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As soon as a VB comment is in a code sample, the rest of the code formatting is messed up until the next comment (if there is another one).

Should we add a policy to escape comments with ' so the code is better readable? Or should I go ahead and edit them in?

Good example of messed up code

'this is a comment
this.Not

We could escape them like this:

'this is a comment'
this.Not

Because the css probably makes everything a char after a ' and waits for the end.

It is also a problem that comments sometimes look like code after, and it's really hard to read VB code because of that.

What could be a solution to this problem?

closed as off-topic by Mafii, Glorfindel, HaveNoDisplayName, Toto, user6263819 Jul 8 '16 at 18:24

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The problem described here can no longer be reproduced. Changes to the system or to the circumstances affecting the asker have rendered it obsolete. If you encounter a similar problem, please post a new question." – Mafii, Glorfindel, HaveNoDisplayName, Toto, Michael Gaskill
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • That "good example" is tagged with c#, so it's using c# formatting, not VB. See meta.stackexchange.com/questions/184108/… – Heretic Monkey Jul 8 '16 at 15:25
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    After rene's edit, it looks pretty good. Remember that language detection is not automatic, it can be derived from the tag (in this case C#), but if you have 'mixed' content, you need to give Prettify a little hint. – Glorfindel Jul 8 '16 at 15:27
  • @Glorfindel oh ye it does, thanks a lot. Didn't know about the language tags`! – Mafii Jul 8 '16 at 15:28
  • It is just a bug in Google's parser, it has been around for ever. It interprets the comment as a string literal. The simple workaround is to use 2 quotes, '' this is a comment – Hans Passant Jul 8 '16 at 16:01
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There is too much going on in that post. It has C#, VB.NET and XAML markup.

And now you expect magically that the code prettifier makes sense of that? The developers here are more than great but they didn't master this ... yet.

The syntax highlighter takes the language hint from the tag. As c# is the main tag, all code blocks will use the lang-cs prettifier.

I've added a <!-- language: lang-vb --> at the start of the VB.NET block to tell the prettifier that it needs to use lang-vb instead of the post default.

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In this case the problem was the language tags, but this happens legitimately.

This highly up voted Perl & regex answer illustrates this perfectly. It is using the proper highlighting, but the second half of the code is using string highlighting. I'm not sure if this is the type of "obfuscated code" Google Prettify meant when they said:

It doesn't work on <obfuscated code sample>?

Yes. Prettifying obfuscated code is like putting lipstick on a pig — i.e. outside the scope of this tool

(Don't listen to them, regexes can be beautiful.)

I find this behavior extremely annoying. As long as it doesn't change the meaning of the code, it will improve the readability of the code, and thus would be a good edit (but probably too risky for a suggestion).


It seems you were a little too late with your suggestion. VB comment highlighting was a problem back in 2008.

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