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Greater reputation, innumerable badges, and the related profile paraphernalia although are good representing maturity and experience on the SE site, it doesn't always implies the person to be a subject matter expert in context of the question being asked.

Most would infer the above statement as wrong. However, the truth is he may be expert in his top tags domain, and the question might be in some other tag context in which he might be an amateur. Most top users earn their reputation from just 20% of the tags they have totally posted, following Pareto's 80/20 principle. So, they may be expert in those 20% tags related areas only and an amateur in the remaining 80% areas is a general public perception.

It is often asked in chess, that does the personality of the opponent player has any influence on their game plan, the answer is almost yes for all grandmasters. Most also feel uncomfortable playing against Computer as a competitor in chess even if it's radically low-rated running at 1/10th of its strength. Why, because people lose, not because that they are weak players but because of the inherent psychology involved that "computers make no mistakes". On the other hand, low-rated players often lose quickly when they know before-hand that the opponent player is a grandmaster. However, if the opponent rating is unknown, he tends to a better play, and even a long shot at winning it.

The same psychology applies when you are answering a question from a newbie low-rated poster or you improvise your answer if asked by a high-rated SE user. Since SE is a multi-user platform, the current 'mood' of the people as formed by comments, upvotes, etc tend to cloud the actual answer forming a sort of prejudice for future readers.

And, considering the vast amount of questions and a greater multitude of answers being posted, the onus of selecting the correct answer lies in the feeble hands of a naive user, as often clouded in misjudgment, tends to prejudice the answer by the high-ranker to be the correct one, when an equally similar answer is provided by a low-ranked author.

Most of the new users would come to SE to ask some naive question, most probably already answered beforehand, or available on a simple google search. However, what they want is that the answer is tailor-made to suit their needs. This is where the high-ranking-web-mistress with her quick witty words steals the show in a few simple words, backed by equal cheerings and upvoting by her cabalistic fans. While all this time, the low-ranked answerer who prepares a well-researched and explanatory answer doesn't get his answer as accepted.

There are also times when a user becoming extremely hysterical seeing a answer or a shady comment from a high-ranker on his or her post. This often results in the rich getting richer with higher reputation on having accepted answers, and the poor keep remaining poor continuing the vicious cycle.

The stupidity of the people (although passionate) over tiny bits of virtual points overwhelms me. Whether you are rated 1b or 64k makes no difference, its the same as either fits in the same 16-bit space, which is nothing but a number pumped-up highly using simple regenerative community feedback. In other words, once you have attained a certain threshold of points and spent enough years serving se-web-inmates-cum-refugees, the formula for compound interest sets in taking your points exponentially high without you having to do anything, it just requires one initial investment.

All this publicity, flattery and greasing with a virtual adornment of badges and reputations is unnecessary. I wish I could donate my points to somebody else in need. I see a case being made on the terms "Can you confidently identify all by yourself the correct answer listed in front of you without looking at any comments or up-votes or the answerer profile?". Can you? If you can, then yes surely I feel you would agree with me on this feature. If you can't and are dependent on other people comments and feeds, you have every right to downvote. The site should be simple with no show-off's. I often feel people come here only looking for quick answers. Truth-seekers are becoming a lost race it seems.

int detect_bias(&user_individual_vote) {
    if check_flag(visual_cheating_detected) {
        if check_type("user_has_pre_info_about_upvotes_and_answerer_reps")
            if check_socio_psychological_influence == high
                bias = check_user_conforms ? wrong_fact : precise_fact   
        if check_type("upvoted")
            mark("The user has blindly upvoted an already upvoted answer");
    return bias;
}

It would be for the greater good of the community if SE allows the new learners to make more mistakes, like selecting a wrong answer, and finding out later that they were wrong? This way I think the learner can learn more and take more than what the site currently offers in terms of knowledge. Therefore, I propose the following model which should be implemented on SE:

Existing_Current_Question_Model

  • Previous answers with previous upvotes are viewable by default
  • Reputation & Badges are visible by default
  • User can upvote with full pre-hand information

Proposed_Test_Mode_Question_Model

  • Previous answers & previous upvotes are NOT visible by default you are encouraged to write your own answers
  • Reps & Badges are NOT visible by default
  • If user selects to see previous answers, he is able to but without the reps & badges or upvotes enabled.
  • To view upvotes, he has to enable it explicitly
  • To view reps & badges, he has to enable it explicitly
  • The user can upvote with or without knowing the existing answerer's reps or badges.
  • You can even have a one-click button to enable ALL if desired

I applaud that you are trying to build a tree of knowledge here on SE, and the Lady Justice being blind, my assertion is that henceforth for any question asked by the poster, the reputations, badges, and up-votes should remain hidden, unless the poster accepts the answer.

Upvotes are a great time-saver. You can conform to other people opinions without having to get to the facts. New users who try to answer to a question already answered by a se-mistress, are somewhat dissuaded to write their own answer, as reason is always weak where prejudice (in the form of upvotes) is strong.

Once the answer is accepted, he can view the profile along with reputation and badges of the answerer like other normal users. I request that this feature is included in all SE sites, to make the tree stronger by watering it with honest answers.

PS: This little change is not going to uproot the tree.

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    Yeah. "On posts tagged feature-request, voting may indicate agreement or disagreement with the proposed change" - from the tag wiki. – vaultah Jun 10 '16 at 15:21
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    "the onus of selecting the correct answer lies in the feeble hands of a naive user" That's why we give a s**t about acceptance marks, it's the upvotes from the community what count's for making a good answer. Which is the accepted one, doesn't have a real meaning for future researchers hitting the post. It's arguable, if the accept feature should exist at all on the site. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 10 '16 at 16:07
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    @manavm-n Well, rep and badges actually are good indicators for the seriousness and quality of an answer, these don't come from nowhere. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 10 '16 at 16:34
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    Do you have any evidence whatsoever that users judgement is clouded by reputation and badges? – Bill the Lizard Jun 10 '16 at 17:58
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    That's an awful answer, and people flagged it as such despite the upvotes it got. That's a sign that people aren't having their judgement clouded by fake internet points. The system worked. – Bill the Lizard Jun 11 '16 at 12:13
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    An upvoted accepted answer is never automatically deleted by the system software. People have to flag it, or the author or a moderator have to step in and delete it. – Bill the Lizard Jun 11 '16 at 13:33
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    Your question contains various logical fallacies. The major one being the simple oversight that users with high reputation apparently are good at what they're doing: providing high-quality answers that other people find upvote-worthy. Their trail of answers also isn't a "one-time investment" as you claim, but years and years of posting answers. – CodeCaster Jun 13 '16 at 12:16
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    @manavm-n the existing answer quotes various parts of your original question. Removing those quotes makes the answer seem not to address the question. When editing the question if you invalidate the answer in this way your edits will be rolled back. – Robert Longson Jun 13 '16 at 15:26
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    Well, after your eidit your proposal even doesn't give any reason why this should be a good thing and how that would improve the site. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 13 '16 at 15:26
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    Please don't attempt to "destroy" your posts by removing their content. There is nothing to be gained by deleting the entire body of the post, all you're doing is rendering the rest of the discussion around the question less meaningful. – meagar Jun 13 '16 at 16:13
  • This is just a great snippet: equally similar answer. – Mad Physicist Jun 13 '16 at 18:24
19

Greater reputation, innumerable badges, and the related profile paraphernalia although are good representing maturity and experience on the SE site, it doesn't implies the person to be a subject matter expert in context of the question being asked.

Usually these people won't write answers outside of their expertise. (May be you should give us some example posts to approve such cases).

And, considering the vast amount of questions and a greater multitude of answers being posted, the onus of selecting the correct answer lies in the feeble hands of a naive user, as ofter clouded in misjudgement, tends to prejudice the answer by the high-ranker to be the correct one, when an equally similar answer is provided by a low-ranked author.

  1. You cannot really read people's minds and what made the OP accepting an answer as the most helpful one for them.
  2. As mentioned in my comment the acceptance mark is of less importance than seeing the score of an answer. If researchers find it useful to solve their problem, it will be constantly upvoted in the long term (I've got a nice sample from my own portfolio here).

This often results in the rich getting richer with higher reputation on having accepted answers, and the poor keep remaining poor continuing the vicious cycle.

Devil s**ts on the biggest heap, it was always like that. Seems to be a natural law (and keep in mind you cannot get rich here simply from heritage).


After all, if we leave aside the accepted mark feature (which isn't very significant as mentioned), the badges and reputation actually are good indicators for quality, confidence and value of most posts.

So I don't see any good reason to hide these.

  • @manavm-n "new user who just joined the site would be a futile attempt" You probably misunderstood. I didn't say that new users answers are inherently bad or futile. The 1st judgement still it the posts content. I just mentioned that badges and reputation are good indicators for confidence and quality. That doesn't mean there aren't bad edge cases, where these criteria will contradict.. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 10 '16 at 17:39
  • @manavm-n "that you then being elite high-reputation class can't ask simple naive questions on the site" Most of these are attempts for canonicals and are self answered anyway. Also keep in mind at what point of time these questions were asked, the quality policies significantly changed since the early days of Stack Overflow. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 10 '16 at 17:53
  • I do get annoyed when i see this one user in particular who has 10k+ rep, gained almost entirely through asking easily researched jquery/php questions. but, that's an outlier. – user400654 Jun 10 '16 at 18:05
  • @KevinB The jquery/php tags have way smaller sharks in their tanks. Seems like the tags themselves involve some low quality experience for research. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 10 '16 at 18:09
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    @manavm-n: I feel perfectly comfortable asking questions that other people might find easy, so long as I've done suitable research. I feel no stigma in that. Just because I haven't asked nearly as many questions as I've answered doesn't mean I feel uncomfortable asking questions - your logic is flawed. – Jon Skeet Jun 11 '16 at 6:45
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    @manavm-n: If a question can be reasonably easily answered by searching and research, then no-one should be asking it, regardless of their reputation. If you're saying that having a high reputation just makes people put some effort in before asking questions, that seems to me to be a good thing, and something to be encouraged in all users regardless of rep. – Jon Skeet Jun 11 '16 at 7:10
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    @manavm-n: But a question which could easily be answered with a bit of research isn't a quality question, IMO. This doesn't mean I haven't asked questions - but I always put time in beforehand. Often that effort resolves the problem without a question being required. That's a good thing. None of that is based on my reputation. – Jon Skeet Jun 11 '16 at 8:50
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    @manav: Good questions that can't easily be answered with a bit of research, yes. But not lazy questions. Why would we want to suggest that it's not worth researching problems? – Jon Skeet Jun 11 '16 at 10:30
  • @manav: You're ignoring my point, which is that your claim that high rep would stop people posting questions seems incorrect to me. If you're basically anti-rep completely, it seems you should say that in your question... Anyway, as you can see, it looks like the community disagrees with you. – Jon Skeet Jun 11 '16 at 10:56
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    @manav: You're confusing correlation and causation. Yes, high rep users tend to be massively more answering than asking. That doesn't support your claim that that's because they have high rep. – Jon Skeet Jun 11 '16 at 11:07
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    @manav: Again, I see no evidence of that. I merely see people who are likely to be capable of researching issues themselves, and therefore in less need of asking. Anyway, I think we're done here. I don't see either of us persuading the other any time soon. – Jon Skeet Jun 11 '16 at 11:13
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    Wow! Judging by the fact the name @JonSkeet is reputable and he sure has a lot of comment up votes, maybe we should consider hiding his username! – Insane Jun 13 '16 at 12:35
  • Example of answering outside of "expert in topic": stackoverflow.com/questions/27920521/weird-generics-error/… :P – Ven Jun 13 '16 at 14:51

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