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There's multiple reports of users just copy&pasting plagiarized content into Documentation.

Are there moderator tools in place so those users can be banned from editing Documentation after a number of infractions / plagiarism flags?

Is flagging plagiarism currently effective, or a waste of time?

closed as off-topic by Robert Columbia, il_raffa, Michael Gaskill, Robert Longson, Code Lღver Nov 3 '18 at 6:47

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The problem described here can no longer be reproduced. Changes to the system or to the circumstances affecting the asker have rendered it obsolete. If you encounter a similar problem, please post a new question." – Robert Columbia, il_raffa, Michael Gaskill, Robert Longson, Code Lღver
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Just in case someone thinks this is not a problem: the majority of my rejects yesterday were because of plagiarism. And I used my 30 reviews. – rene Jul 22 '16 at 10:22
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    An example: In documentation, the explanation of the C++ Rule of Three (stackoverflow.com/documentation/c%2b%2b/1206/…) is a straight copy and paste of an answer: stackoverflow.com/a/4172724/3982001. Clearly, the author is not the same, so the new guy is getting rep for copying and pasting a high-quality (currently 1144 upvotes!) post made by another user. – Fabio Turati Jul 22 '16 at 16:27
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    Indeed, @Fabio. I've flagged that one myself, and so have several other users, multiple times. Obviously someone keeps dismissing the flags. I think this is a very serious problem. Attribution is very important around here; this copy-paste contains absolutely no attribution, and even if it did, I'm still not convinced it would be acceptable. – Cody Gray Jul 22 '16 at 16:31
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    @CodyGray Wow, I've just flagged it myself. To be honest there's a proposed change by the same user (stackoverflow.com/documentation/proposed/changes/33499) that at least adds a link to the original post (just the link, nothing else). Still, I think it's really unfair. And by the way, if the original author (Fredoverflow) posted it in Documentation, would he get double reputation from people upvoting both the answer and the doc? This is also a problem, as I see it. Though less serious, of course. – Fabio Turati Jul 22 '16 at 16:40
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    If existing answers are the best source of current documentation, I really don't see a problem in giving rep to somebody for filling in documentation, so long as they give proper attribution. The fiddly work of putting the answer into documentation and editing it to fit the new format is valuable. -- And the fact of the matter is, the objective is good documentation. Rep is a carrot to make that happen, but it's far less important than creating a useful resource. – Conspicuous Compiler Jul 22 '16 at 16:42
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    No editing was done here, and no formatting was changed, @conspicuous. Just a straight up copy-paste. And I don't really buy that argument. I mean, there are no other circumstances where it's legal to profit off of and pass of others work as my own, even if I give them credit in a footnote. The content is already perfectly happy on Stack Overflow. Why can't it just be linked instead? It's not like we have to worry about link rot for ourselves. – Cody Gray Jul 22 '16 at 16:43
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    I don't think imaginary internet points count as profit. – Conspicuous Compiler Jul 22 '16 at 16:44
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    @ConspicuousCompiler in the context of this site, they do - people do things to gain them, things that hurt the site. It doesn't matter whether we think they have any value or not. – Pekka 웃 Jul 22 '16 at 17:26
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    I've just seen a user earn the Knowledgeable badge for replacing content that they had plagiarised from one source with content plagiarised from another source after the initial content was flagged. The irony would be amusing if it wasn't so frustrating. – Andy Wilkinson Jul 24 '16 at 6:08
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    @Andy don't hesitate to flag such cases directly for mod attention (by flagging a random post on SO proper and explaining the situation, including a link) – Pekka 웃 Jul 24 '16 at 7:57
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    @Pekka Thanks. I've done that already based on Undo's answer below. Looks to be in the moderators' queue at the moment. – Andy Wilkinson Jul 24 '16 at 8:33
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    A case of straight copy would be easier, but what to do when an edit contains code that looks similar to code in a blog: same method names and some other details. Should there be at least a reference to that blog? – J.J. Hakala Jul 27 '16 at 9:43
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"In need of moderator intervention" flags on Documentation don't seem to be real flags yet; they show up as improvement requests and don't enter the moderator queue.

I would treat this as any other plagiarism case: valid grounds for warning and suspension. If they're abusing Documentation, they're abusing the whole site and need to take a break.

Throw a flag on one of their QA posts and we'll look at it.

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    I was told in chat that those flags go to staff right now. Not sure if that's correct, though; I haven't actually used one. – Josh Caswell Jul 22 '16 at 16:38
  • I flagged it for diamond moderator attention a couple of hours ago. We'll see if a staff member handles it or not. Like Josh, I definitely remember seeing it claimed that these flags go directly to staff, and it wasn't in chat, it was here on Meta. (As for being shown publicly, I think maybe they're only shown publicly to you if you're the one who raises them? Not sure, don't have a sock puppet.) – Cody Gray Jul 22 '16 at 16:41
  • @JoshCaswell i.stack.imgur.com/qjwrK.gif; they're shown publicly and aren't in the mod queue anywhere I can see. – Undo Jul 22 '16 at 16:41
  • @CodyGray They're shown publicly; I can see them in an incognito window. – Undo Jul 22 '16 at 16:42
  • Do I miss something here? There is seems to be no way to raise a flag on new topic :/ stackoverflow.com/documentation/proposed/changes/30621 – zero323 Jul 22 '16 at 16:43
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    How about copying from my own SO answers? While trying out Documentation, in several of my examples I have used content from some of my previous answers. While I modify it to be more applicable to Documentation, a number of my examples are essentially the same as things I wrote in SO answers. Should I be making new examples? – Suragch Jul 22 '16 at 16:52
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    @Suragch - Pulling from your own content shouldn't be a problem, you wrote it originally. It's copying the words of another without attribution that's the problem. – Brad Larson Jul 22 '16 at 16:58
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    @BradLarson So copying content from an answer and saying "this comes from ..." is OK? – DavidG Jul 22 '16 at 17:00
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    I wonder if we shouldn't just have people use "other" flags on the posts on Stack Overflow that are being plagiarized by people in Documentation, since moderators don't see Documentation flags. If someone's plagiarizing content to Documentation, I think we should be issuing plagiarism warnings and suspensions to main SO accounts. They're gaining SO reputation for this, after all. – Brad Larson Jul 22 '16 at 17:01
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    That's exactly what I think, @BradLarson. This is a moderation problem first, and a content/improvement-request problem second. – Undo Jul 22 '16 at 17:01
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    @Servy brings up a good point. There is indeed a section in the help center on proper attribution. And it says: "Do not copy the complete text of external sources; instead, use their words and ideas to support your own. And always give proper credit to the author and site where you found the text, including a direct link to it." So that seems like pretty compelling evidence that copying and pasting answers directly from Q&A into Documentation is not acceptable, even if you provide attribution. Pretty standard. Fair use != shameless stealing. – Cody Gray Jul 22 '16 at 17:11
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    @Servy actually, the proper attribution doesn't mention if you are indeed the author what should happen. Example, you wrote the docs for Vainilla, and now you are copying the same content on SO, you still have to attribute yourself for that (in case of the original license even allowed yourself to do that). – Braiam Jul 22 '16 at 17:30
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    @Braiam The licence of that content wouldn't give you the right to re-post it, but since it is your content, that you own, you have the right to post it. You don't need to leverage the licence to post the content, so it's not a problem. Remember, licences in general don't revoke ownership, they only ever give people using the licence's content some rights with respect to it; they don't take away the original owner's rights to that content. – Servy Jul 22 '16 at 17:34
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    @Braiam You let users of your work pick any of the licenses you offer it under. All the licenses combine (if one says "no commercial usage" but one allows it, then commercial usage is allowed) and you enforce the combination. – ArtOfCode Jul 23 '16 at 15:27
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    Maybe I'm just getting unlucky with what I review (I hope so) but better than half of what I see is copypasta. I just found one where the code had been pasted but the comments were removed. I don't know how you can get more unhelpful than that. Argh! – Josh Caswell Jul 24 '16 at 4:23

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