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Objective: should I rephrase, improve, or re-post my own unanswered questions to make them more generally useful or garner a response.

Background: I posted a question a while back about a programming problem that was specific to my application, but the question never got upvoted or received an answer (Creating a Python Dictionary using Keys with Wildcards).

This is really my fault for a couple of reasons:

  1. The post was too long
  2. The post was too specific
  3. The code was not a minimal working example (much longer)

Months later--while the specific programming scenario is long past--the general question regarding the usage of dictionary keys with wildcards remains.

I feel like a solution to this particular problem could be useful to myself in the future, in at the same time useful for others.

Question: should I go back and re-write the question, in a way that is more general, shorter, more applicable to others, and more answerable? Should I delete it, and write the edited question in a new question? Should I just forget about the whole thing--the problem is I am still curious if it is possible.

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    "should I rephrase, improve, or re-post my own unanswered questions" For your own good, do not repost. People won't appreciate it. If you leave the original up, the new one will likely be closed as duplicate of the old. If you don't and you deleted the old one, you're likely to garner negative attention from those who saw/commented on the original. – Kendra Jul 27 '16 at 18:30
  • And that was exactly the argument that lead to this question. At the same time, I worry that my bad question with no answers will prevent someone from writing a better one if they have the same question. – Michael Molter Jul 27 '16 at 18:32
  • If someone writes a better question, yours can be closed as a duplicate of it. I actually have an example of that... But the original question was deleted because of how bad it was. As long as your question is unanswered, the only questions that can be closed of duplicates of it are questions you ask. – Kendra Jul 27 '16 at 18:34
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should I go back and re-write the question, in a way that is more general, shorter, more applicable to others, and more answerable?

It'd be great if you did, sure. You're not obligated to do this, but if you're willing to take the time to do it, it's certainly beneficial to the site.

Should I delete it, and write the edited question in a new question?

No.

Should I just forget about the whole thing--the problem is I am still curious if it is possible.

This isn't something we can answer for you. If it's worth it for you to take the time to improve the quesiton in order to get an answer, or to potentially help others get an answer, then great, if you don't think that's worth your time, then who are we to tell you otherwise? We'd certainly like it if you'd improve the question, but if you don't want to, we can't really force you to.

Now, if you have a history of asking poor questions, that would be a problem, and at a minimum, it's good that you've now realized the importance of including important information in a question, not including irrelevant information, and providing a good code example, so you should remember the importance of these concepts in any future questions you ask, even if you don't consider this one quesiton worth the time to improve.

  • So essentially deleting all the content and re-writing the question with much less emphasis on the specific application, and more emphasis on the problem is okay? I'm happy to invest the time. – Michael Molter Jul 27 '16 at 18:34
  • Generally, yes, so long as that really is the underlying problem from the original situation. It's obviously not okay to just delete a quesiton and ask an entirely unrelated question. Having some specifics to the situation can be helpful, so long as it's sufficiently brief, though. Being too general can sometimes create unclear questions. – Servy Jul 27 '16 at 18:40
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I've answered and edited your question there (obviously, don't delete it now!), so I might be in a better position than others to answer.

  • Your question had very few views, which may be a result of not including the tag. Always include the main tag, since that's what most people follow.

  • Your question lacks details about how your code currently works. As the comments indicated, you should say how you generate those values that you need to match against the keys (for example, they are stored separately, then concatenated).

  • I found the answer after one search and a little thinking in a different direction (and a bit of experience with regexes). In the future, you may be able to solve your problem by finding how others solved a similar problem. If you can find a similar but not exact problem that has already been solved, then another avenue to solve your problem is to see if you can change your situation to fit.

  • The meta-effect to the rescue! Thank you for answering my linked question, and especially thank you for the feedback. I think solution 3 is the most difficult to implement. – Michael Molter Jul 28 '16 at 17:59

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