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Some months ago I posted an answer, which was accepted by the OP. Now another user with a similar (but fundamentally different) problem keeps commenting that my answer is wrong, because it doesn't work in his case. I have tried to explain the difference between the question and his problem in several comments, but he just doesn't seem to understand. Now he's getting argumentative and posting "warnings" to future readers that the answer is wrong.

Is there anything I could do to defuse this situation, or should I just ignore it and move on?


UPDATE: Apparently someone with the power to do so cleaned up the comments; thanks for that.
And someone (presumably the user in question) gave the answer a downvote; it's my first after one year on SO, so I guess that's not bad.

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    Would you mind to link the specific example. I'm afraid that's not answerable in general. You might try to flag such comments as unconstructive. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 8 '16 at 13:53
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    Suggest that he asks his own question. He could include details that he's tried your answer and it doesn't work to ensure it doesn't get closed as a duplicate. – Robert Longson Jun 8 '16 at 13:56
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    Provided that you've explained yourself reasonably and detailed the differences (as you've said), future readers will come to the conclusion that he's wrong anyway. I wouldn't worry. – I am Monica Jun 8 '16 at 13:56
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    @RobertLongson In my last comment I did indeed suggest he ask his own question. I can only hope he'll do so and that will be the end of it. – m69 ''snarky and unwelcoming'' Jun 8 '16 at 14:34
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    I'd also flag the "warning" comments as "Not constructive"...or something. – Paulie_D Jun 8 '16 at 14:39
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    Quote: "I'm looking for something similar". That's where it started and that's where it should have ended right away. Never fall into that trap, always flag as "not constructive" immediately. – Hans Passant Jun 8 '16 at 14:50
  • @πάνταῥεῖ I didn't link to the answer to avoid the meta effect (which could possibly irritate the other user further), but I just received new upvotes for the answer, so apparently some people managed to find it :-) – m69 ''snarky and unwelcoming'' Jun 8 '16 at 14:57
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    @m69 The meta effect won't hit back if you're actually innocent. "which could possibly irritate the other user further" Just leave a comment there that this is actually discussed on meta. But there's no much need to worry about a comment. The users rep won't be affected by deletion. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jun 8 '16 at 15:02
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    The only thing to consider is if it is plausible to arrive to the same question with problem that new user come than edit in specific clarification that your answer applies to specific case of this question (like "This answer applies to case when moon is full, otherwise ask different q/look at...") – Alexei Levenkov Jun 8 '16 at 15:07
  • @HansPassant Would immediately flagging this sort of comment not add to the deluge of flags that moderators already have to deal with? I asked about it here because I wasn't sure how to best handle the situation, but it wasn't a huge problem that needed to be dealt with urgently. – m69 ''snarky and unwelcoming'' Jun 8 '16 at 19:20
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    Don't worry about that. The cleanup job only gets bigger anyway when you don't flag. – Hans Passant Jun 8 '16 at 20:01
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    Dont feed the Troll! – Andrew Day Jun 9 '16 at 10:09
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  1. Explain how the commentor's question is different than the OP.
  2. Encourage the user (if they can't figure out how to solve their problem) to post a new question. (I would probably also point them to the help pages on this, just in case).
  3. Stop interacting on that topic.
  4. If necessary, raise flags appropriately.

It sounds like you already did #1.
At this point, if you did not do #2, don't worry about it.
This puts you at #3.
Be sure to flag all issues as appropriate to avoid further problems in the future and to help discourage this behavior.

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Ignore it and move on. You've already explained the difference between your question and their problem. Readers will understand, or not, as they see fit.

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