always going to run after yourself. – Bart Aug 6 '16 at 22:47
  • 2
    @Pekka웃 I didn't read the bounty hunters fight remark to mean anything related to reputation gain; it sounded to me to be more like a colorful way to say that a bunch of badasses looking to put the hurt on someone as quickly as possible. Maybe something like vigilante would be a more apt description? – Michael Gaskill Aug 6 '16 at 22:48
17

but soo fast we don't even have time to edit our shit

That's why it's important to polish a post into the best possible post you can achieve right from the start.

The example you mention is a typical "hey this code doesn't work" question. You need to do better than that if you want a good reception on this site: get the basics about debugging, how to look into the JavaScript console, et cetera.

That's unfortunate from a certain point of view, but it's the way it is.

Yes, downvotes can ruin a question completely, and often no amount of editing will get it out of the hole even when it turns into something great.

That takes away a lot of the incentive to learn what's wrong with your question, and fix it.

Often, there is no alternative but to abandon ship, and give up on the question.

That sucks, but blame that on the system, not the voters.

Voters are expected and encouraged to vote on the post immediately, as it currently is the moment they see it.

There is no mechanism (nor any encouragement) to do things like hold off a vote (we can not see whether a post is currently being edited or not), or come back and "fix" a vote if a post has been improved in quality.

That's a philosophical decision that was made a long time ago.

The idea is that voting is supposed to be instantaneous, and that any voting imbalance (like a lot of downvotes, or a changed situation after an edit) will be balanced out by future eyeballs that see the question.

I'm not sure this is a good thing, as it leads to frustrating situations for new users and I feel sorry for them.

Overall, though, from the system's point of view with its 12,000+ new questions every day, there's a strong argument that it works ok: the ecosystem has some semblance of quality control through these votes.

The thing to take away is that when a question of yours runs into this kind of feedback, find out why exactly it was so badly received; then make the next question a better one.

  • You're in phase with my topic. Ok well... The system. Isn't Meta the right place to discuss it or am I wrong ? – Louys Patrice Bessette Aug 6 '16 at 22:24
  • 1
    Sure. Just don't expect any changes to the system. We have no power in that regard. – Pekka 웃 Aug 6 '16 at 22:27
  • 1
    If nobody asks.. nothing will happen for sure. – Louys Patrice Bessette Aug 6 '16 at 22:27
  • 1
    I can tell you from many years of Meta experience that if somebody asks, nothing will happen either. :) But yes, it's the right place – Pekka 웃 Aug 6 '16 at 22:30
  • For the record... I didn't intent to spot on particular users. This question I mentioned is the perfect example. But Yeah... My intend is to discuss about the "system". – Louys Patrice Bessette Aug 6 '16 at 22:31
  • 2
    Your post doesn't come across that way, though (which is likely why it's not being received well). You're pretty much saying that "high ranked users" downvote out of greed, or for coolness and fun. – Pekka 웃 Aug 6 '16 at 22:32
  • 2
    I downvote for the streetcred. – Bart Aug 6 '16 at 22:33
  • Well, I may be wrong... But I think this behavior is more common to "high ranked" than newbee. That's why. And Sorry if I let suppose they have fun to downvote. I want to discuss about something «restraining» downvote like an obligation to comment... Which would be a start.... Something like this. – Louys Patrice Bessette Aug 6 '16 at 22:36
  • 4
    @Louys it's pretty logical that downvoting would be more common to users with higher "rank": they have more experience here, are familiar with the site's culture and rules, have seen a lot of low quality questions and are sick of them to some degree, are likely to be professionals with limited time, and they care about the place. – Pekka 웃 Aug 6 '16 at 22:37
  • 1
    @Loyus that's been suggested, many many many times, and always rejected. The main argument is that a comment obligation is trivial to circumvent (asdassdasdfs), comments on downvoted content often lead to huge unnecessary conflicts, and it would be a massive slow-down on the quality control I talk about above. Remember that Stack Overflow sees 12,000+ new questions every day. – Pekka 웃 Aug 6 '16 at 22:39
  • @Pekka웃: I understand that... And I agree. But anything to prevent users from playing the bad cop role? – Louys Patrice Bessette Aug 6 '16 at 22:39
  • 2
    Regarding the "obligation to comment", I would advise you to look through old posts and proposals on that very topic. We've had that discussion, had it again, and then redid it a bit more. It's not worth trying that one again. It isn't going to happen. – Bart Aug 6 '16 at 22:39
  • @Bart: I will... Thanks. – Louys Patrice Bessette Aug 6 '16 at 22:40
  • 3
    @Louys anything to prevent users from playing the bad cop role you mean to force all users to provide their feedback to questions with problems in a tone that is clearly and unmistakably nice, rather than curt and sometimes right-out rude? So far, no one has found the solution to that problem. I suggested this once, for what it's worth – Pekka 웃 Aug 6 '16 at 22:41
  • 2
    I understand now that this is a very old topic not putted to side... But real hard to address. Ok then. Thank you all. If I have a magic idea, I will come back here to suggest. – Louys Patrice Bessette Aug 6 '16 at 22:46

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .