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Among the most common reason to close a question here is because it is off-topic1. The frequency of this type of close action has increased markedly since other SE sites have opened which "carve off" various bits of the question domain which were previously "on topic" here at SO.

So when a question gets closed as off topic, the primary (only?) resource you get pointed at is the on topic portion of the help center. Now that section usefully includes a list of other useful sites, which may be on-topic for questions originally posted to SO:

If your question is not specifically on-topic for Stack Overflow, it may be on topic for another Stack Exchange site ...

However, that list doesn't include Programmers.SE! That has to be one of the primary sites to which programming related questions which aren't on-topic for SO belong, especially given the late introduction date of P.SE relate to SO - before that date, many questions which now belong on P.SE were succesfully asked on SO. The existing "recommended" list includes some really obscure domain-specific stuff like a link to the TeX and Sharepoint sites, but not programmers?

The same complaint applies also to CS.SE and softwarerecs.SE - although the argument isn't as strong in those places.

I get that we can't comprehensively list every site that a SO question should be redirected to, but we can make a reasonable effort to cover the top possibilities.

To clarify, this isn't about migration or migration tags. The questions I surveyed weren't migrated, and in any case the comment is about how the help center redirects users, not how effective or ineffective the migration process is.


1Based solely on my anecdotal survey of a ~dozen highly voted, closed-as-off-topic questions.

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    However, that list doesn't include SE.Programmers! That has to be the #1 site to which programming related questions which aren't on-topic for SO belong. Are you sure that is true? Do you have any stats to prove that? One of the biggest complaints Programmers.SE has is regarding the number of off-topic questions being asked there. – Taryn Jun 17 '16 at 23:11
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  • @bluefeet - no I don't have any stats, but I appreciate help from anyone who has the tools to collect them. My observation is anecdotal after checking about a dozen highly voted but closed questions on SO. Most of those were on-topic back in 2010 or whatever, but have since become OT as other SE sites have been created. In all but one case, the appropriate site seemed to be Programmers. Now, the #1 position may actually be up for debate, but hopefully we can agree that, for example, there are more ?s that belong on SE.Programmers than SE.Sharepoint (for example). – BeeOnRope Jun 17 '16 at 23:41
  • @Braiam - I can't speak for the entire P.SE community, but at least that question doesn't seem to support the assertion. It mostly seems to be reflecting the idea that they don't want to be a dumping ground any more than SO wants to be a dumping ground. I don't think that's the issue here - I'm talking about otherwise quality questions. Honestly I'm very confused at the most-upvoted answer: "A good question on Programmers.SE would be a good question on Stack Overflow". So then all good P.SE questions could just be asked on SO? They seem to be missing a caveat about scope... – BeeOnRope Jun 17 '16 at 23:47
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    @BeeOnRope if you think a good number of closed questions are on-tpics on Programmers, please provide some specific examples. It is much easier to have these types of debating witgout hr difrd vitnuf – psubsee2003 Jun 17 '16 at 23:49
  • @psubsee2003 I'm not sure if it was on purpose... but those typos are funny – Braiam Jun 17 '16 at 23:52
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    This is one that I've frequently wished was an option for an off-topic close reason. – Michael Gaskill Jun 18 '16 at 0:00
  • @psubsee2003 - I kind of wanted to avoid turning this into a referendum on specific questions (which is generally what happens when one links to question(s) on meta). It's pretty easy to verify that a large number of old questions on non-programming software development questions end up closed as off-topic (usually years later). Especially in the areas of licensing, QA and methodologies. In fact, enough of that remains effectively "on topic" (e.g., methodologies lives in a grey area, because you always always add code to make it concrete) that plenty of new stuff remains unclosed on SO. – BeeOnRope Jun 18 '16 at 0:04
  • I'd argue that that list should include all SE websites that are out of beta. Recently i flagged a question on SO to go into SE en espanol, and another one into U&L. For the flag I just used the generic "ask for moderator attention". The last question, the one i believe should go into U&L, was moved to SU instead, probably because U&L is not an option in the form. It is hard to see whether that question is fit for SF or SU but it would fit well into U&L. – grochmal Jun 18 '16 at 0:29
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    @grochmal - you are in luck, it does. When introducing the list of "most likely" sites, it links to the overall SE directory, which currently contains 156 sites. I think we can agree if a user needs to examine 156 sites such as "cooking", "Русский язык", or "Mi Yodeya" they aren't going to get to the bottom. There is some value in specifically calling out some sites that might be the top targets of OT SO questions. – BeeOnRope Jun 18 '16 at 0:38
  • @grochmal the question wasn't moved anywhere. Also SU scope includes large chunks of U&L scope, sans some exeptions where SU folks will be definitively unable to answer – Braiam Jun 18 '16 at 1:02
  • (at)BeeOnRope - Good point, i can see people clicking on the "first sensible thing" on such a list, without it being sensible at all. @Braiam - Thanks, i learned something about the close messages. I'm still rather new here, and have a good deal to learn. – grochmal Jun 18 '16 at 1:20
  • I'm struggling to see this as a dupe of the linked question. I'm not suggesting a new flag or migration path. I'm simply saying that the help center should include a note about P.SE, because many questions that are closed here would be on topic there. – BeeOnRope Jun 18 '16 at 20:00
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I have over 20k rep on Software Engineering, and have been actively involved in user moderation for most of my time since hitting 3k.

Stack Overflow is a very unique site on the Stack Exchange network simply because of the volume and nature of questions. Maintaining quality is important for any site, but certainly so when you have approximately eight gajillion questions asked per day.

There are certain users who I will simply call "help vampires" who tend to run into question bans, rate limiting, and other countermeasures designed to improve the signal to noise ratio. These users ignore every roadblock you try to put in their way just to get even a little bit of help for their poor-quality questions.

Once a user runs into a roadblock, it is important not to suggest avenues for them to load up the crap cannon and fire at another site. Over at Programmers we get a lot of off-topic questions, many of them from users suspected of asking there because they are blocked over here and trying anything to get even a hint as to an answer. They do not care about reputation, whether tangible (points) or intangible (name). They just want an answer to their poorly-asked question.

Suggesting sites whether in the help center or a comment can backfire for those other sites. A small amount of the time it works out great, but voting to migrate or flagging for a moderator to migrate (they can migrate to any site) is the appropriate action. The vast majority of the time when mentioning even the name of another site it ends up with a mess to clean up and frustrated users.

The existing "recommended" list includes some really obscure domain-specific stuff like a link to the TeX and SharePoint sites, but not programmers?

TeX and SharePoint are both implementation-related, as is DBA. It is perfectly reasonable to say "if you have a question that is otherwise on-topic at Stack Overflow, it may be better to ask at this domain-specific site that has more experts' eyeballs on questions.

Software Engineering has a long and sordid history of being impossible to understand, and I say that as a high-rep user there. Recommending people post there when they are not sure of the scope of a site like Stack Overflow (my code is broken, derp) is a recipe for disaster.

Related reading:

  • Those are indeed serious problems with P.SE and Q&A sites in general. It seems like there is a long history between SO and P.SE in terms of question migration and other debates. I think the solutions include continual vigilance, a number of active moderators, technological solutions like rate limiting and so on. I don't think hiding the existence P.SE by leaving it out of the appropriate section in the help files is among the set of good solutions. You'll just have to trust me when I say that help vampire types are not finding P.SE by a careful reading of the help files. – BeeOnRope Jun 18 '16 at 19:58
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    @BeeOnRope trust me, we know the help vampires are really bad at reading guidance even when it is in their faces. We feel SO's pain. My point is just that we should not add an extra mention, an extra link to click in a vain attempt at getting even a sliver of an answer and repeating the bad behavior. – user439793 Jun 19 '16 at 3:03

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