5

The issue

Right now, it is only possible on non-approved proposals to ping people who actually commented.

Now there are three scenarios:

  • My change proposal happened to be rejected. I now want to be able to ask the reviewers for more detail (e.g. if I do not understand the rejection reason).
  • I come across an already rejected/approved (or casted myself the last review vote). I want to be able to discuss the approval or rejection because I disagree and would like to know why they reviewed that way before I rollback or resubmit the proposal.
  • I just was discussing something with the proposer and someone else suddenly cuts my discussion off by approving the change. I'd like to be able to continue my discussion.

(See also: What is the general procedure to appeal a rejected edit to documentation?)

Proposed solution

It would be helpful to ping the reviewers [so that they also notice me commenting].

Additionally, comments on approved proposals shall still be allowed (as mentioned above, to ask them why they approved / to continue discussions).

There also should be a time limit [like @Nicol Bolas proposed] of a few days (at most a week), to prevent random pings from long rejected proposals.

closed as off-topic by pnuts, Nissa, Stephen Rauch, HaveNoDisplayName, Michael Gaskill Sep 14 '18 at 5:49

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The problem described here can no longer be reproduced. Changes to the system or to the circumstances affecting the asker have rendered it obsolete. If you encounter a similar problem, please post a new question." – pnuts, Nissa, Stephen Rauch, HaveNoDisplayName, Michael Gaskill
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

-2

My change proposal happened to be rejected. I now want to be able to ask the reviewers for more detail (e.g. if I do not understand the rejection reason).

I can't think of a better way to keep people from reviewing posts than to tell them that rejecting a change opens them up to a barrage of complaints from the person who they rejected.

The rejection reason should be shown to the editor; if that's not good enough, deal with it.

I come across an already rejected/approved (or casted myself the last review vote). I want to be able to discuss the approval or rejection because I disagree and would like to know why they reviewed that way before I rollback or resubmit the proposal.

See above.

I just was discussing something with the proposer and someone else suddenly cuts my discussion off by approving the change. I'd like to be able to continue my discussion.

This, I agree with. Commentary for changes, whether approved or rejected, should be maintained and still considered "live". Not on the topic page itself; that'd be silly. But on the page for that change itself.

That being said, I would like a time limit on that. We don't want people to be able to bug you over something done months ago.

  • 3
    Actually, I, as a reviewer, would love to get the complaints so that I can educate users better. Sometimes what's obvious to us in a rejection reason is not necessarily obvious to the proposer. Additionally, rejections like "too specific" are not allowing text, so obviously I wonder why it is too specific. Reviewers ought to leave a comment, but not everyone does. In that case you should be able to ping them. … If you are not willing to educate people, maybe SO is the wrong site for you? … And if you fear arrogant reviewers; you do not have to reply to the pings. – bwoebi Jul 28 '16 at 0:20
  • As for the time limit, this is a good idea - I've incorporated it into the question, thanks. … But the question is, is no comments better than people just putting the draft back up into the review queue with no improvement? This would anger me, the reviewer, far more: "Does he have nothing learned??? I've already rejected it!" — thus, ideally, simple ping, simple answer and it's all clear. – bwoebi Jul 28 '16 at 0:29
  • @bwoebi: "If you are not willing to educate people, maybe SO is the wrong site for you?" Which is why close voters can be contacted by those whose questions get closed. Oh wait, they can't. Not unless they willingly choose to by leaving a comment. Rejecting an edit request is conceptually the same as closing a question. You're assuming that everyone would use this system in good faith, to ask for clarification only when things aren't clear. As opposed to asking because they don't like the reason why it was closed or don't agree with it. – Nicol Bolas Jul 28 '16 at 0:32
  • 2
    And definitely going to be lots of ruffled feathers as a result of rejections....especially the way the rep system is set up – charlietfl Jul 28 '16 at 0:43
  • 1
    A difference probably also is that there are a bunch of people which come along of which each of them are able to leave comments … even closed questions get some views and there are only few questions which end up closed without any comment. [They usually are downvoted first, then the asker comments, someone sees it and he gets a reply.] Reviews however are one or two people and that was it. Nobody is looking further. And yes, I like assuming good faith. It is not that bad. At least I'm going to assume that the count of legitimate, as opposed to whining, comments is going to be superior. – bwoebi Jul 28 '16 at 0:52
  • 1
    [600 char comments are not enough...] Q&A is also quite different. What gets closed here are bad questions or duplicates (duplicating creates anyway a comment, so you can be pinged). These questions are usually really bad, then it is not a major loss that you cannot appeal. Docs has sometimes quite high quality standards and I had a few cases where some medium level devs made incorrect edits. Thankfully I leaved an additional comment and they could ping me. I quite often leave comments when rejecting (when not bullshit) and never have seen much whining. You're really assuming the worst, IMHO. – bwoebi Jul 28 '16 at 0:58

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .