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I recently found a question which asks for the definition of a word in Apple's Human Interface Guidelines. To me, this question is off-topic.

  1. It is not a programming question.

  2. It is asking for the definition of an English word (in a mobile UI sense).

  3. It is [potentially] opinion-based since the interpretation of the word may vary. Only Apple knows the "true" definition in this context since they wrote the document, and a direct inquiry on an Apple support forum would give a more explicit (and subjectively correct) answer.

  4. It is a UX question and may be better suite for UX.SE if it were edited to be less broad.

Due to the bounty on the question, I was unable to vote to close the question. I mod flagged for closure with this reason:

This bounty question is not a programming question, but a question about the wording in Apple's Human Interface Guidelines about UI wording. I cannot vote to close this question due to the bounty attached.

The mod response:

declined - a moderator reviewed your flag, but found no evidence to support it

Are questions about Apple's Human Interface Guidelines, or other design documentation (non-technical) off-topic for Stack Overflow?

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    That's what UX.SE is for... – Laurel Jun 22 '16 at 21:28
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    Maybe my threshold for trash has been significantly lowered over the past two years, but it strikes me as rather important that any [ios] programmer should understand the UI guidelines. The question is crystal-clear. Then again, odd that it hasn't been answered yet. Hmm. Well, it has a bounty on it, no way it is going to get closed now. – Hans Passant Jun 22 '16 at 21:36
  • Question posters must wait two days before they can post a bounty. In that time, not a single user with close-vote privileges opted to cast a close vote on that question, so. – Robert Harvey Jun 22 '16 at 22:56
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    @RobertHarvey just because the question fell through the cracks of community moderation does not mean that it is not off-topic. – JAL Jun 22 '16 at 22:57
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    No, but it does mean that there is not strong motivation from the community to do anything about it. The question is not even controversial; controversial questions get close votes, downvotes, upvotes and numerous comments. – Robert Harvey Jun 22 '16 at 22:58
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    @RobertHarvey Give me infinite close votes and downvotes, and I'll show you strong motivation. – Sotirios Delimanolis Jun 22 '16 at 23:02
  • I fail to see how a question about a technical term in official IOS guidelines regarding user interfaces is off-topic on tags for ios and user-interface. I think that it is rather obviously on-topic. – John Coleman Jun 22 '16 at 23:22
  • Very related meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/252192/… – psubsee2003 Jun 22 '16 at 23:41
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It is not a programming question.

Only in the sense that it does not involve a specific piece of code. It does involve design practice, which must be implemented by a programmer, as specified by Apple's guidelines. To me, this question is no different than someone asking about the behavior of the OpenGL tessellation system.

They're not programming per-se, but the answers will certainly inform programmers about how to do their job.

It is asking for the definition of an English word (in a mobile UI sense).

So is "what does 'vertex' refer to," but that would be a valid question about some portion of the OpenGL specification. Especially when you provide a quote from said specification that shows the context the term is used in.

It is [potentially] opinion-based since the interpretation of the word may vary. Only Apple knows the "true" definition in this context since they wrote the document, and a direct inquiry on an Apple support forum would give a more explicit (and subjectively correct) answer.

I don't know anything about iOS development. But just from reading the question, I don't get that sense. The use of the term "inspector" in the document seems to suggest that it is something which can be "implemented". That sounds like a real, objective concept. I have no reason to assume that there is no definition behind the use of that term.

So I would say that you need to provide evidence that there is no such objective definition.

Furthermore, asking about interpretations of documents related to programming has a very long history on this site. Indeed, this question seems better than the common "why does the C++ spec do forbid X" style questions.

It is a UX question and may be better suite for UX.SE if it were edited to be less broad.

Maybe. But that doesn't mean it isn't on-topic for SO.

Are questions about Apple's Human Interface Guidelines, or other design documentation (non-technical) off-topic for Stack Overflow?

I say that it should be looked at on a case-by-case basis. How important to an iOS developer are Apple's Human Interface Guidelines? Will an incorrect implementation of them cause a programmer's iOS app to fail to be published? How important is maintaining a consistent look-and-feel to Apple users, and therefore to programmers making apps for them?

It is not unreasonable for interface guidelines to be considered programmer documentation as much as UX documentation.

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    About the vertex sample, a simplier way to demonstrate the point, would be to consider that a programmer can't use an API/framework if he doesn't understand the concepts/objects behind it. So a programmer can't use a vertex properly if he doesn't understand what it means. And i think people will be more happy to answer to "what is a vertex ? i don't understand it" to a low quality question from sommeone who don't understand the basics of what he's trying. And such content is so more valuable to SO. – Walfrat Jun 23 '16 at 13:01

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