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I have recently become enthusiastic about SO. I started to see that many question related to programming, yet not only touching this topic are commented such as: "This question would better fit in "abc"-communitiy".

In my opinion some question are valuable for several communities at the same time such as for SO, Data Scientists, cross validated, etc.

I think the stack exchange community has been split enough, it might be good to merge some subforums. (e.g. Data Scientist & cross validated)

Alternatively: Do you think, it would be a good idea to enable/allow posting a single question to several stack communities? Or enable linking it? If not, why so?

  • Cross posting on multiple sites is not permitted. – Glorfindel Jul 26 '16 at 9:56
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    You should probably ask those communities whether they feel they need to be merged... those places aren't exactly sub-forums; they each have a distinct culture and different standards in quality. – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Jul 26 '16 at 9:57
  • Cross posting yet is done, and I consider it to be bad (inefficient at least). – Nikolas Rieble Jul 26 '16 at 9:57
  • @Nikolas if something is on topic on SO and a different SE site, you can go on asking on SO. The specialized communities may be able to give you more in-depth input, though - but you'll have to take the time to explore and understand their culture, yes. – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Jul 26 '16 at 10:01
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I think the stack exchange community has been split enough, it might be good to merge some subforums. (e.g. Data Scientist & cross validated)

First off - those communities might not feel they need to be merged. They usually broke away from the main site for a reason. That's the most likely obstacle to any notion of unification right there. They aren't exactly sub-forums; they each have a distinct culture that they've mostly worked hard to build, and different standards in quality.

It's admittedly not always ideal that there's multiple possible venues for the same question on the SE network, but it can be an advantage, too: in each place, you're speaking to different audiences with different specializations.

You may be able to get a quick, but perhaps not as deep answer on a big, high-traffic site (like SO). If you need a super deep answer from a specialist, you may be best off on a smaller site with higher standards - but you should probably be careful to see what kind of questions the smaller site accepts, and what expectations of level and quality they have.

See e.g. SO vs. Database Administrators for an exploration of the differences between those two sites.

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    I did indeed miss all history of SO and the development of subgroups. Therefore, I did always consider that other groups (especially since most are much smaller) are subforums. – Nikolas Rieble Jul 26 '16 at 10:09
  • I honestly do not know how this problem could be addressed, but I kind of feel that the communities are split too hard nowadays. I am a computer science student specializing in AI / machine learning, thus no professional at all but also not a beginner. However, I often do not know which site would fit best for my question. Additionally, even Cross Validated has so few users (compared to SO) that questions do not get answered frequently. Obviously, the problem is even worse for Data Science, Artificial Intelligence and the other specialized sites in this field, which are even smaller. – daniel451 May 30 '17 at 5:39
  • @daniel451 a specific case like that might be worth bringing up on the specific site's meta. It's going to be up to those communities to see if they feel they are too small; I think communities have merged before. It shouldn't be something ordered from above, though. – Pekka supports GoFundMonica May 30 '17 at 6:59

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