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Given worries about inflationary rep gain and about low-quality content being posted, would it not be wise to turn off any rep gain from Documentation activity until things have settled?

This would

  • prevent a "gold rush" type athmosphere from taking hold, encouraging activity for activity's sake - something that could be very destructive at this point

  • make sure that Documentation is seeded by those users who actually care, rather than those to whom rep gain is a goal in and of itself

  • 21
    Gold rush? What are you doing here, man - there's folks be needing genuine discount designer pickaxes! – Shog9 Jul 21 '16 at 13:22
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    @Shog9 I am already selling those under the counter, of course. This question is my effort to look concerned about the site's well-being at the same time. – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Jul 21 '16 at 13:23
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    Seems pretty contradictory to the goal of "seeding". You get people to slovenly copy/paste all the existing snippets spread around by promising a pot of internet gold coins. This project only ever turns useful when Google starts indexing and pushing it up, volume required. – Hans Passant Jul 21 '16 at 13:29
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    Related 10 reputation for topic editing is too high – Braiam Jul 21 '16 at 13:39
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    It is very demotivating seeing how easy it is to gain/game reputation from the new documentation. Compare it to how tedious it is gaining a +15 from an accepted answer sometimes. – Josh Crozier Jul 21 '16 at 15:22
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    This is very similar to solving the Fastest Gun in the West Problem – 4castle Jul 21 '16 at 21:11
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    There's no gold rush. It takes significant effort to write the docs, it's slow to get reviewed, and with the lack of activity in the Documentation Beta most accepted contributions sit around with 0 votes. I spent about 45 minutes on docs today and 25 minutes on Q&A and gained +50 on Q&A and +5 on docs. You can turn off the rep gains but then expect the Beta to fail hard(er). – Hack-R Jul 21 '16 at 21:45
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    @Hack-R here is an example of effort that has credited the author hundreds of reputation points (see my post). Note the name of the topic, 'Array'. SO users seem to be so happy to up-vote the first topic they encounter. – J.J. Hakala Jul 25 '16 at 12:29
  • @Shog9 What should be done with all of the examples that contain content that should have gone in parameters or remarks? Unfortunately a lot of people are just posting an example in order to gain rep instead of putting things where they belong..... – Daniel Nugent Jul 25 '16 at 15:41
  • When it becomes apparent that repetitious content is clogging up examples, edit and move it @DanielNugent. Here's one that came up last week - instead of every example beginning with an explanation of how C programs receive arguments, that can go in Remarks. For a single example, no harm in just keeping it in the example. – Shog9 Jul 25 '16 at 15:50
  • @shog9 ok, sounds good. One more thing, what should be done with verbatim copy/paste from official documentation examples? – Daniel Nugent Jul 25 '16 at 15:54
  • Delete it and please raise a flag if it seems serious enough, @DanielNugent. – jscs Jul 25 '16 at 17:38
24

I have been a member of Stack Overflow for 6 months. During that time I have written 143 answers and gained a little bit over 2500 reputation (no questions; RTFM or RTFS usually works if extensive googling doesn't).

Now it seems like that it is possible to gain repeatedly 200 reputation per day after making just a few minor edit, see post for an example. In other words, potentially that 2500 reputation in just two weeks. The most deciding factor seems to be that the topic is the first one related to a popular language.

I really have to wonder what kind of signal this is giving me. I already had considered that reputation system is quite broken, but now it seems to be beyond the pale.

I think I can draw my conclusions in a couple days regarding whether I continue to contribute to Stack Overflow or not. If the problems are not apparent now to those who make decisions about the site, I doubt they are in the near future.

4

Personally I think this would be counter-productive in terms of actually getting the seeding done... regardless, it just kicks the can down the road. Docs has been in private beta for months, with reputation completely separate from Stack Overflow; the stuff that's weird or broken now is stuff that couldn't be seen in that environment.

If we want this to be used, if we want this to actually work, then sooner or later we gotta figure out how to make this work on Stack Overflow. Yes, that's gonna be painful at times. Like ripping off a band-aid. Remember how awful suggested edits were? That was tiny compared to this. Eventually, we'll work out the problems.

See also: Addressing Documentation #RepGateApocalypse

  • Why not keep a separate reputation score (possibly in a similar way that other SE sites keep their scores separate)? – Bruno Jul 26 '16 at 9:17
-3

Editing a topic only gets you 2 reputation now. Editing docs is no harder than editing normal Q&A posts for small edits.

Large and high-quality edits get 5 reputation per upvote - much more than a measly 2 point gain.

Low quality content - no.

Inflationary rep gain - maybe.

  • 3
    What makes it inflationary if you have to write something large and high-quality that earns an upvote from your peers? How is that any different from Q&A? – Hack-R Jul 21 '16 at 21:47
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    @Hack-R that's my point – noɥʇʎԀʎzɐɹƆ Jul 21 '16 at 21:58
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    Oh ok, right on – Hack-R Jul 21 '16 at 22:35
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    Oh my, when did we become the site where only good content is upvoted and only valuable suggestions are being approved by peers? Hallelujah! – Andras Deak Jul 22 '16 at 11:18
  • Right now, 'large and high-quality edits get 5 reputation per upvote' is not the whole truth. Minor edits (worth +2 maybe) also get stream of reputation points: edit associated rep gain – J.J. Hakala Jul 26 '16 at 8:15

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