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Consider that an op

  • asks if a specific feature is available in language A which they are new to.
  • also mentions he is aware that such is a feature is available in B which they are used to.
  • tags the question with A & B

Is it better/allowed if the answerer puts an example/code-excerpt from B (that explains a feature) and then come to A and state if that feature is present/not present(for whatsoever reasons)?

  • Seems like a simple yes/no question which isn't really a suitable question for SO. See this – Andrew Li Jul 12 '16 at 5:34
  • @AndrewL. Appreciate that, at the same time questions can be more involved. say, why didn't the designers encourage multiple inheritance in php. I know it is available in C++ – sjsam Jul 12 '16 at 5:39
  • I guess if the answer is more than a yes or no and the question is not opinion based, or anything else, it should be ok, but of course, I'm no expert on post quality. – Andrew Li Jul 12 '16 at 5:41
  • @AndrewL. : The test case is just an example by the way. :) – sjsam Jul 12 '16 at 5:41
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If the question can be answered in one word then it normally shows that the person asking the question didn't put any effort in on their own part to solve it, which would make it an invalid question.

A valid answer may be:

No, In A, instead you do Foo as shown in the [documentation](link)

Generally though, quite often when you're asking about a specific feature, you're asking about a solution rather than the actual problem you're trying to solve so the entire question could be reworded into a valid one

I'm trying to do X in A, If I was trying to do X in B then I would do foo, but my research is showing that foo isn't available in A....


Is it better/allowed if the answerer puts an example/code-excerpt from B (that explains a feature) and then come to A and state if that feature is present/not present(for whatsoever reasons)?

If it helps describe your point at all then it is worth adding it to your answer, although before writing your answer, you might want to take the time to ask the OP what it is they're actually trying to do.

  • One of my own (shameless) examples of a question asking about a specific feature/problem in the format described above. – Sayse Jul 12 '16 at 6:52

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