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Many of the most popular tags in the newly-released Documentation part of SO are for languages. In each language there are often topics or examples for how to do common tasks in various libraries that are maintained outside the canonical implementation of the language.

Some of these get approved and enshrined in with the language documentation, and some get rejected and told to move off in their own topic (if it was just a stray example) or told to move off the programming language tag entirely and added to a new library-specific tag.

Which should it be? Should Language tags only have strict language syntax and standard library documentation and everything else live in tags? Will there be a way to group tags together as being a part of the same language ecosystem?

closed as off-topic by Robert Columbia, Michael Gaskill, Robert Longson, il_raffa, SuperBiasedMan Nov 7 '18 at 17:58

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Should Language tags only have strict language syntax and standard library documentation and everything else live in tags?

Yes! Language tags should contain only documentation about the language itself, not documentation for related libraries.

Doing anything else gets prohibitively unwieldy, not to mention redundant. For a common language like C++ or C#, there are probably millions of different libraries that have bindings for the language. For a lingua franca like C, you can almost literally use any library that you want.

Now, I realize this isn't what people want to do. They only want to document the most common libraries for the language in the language tag. But that is still wrong. The most common libraries already have a dedicated tag and therefore a dedicated section for their documentation. Don't clutter up the language documentation with irrelevant information about libraries. The language documentation alone is complicated and cluttered enough.

If you want to document Qt, put that in the Qt tag documentation, not in the C++ tag documentation. Same thing for Boost: even though it's strictly a C++ library and is designed to act very much like part of the core language, it is not actually part of the core language and shouldn't clutter up documentation for the core language. We have a separate section for it. Similarly, iOS and macOS APIs get documented under their respective tags, not under Objective-C language documentation. jQuery gets documented under jQuery, not under JavaScript. Simple and straightforward.

The only time it makes sense to talk about a library in language documentation is if you want to mention that library as an idiomatic way of solving a problem in that language. This makes sense if you think of Documentation as a "cookbook"-style repository of recipes for common coding scenarios. One of the scenarios might be parsing a string using regular expressions, and you might recommend a library to do this (if the language doesn't have this feature built-in). But you should not attempt to exhaustively document that library there. Rather, you should link to the documentation for that library. This is the web, after all. We have hyperlinks—use 'em!

Will there be a way to group tags together as being a part of the same language ecosystem?

This might be nice to have eventually. Some kind of a community-editable "related tags" section. For .NET, you'd associate the C#, VB.NET, WinForms, WPF, ASP.NET, .NET Core, and such tags. For C++, you'd naturally associate the Boost tag, tags for common compilers, tags for common build environments, etc.

But such a feature does not exist yet, so you'll have to maintain it manually by adding links to relevant examples.

  • what's the common convention for labeling libraries in an ecosystem? just using the name of the lib, or a pattern like "language-lib"? – Conrad.Dean Jul 24 '16 at 6:42
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    If the name of the library does not collide with other common names, then just using the name of the library is fine. Note that Documentation doesn't change any of this, because it just uses the existing tags. – Cody Gray Jul 24 '16 at 6:56

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