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Edit: Please read the whole post first before dupe voting, I am NOT asking about how to deal with unhelpful comments or if they should be flagged - this is about a specific type of scenario/user behaviour and if the expectation should be set in the culture of SO to prevent the comments in the first place.


void HelpOnQuestion(string question)
{
    Google.Search(question);
    var SiteToTry = Google.TopResult(); // stackoverflow.com

    SiteToTry.AskMyQuestion = question;
    SiteToTry.Response = 'Why don't you google ' + HelpOnQuestion(question);
}

I recently came across what I believe to be a perfectly legitimate question (deliberately not linking to avoid Meta effect) on which an experienced user suggested in a comment that the answer could be found online by using a very popular search engine that rhymes with 'Dougal'.

For those of you that need a hand with that one:

Google

I then looked at the user's profile and noticed that quite a few of their comments followed this theme - even though the user is very well-versed in the language being asked about.

My issue here is that realistically, 99% of the questions that get asked on this site could probably be solved by extensive use of a popular search engine and a lot of trial and error - but the questioner decided to come here for help - shouldn't we be mindful of this in our approach? After all - they probably ended up here from a search engine!(By 'help', I mean the question explained what the OP was trying to achieve and had an MCVE, not "I am new to FooBar, gimme teh Fooz".)

I'm not asking how to deal with unhelpful comments; that's been asked a million times already - I just want to generate some discussion here from the community:

1. Should we discourage these comments when the OP has made reasonable effort?

2. Do such comments actively harm the likelihood of a new user staying here and contributing back to the community?

  • 6
    Flag it as "unhelpful" and move on. If the answer could have been found with a quick google search then arguably it probably doesn't belong here...or is a dupe anyway. SO is the last place to ask questions...not the first. – Paulie_D Jun 13 '16 at 20:06
  • @Paulie_D I'm not asking how to deal with unhelpful comments - I'm asking about these particular style of comments on questions that are actually valid questions. – Sam Jun 13 '16 at 20:07
  • 1
    I'm not sure what you will gain, you can't stop bad comments any more than you can stop bad questions. Use the tools available and that's all you can do. – Paulie_D Jun 13 '16 at 20:11
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    @Paulie_D I'm not trying to gain anything personally - but as a community, we do a good job on making known what is expected without having to put it into formal rules. If this is something that should be discouraged (which is what is up for discussion) then this could provide a good bit of discussion to refer to in the future and perhaps provide a bit of a culture shift. – Sam Jun 13 '16 at 20:16
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    Regarding the pseudo-code in the question: you're missing the for (var i = 0; i < Google.NumberOfResultsOnPage(1); i++) { Me.TryExplanationOnResult(i); } :P – Heretic Monkey Jun 13 '16 at 20:17
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    @MikeMcCaughan I know, I was going to post a question on SO about how to do that, but someone suggested Googling it instead. *tut* – Sam Jun 13 '16 at 20:20
  • @femtoRgon I'm not asking about how to deal with these comments, or if they should be flagged. – Sam Jun 13 '16 at 20:30
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    @MacroMan - Perhaps I'm missing some subtle nuance you see in what you've written, but I read it completely, and your question seems to amount to: should "google it" comments be discouraged. What am I missing? – femtoRgon Jun 13 '16 at 20:36
  • 1
    This is the reason that links to LMGTFY are forbidden in SO comments. – Renan Jun 13 '16 at 20:37
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    @Renan No, LMGTFY links are forbidden because it's an extremely rude way to convey that information, rather than because that information shouldn't be conveyed. – Servy Jun 13 '16 at 20:38
  • 2
    If the commenter thought the question showed research effort, they wouldn't be leaving a "Google it" comment in the first place, so I don't think that's a significant distinction. – femtoRgon Jun 13 '16 at 20:43
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    I don't see the distinction either. The thought process around "should we flag it" and "should we discourage it" is basically the same. – Martin Smith Jun 13 '16 at 20:44
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    But flagging stuff only succeeds if other members of the community agree. There is no other specific mechanism to express disapproval as a community. If you want a link to point people too there are plenty of arguments against the practice in the dupe. – Martin Smith Jun 13 '16 at 20:49
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    @MacroMan: If you want a meta discussion to discourage something, and your request is closed as a dupe of an existing meta discussion that discourages that thing, I don't see the problem. You got what you wanted! – Nathan Tuggy Jun 13 '16 at 21:16
  • 1
    Those comments are as useful as this question IMHO – Just Do It Jun 13 '16 at 21:51
29

My issue here is that realistically, 99% of the questions that get asked on this site could probably be solved by extensive use of a popular search engine and a lot of trial and error

That sounds a bit high, by a few percent, but not too far off. I'd go more mid 90's myself.

but the questioner decided to come here for help - shouldn't we be mindful of this in our approach?

No. Research is expected of all users asking questions here. People should not be asking questions easily found with a simple web search.

Should we discourage these comments when the OP has made reasonable effort?

You're free to disagree with the user over whether the person has made a reasonable research effort, but just as you're free to express your opinion that they have done a reasonable amount of research, the other user is free to (politely) express their opinion if they feel someone hasn't done sufficient research effort.

Do such comments actively harm the likelihood of a new user staying here and contributing back to the community?

Probably. Some people find it unreasonable that the site would expect them to, god forbid, actually run their own question through Google before posting it. If they're consistently told that they're not asking appropriate questions when they consistently ask inappropriate questions, they might leave. Such is the price of having quality standards; some people can't or won't meet them.

Of course, when you consistently ignore the quality standards and/or prevent people from enforcing them, you drive away the active subject matter experts by making the site intolerable to them with all of the trash. SO has the traffic and market share that it does because it made itself attractive to subject matter experts, and it did that, in large part, by striving to uphold a high standard of quality for questions, rather than catering to the people trying to ask garbage questions (as all of its competitors had been doing before it, and as most continue to do).

  • This provides a very important insight actually - thinking about it from the SMEs perspective rather than bowing to the needs of the asker all the time... – Sam Jun 13 '16 at 20:22
  • Also, I think so far you are the only person that actually understood the context of my question and provided the kind of discussion I was aiming for. Alas, now it is closed *le sigh* – Sam Jun 13 '16 at 20:57
  • I'd love it if there were some way to force people to Google a solution before asking on SO, but alas that isn't possible. I'm more than happy to drive away these "lazy" users too. The ones that stick around will either continue to ask bad questions and get banned or become a positive contribution to the site. For me, it's a win-win situation. – DavidG Jun 13 '16 at 21:20
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Snotty comments should be discouraged or deleted. Users of all skill levels should be welcome here, and not have to worry about being bullied and condescended to. As geeks, we should recall from middle school that having to watch our backs all the time does not encourage learning, brainstorming and open dialogue.

If you suspect someone is asking you to do their homework, don't do it for them, but give them the benefit of the doubt and point them in the right general direction, or provide constructive, positive tips on how they might find the answers on their own.

One of the best ways to learn something is to explain it. I've learned a lot by answering real life questions, including many on this site. If you think it's beneath your skill level--or even the average skill level of this site--feel free to move on, and leave it to those of us who would like to give it a go.

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    So has quality standards for questions, among them is an expectation of research effort. Your assertion that the quality of a question is irrelevant is explicitly in violation of SO's rules. learning, brainstorming and open dialogue. These are not what SO is for. It's a place to get specific answers to specific questions; it's not a place to brainstorm, have open dialogs, or ask questions trivially answered by a web search. – Servy Jun 13 '16 at 23:59
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    When i was learning coding, a teacher told me HOW to use Stack... It DEFINITELY is a place where you have to watch your back (not because people are bad... Because Stack has quality standards and the community upholds them) Stack was never meant for any of the things you think it's meant for. It's a repository of knowledge, always thinking of the next user. With that in mind, asking a question that i can litteraly copy paste to Google to get an answer is just disrespectful. – Patrice Jun 14 '16 at 2:04

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