10

I have been reading a lot about questions and answers lately, partly because I have been a little bit more involved in the site, partly because of particular issues with my own questions&answers.

I reckon that the general lines are:

  1. The community votes-up the good posts. The community votes-down the bad posts. This gives you hints on quality.

  2. If you get a post down-voted, you kind of know that you have to edit (deleting is discouraged). If you're lucky, you get comments on what to do. That is not always the case, though.

  3. Since you're assertive and want to help / get helped, and you respect others' comments, you reword/edit/format/expand/massage your post.

So far, so good. Quality goes up again. Do the scores go up again as well? With no infos or stats, I tend to think that low-scored posts get even more down-voted. Can it be true or is just an impression of mine? I wouldn't think that people voting down ever come back to see if there was an actual effect out of their vote.

Do posts having negative scores ever get positive ones again?

I have also seen a couple of posts here in meta, pointing out to a downvoted question, which I then look at, seeing it with a positive score. A question in meta brings awareness to a post in the Q&A site and get you upvoted again (I tend upvote in such cases too). Is this the correct path to get your improvements acknowledged?

Is downvoting a way to raise awareness to improve posts or a way to remove bad ones?

  • 3
    Unfortunately, downvoters don't usually stick around after downvoting a question to see if it improves (nor is it reasonable to expect them to I think). IMO people should be encouraged to upvote downvoted questions, if the question has been edited to address complaints left in the comments (e.g. by adding code). However, the best solution is just to get it right the first time, or failing that to apply lessons learned into your next question. – samgak Jul 28 '16 at 6:10
  • 1
    "Do posts having negative scores ever get positive ones again?", yes, if you really can salvage and fix it. I answered a -5 question which was then closed as off-topic. After salvaging the question, the question is now on positive score. Yes, the downvotes are still there, but future users can still upvote it. – Andrew T. Jul 28 '16 at 6:11
  • Link to the post on meta after it's been improved. – clickbait Aug 28 '16 at 19:13
9

I can tell you that poorly tagged posts don't generally get the visibility that they need to recover from a few downvotes. If you've got and but failed to attract the attention of the people that actually use the framework you're using, you just won't get enough visibility.

Even reviewers that look for posts that could benefit from some help (even if that help is just an upvote or so to help an improved post on its way) use tags granularly to drill down into topic matter in which they have some expertise and interest.

Lesson: Fix tags first!

Look at your title, how many truly unique words does it contain? Is it going to grasp the attention of someone that's likely to find some interest in giving you an answer (and possibly a vote?). "Problem sorting list" is a horrible title. "Why does my sorting algorithm run so slow with multi-byte characters?" is a good title.

Titles are really, really hard to get right. It's your one shot to say "this question is probably more fun to answer than the others you're contemplating right now."

Lesson: Fix titles second!

If the view count moves more than 'just a little' after you've edited, and the post still isn't attracting upvotes, maybe you need to look for other ways in which it can be improved. But, sometimes, people just don't think that certain questions even if they were perfectly written are useful artifacts.

So, if you're not getting any traction with upvotes but you're getting good answers, it's probably because the question is perfectly understandable but many find the premise itself a bit unremarkable.

Lesson: Not all questions move people to upvote, even if they're clear.

Additional things you can do:

  • Did someone point something out in comments? Thank them in a @reply, and ask them if they think your edit improved what they noticed. Remember - it might be a few days before that user comes back, this isn't an 'instant' thing.

  • Did someone give you a great answer and it's obvious that they understood your question? Let them know it helped, and ask them if they found any part of your question difficult to parse. Don't go asking for upvotes, ask for feedback.

  • Be okay with "this is probably as good as this question is going to get" as you gain experience using the site, and put what you learned to work on your next question.

  • Is there a chat room associated with your language or framework? Try going there and first ask if there's anyone that would mind giving you some feedback on your question. If someone says yes, then post the link. But don't do this until you've fixed everything you can.

  • I think all answers are really good but I really like the extra ideas here (ask in chat, directly ask-for-feedback). They are a plus over "you'll get better with time" and "make a super gold edit". – Luis Jul 31 '16 at 11:59
4

With no infos or stats, I tend to think that low-scored posts get even more down-voted.

It's hard to come up with statistical evidence for this, as for up- and downvotes in SEDE only the date is stored, not the time. But I have seen this 'gang-voting' phenomenon on numerous occasions as well, especially on questions (as downvotes on questions don't cost the voter any reputation). On answers, it is rarer. An edit on a downvoted post needs to improve the post a lot, otherwise the resulted 'bumping' of the question will bring more attention to it, with the risk of more downvotes. So, take for example an unclear question with bad grammar. If it is edited to make the question clear, people might still downvote it for the grammar (or vice versa).

I wouldn't think that people voting down ever come back to see if there was an actual effect out of their vote.

Yes, this happens rarely. Some users favorite the questions they downvote exactly for this purpose, but it's rare. A feature request has been proposed to make this more easy, but it is not implemented yet.

A question in meta brings awareness to a post in the Q&A site and get you upvoted again

I would not recommend this. Imagine that we got a Meta topic for every time this happens; that would dwarf even the current flood of Documentation questions.

However, the best solution is just to get it right the first time, or failing that to apply lessons learned into your next question.

This comment from @samgak hits the nail on the head. Maybe your first two questions or answers get downvotes; that means you made a mistake. Even experienced users make them (proof). Don't be discouraged and try to learn from them.

  • 3
    We're looking at ways to better surface "Hey, that thing you downvoted yesterday got a substantial edit, wanna go see?" in a manner that isn't noisy and irritating. Missing that is what exacerbates this. – Tim Post Jul 28 '16 at 7:25
  • @TimPost I'd say that needs to trigger on content that you've (recently?) voted on being edited, not specifically downvoted. People might also want to reverse upvotes, or even rollback. – Gimby Jul 28 '16 at 8:52
  • that means you made a mistake I was not only thinking on [my own] mistakes, but rather on the underlying question If something is wrong, should I try to fix it at all? – Luis Jul 31 '16 at 12:02
3

I'm cherry picking some things to respond to as this question goes several places.

"So far, so good. Quality goes up again."

Well that's the general idea, but it is not a guarantee that you've made it better. Getting no upvotes or even getting further downvotes may just be for another reason than what you're trying to imply here. A valid reason where the responsibility is still with you.

"I tend to think that low-scored posts get even more down-voted. Can it be true or is just an impression of mine?"

Both. Yes some people vote like a sheep; if it is downvoted, another downvote. If it is upvoted, another upvote. And others do not. You can't generalize the behavior of a massive user base such as SO - basically whatever you come up with happens in some way or another.

"I wouldn't think that people voting down ever come back to see if there was an actual effect out of their vote."

I don't know numbers, but I reckon many don't, no. And here is the kicker - they don't have to. See you don't vote on the quality of the end product, you vote on the content at the time. It is not the burden of the downvoter that the downvote is there, any implication that it should be is false.

However by editing you push the content back into activity where a person who previously downvoted might see it again and choose to reverse his vote. That would be the ideal situation, not the likely situation. There are also a number of people that spit through their voting history and go back to look - bless their souls they're willing to take the time and effort.

But if that doesn't happen and you don't receive upvotes to counter the downvotes you must still ask yourself why that is. It might be that you're posting in an obscure tag in which case there really isn't much you can do, but assuming you're posting in a high traffic tag: I'd rather come to meta asking what you can still further improve.

"Do posts having negative scores ever get positive ones again?"

Heck yes. All the time. I've seen content rise from -20 to +40 and up, but that's very rare.

"A question in meta brings awareness to a post in the Q&A site and get you upvoted again"

Its called the meta effect, and it can work the other way around too. I've seen particular answers net over a hundred downvotes because of it. That's the risk you run by posting a link to content on meta - you put it up for mass scrutiny and there is nothing you can do to stop it - nor should you be able to stop it because voting is everyone's Stack-given anonymous freedom.

"Is this the correct path to get your improvements acknowledged?"

Most definitely Not. Meta is a discussion platform and a place to report bugs in the site, not to put people to work. The meta effect should only happen by coincidence. Nobody can stop you from trying, but beware that most meta regulars have eagle eyes and very sharp memories.

"Is downvoting a way to raise awareness to improve posts or a way to remove bad ones?"

Its a way to rate content. What happens after that is the subject of other site functionalities. In essence its yes to both.


long story short:

The correct path is to create good content from the very beginning. As soon as you enter a situation where you netted several downvotes, effort and luck involved to get it into the positive again rises quite a lot. It is most definitely possible, but you will likely have to edit the content such that it sparkles and shines. That is a skill in itself, meta has quite a lot of guidance regarding the subject already, and if you sort listings by votes you might see some stellar examples to copycat from.

  • Holy cow we both wrote novels :P – Tim Post Jul 28 '16 at 7:07
  • @TimPost I'm joining the club ... – Glorfindel Jul 28 '16 at 7:11
  • 1
    @timpost figures, I decide to write some prose and then the two meta masters are there to ninja me :) – Gimby Jul 28 '16 at 7:18
  • 1
    You've got good stuff here that we missed. I think this turned out really well, and it's a topic that keeps coming up. Between the three of us I think we've nailed it. – Tim Post Jul 28 '16 at 7:23

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .