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There is an extremely popular question in : Bash scripting & read file line by line. It has attracted almost 500K visits in four years and there is already a canonical, well documented, useful answer - the accepted one.

However, I noticed that there are answers posted that explain the same, but often with less detail and without the important caveats that the accepted answer has. Moreover, they were posted years after. Since the question has these many amount of visits, they eventually got some upvotes, so they give the wrong message: you can post a bad answer after a while, or just repeat something that was already posted, and get some credit out of it.

We could state that such situations should be handled using our super power: voting. In this case, downvoting. However, I don't think it is fair to downvote an answer if it is a duplicate: we vote based on quality. That's why I raised a custom flag to one of them stating:

this is exactly what was posted years ago and it is less recommended that the accepted answer. I guess it should be deleted because it is just a duplicate answer.

But it was declined with the message a moderator reviewed your flag, but found no evidence to support it.

What can be done in these situations? Is this an encouraged behaviour? Note I would like to distinguish two situations:

  • Answers that are just the same → since they are good answers, should we flag them?
  • Answers that are almost the same, but with a fragile approach → tecnhically they are not wrong, just not that good. Should we downvote and let them drown to the bottom?
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    As a first-step measure, I have protected the question. With any luck it will improve things a little. – Frédéric Hamidi Jun 15 '16 at 8:21
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    IMHO if the answer adds nothing new it a least deserves a comment saying so and I tend to also hand out a down vote with that as it is not need(not useful). – NathanOliver Jun 15 '16 at 12:04
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    I'm guessing the flag decline is because it wasn't felt a mod-delete was deserved in this instance? Downvoting seems too tame of an action here, since Googlers upvote at a much higher rate than established community members visit these questions and prune them. – Two-Bit Alchemist Jun 15 '16 at 12:18
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    @Two-BitAlchemist exactly! That is a key point here: few people caring about this and downvoting won't ballance all those Googlers upvoting. That's why I don't know what is the correct behaviour here and tried with a flag. Since it was declined, I want to see what other options we have. – fedorqui Jun 15 '16 at 12:24
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    If other users are upvoting what you consider a duplicate answer, that indicates those people found it useful. Perhaps it was phrased in a different way that made more sense to those people. Of course, if the answer was unhelpful to you in particular, feel free to downvote. – Everyone_Else Jun 15 '16 at 15:25
  • I think one problem is that people lose points for down-voting? – pabrams Jun 17 '16 at 13:22
  • @pabrams You can post a duplicate answer and get some upvotes and then downvote 10 times duplicated answers with that reputation ;-) – fedorqui Jun 17 '16 at 22:34
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Raising flags on duplicated answers is a risky proposition. The closer you are to be dealing with exact duplication, the greater your chances of success. The less exact the duplication the more you become dependent on whether or not the moderator that handles your flag knows the technology and can see that the later answer amounts to the same thing as the earlier one. In any case the more information you provide, the better the chances. I raise moderator flags only in egregious cases: exact duplicates that are not FGITW, and cases of plagiarism. (In case it needs be said: not all exact duplicates amount to plagiarism, and plagiarism can happen without exact duplication.)

In all cases where I have decided that a later answer is providing nothing valuable that was not provided in earlier answers I do downvote and I do vote to delete where I can. Note that I consider that an answer that provides the same solution as an earlier one but explains it better is a valuable contribution and I do upvote these.

Often I also comment on the duplicate answer. In some cases I'll flat out say something like

This answer is not adding anything not provided in [link to earlier answer] that was posted [span of time] before yours.

Or in cases where I feel that maybe the answerer means to provide additional value but failed to express how their answer adds to the earlier ones and I failed to detect this additional value I may comment with a question asking

What is this answer providing that was not provided by [link to earlier answer] posted [span of time] before yours?

As I see it, these comments are useful because:

  1. The answerer may not have realized that there is a problem with duplicating answers. Or even that they were duplicating answers. (Heck, I've posted wrong answers on SO, sometimes. We all make mistakes once in a while.)

  2. Future voters might think twice before upvoting an answer that is true, yes, but is not adding value to the site.

  3. It helps the other people who have the power to delete figure out immediately why this answer should be deleted.

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    Very interesting insight. Clearly, it was my fault to raise a flag on something that, to me, is the same, but it is not clear for someone not very familiar with the topic. The rest of your answer is a very good guideline on how to approach such situations. Thanks for this! – fedorqui Jun 16 '16 at 7:36
  • When don't "exact duplicates amount to plagiarism"? I guess in the case of one-liners, or someone copy-pasting a paragraph from some documentation, but in those cases, the answerers should almost always be adding more explanation, shouldn't they? – Joshua Taylor Jun 16 '16 at 19:31
  • @JoshuaTaylor If I ask "How can I get Mocha to find tests in subdirectories?" and Bob answers mocha --recursive and then Alice answer mocha --recursive, there's no grounds to say that Alice plagiarized Bob's answer. It does not matter if she answered 2 seconds after Bob or 3 years after him. They both answered straightforwardly the question asked. If Alice answered 3 years after Bob, then I'd downvote and vote to delete (if I can) but flagging for plagiarism is not warranted. – Louis Jun 16 '16 at 19:36
  • @Louis I think that falls under the "one-liner" category that I mentioned. Such an answer should really be providing a link to some documentation and describing why mocha --recursive is a solution, and it's very unlikely that Bob and Alice would do that in exactly the same way. – Joshua Taylor Jun 16 '16 at 19:37
  • @JoshuaTaylor Well, yes, it falls under the "one-liner" case that you edited in your comment as I was answering. I certainly would like a link to the documentation but I don't think it is necessary in this case (the documentation of Mocha really adds nothing useful about this specific topic). I know of cases where it is very likely that Bob and Alice would add the same links. (RequireJS has documentation that lends itself to this.) I don't see plagiarism coming in play unless there's an original aspect of an answer that gets duplicated. (e.g. Idiosyncratic comments are a dead giveaway.) – Louis Jun 16 '16 at 19:42
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The tooltips on the answer voting arrows say "This answer is useful" and "This answer is not useful".

An answer that is the same as an existing answer, doesn't say anything that hasn't already been said, and doesn't say it in a clearer way is a waste of everyone's time. It isn't useful.

Downvote away.

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    Should delete votes also be used? – NathanOliver Jun 15 '16 at 12:13
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    @NathanOliver: once the score on the answer is negative, a delete vote is appropriate. A comment is a good idea too — "this answer does not add any new information compared with the accepted answer" or something similar. There only needs to be one such comment, not one per person down-voting. This is applicable to answers added days after the original answers were added. When the time lapse between answers is shorter, then sometimes the answerer was simply not the FGITW, which isn't something that should necessarily be penalized. – Jonathan Leffler Jun 15 '16 at 14:42
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    @JonathanLeffler Definitely. A couple answers a posted in minutes of each other should really not be considered being answered at different times. Thanks. – NathanOliver Jun 15 '16 at 15:02
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    @JonathanLeffler" once the score on the answer is negative, a delete vote is appropriate." - I would argue that is a bad idea holistically as there are many cases where I learn from negative answers. They may suggest something that is a dangerous solution and a comment explains why; I may have never knew why that solution was dangerous if the answer is just deleted. – mattLummus Jun 15 '16 at 16:13
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    @mattLummus : The starting point here is an answer that is added late and merely replicates the information in other answers. Such answers are different from what you describe. – Jonathan Leffler Jun 15 '16 at 16:24
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I declined your flag, because I couldn't find an existing answer which posed the same solution as the answer you flagged.

There may (I don't know enough bash to know) be a duplicate answer once any redundant commands/ superfluous arguments are removed from the solution; but the fact those commands/ arguments exist are enough in my eyes to make the answers different, as each author were posting (in their minds) unique answers.

In general, I will only remove "duplicate" answers when the solutions are exactly the same, and when the explanations (if provided) are also the same.

I (and I'm sure other moderators) also appreciate it when you tell us which answer the post you're flagging is a duplicate of. When I come across a flag "this is a duplicate of another answer" on a 30+ answer question, I'm just going to decline it.


To be clear; moderators will delete duplicate answers, providing they fit the criteria; but in this instance, I didn't think the answer you flagged did.

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    Factoring out the useless use of cat the answer is exactly equivalent to the one currently listed adjacent to it (in "active" view). – tripleee Jun 16 '16 at 5:08
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    Thanks for stopping by an explain the reasoning behind the declined flag. It was my fault assuming it was obvious they were exact duplicates, since they are not but one is just a bad version of the original, as @tripleee states. Good thing is that I got the confirmation that moderators can take care of this. Many thanks! – fedorqui Jun 16 '16 at 7:38
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    @tripleee: The need to factor out the useless use of cat makes it different to the answer you claim it to be equivalent to. If the use of cat is useless, then as Quentin says, downvote (and comment) away; but it will not be deleted by a custom "this is a duplicate" mod flag. – Matt Jun 16 '16 at 9:17

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