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I recently flagged a bounty question which asks for the "best way" to accomplish an open-ended task which is (in my opinion) too broad and not a specific-enough programming question. The opinion-based part of the question has been removed, but I still feel that this question is too broad because it shows an image of an existing application and asks "how do I build this?"

The flag was declined:

declined - I don't see enough to override the bounty here, particularly as people have provided good answers in response to the bounty.

Providing "good answers" to a question does not change the quality of the question. Doesn't this go against the idea that users should not answer questions that should be closed in the first place? Why should bounty questions that have the potential to be exempt from closing even if they have "good" answers?

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    Because of pearls? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ – Andras Deak Jun 6 '16 at 17:17
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    The question isn't too broad or off topic, it's relatively simple and IS a duplicate, at least in the sense of the op simply needs to use a throttle or debounce on the input event (i haven't looked for a swift dupe). is it poorly researched? low quality? probably both, but that's not a close reason. – Kevin B Jun 6 '16 at 20:58
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    @KevinB I disagree. The question is off topic because it asks for the " best way" to accomplish this task (POB). It is too broad because the question is just a screenshot that asks "how do I build this." – JAL Jun 6 '16 at 21:11
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    we'll just have to agree to disagree. – Kevin B Jun 6 '16 at 21:26
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    Can you explain why you think the question is off-topic? You know, other than the fact that the use of the word "best" makes your trigger finger itchy? It looks like a pretty concrete, real-world problem to me. The answer does not, in general, redeem the question, but in this case it puts the lie to your claim that it is "too broad" and not answerable. – Cody Gray Jun 7 '16 at 5:52
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    @CodyGray "too broad" does not mean "not answerable." Off-topic questions are answered all of the time. To me, this question shows a screenshot of an existing app and asks "how do I build this?" Traditionally, those kinds of questions are closed as too broad or lacks MCVE. – JAL Jun 7 '16 at 11:39
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    You are mixing up a bunch of different close reasons and their rationale. Questions closed as "too broad" are not the same as questions closed as "off topic". The title here says "off topic", but then your attempt at an explanation is that the question is "too broad and not a specific-enough programming question." The problem with questions that are "too broad", as stated in the close reason, is: "There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format." So yeah, the principal issue with questions that are "too broad" is that they are "not answerable." – Cody Gray Jun 7 '16 at 11:45
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    I also disagree with your characterization of the question. It appears that you are getting hung up on the screenshot. Granted, it was ridiculously ginormous. That was rightfully fixed. But even in the original revision, the question part seems pretty clear to me: "i am making request everytime a user type something ... How to cancel the previous request when user types another character" Forgiving the bad grammar and the egregious lack of a question mark, this seems neither off-topic nor too broad. What help would an MCVE really provide in this case? – Cody Gray Jun 7 '16 at 11:47
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    @CodyGray Again, there are too many ways to answer that question? Are they using AlamoFire? NSOperstionQueue? GCD? NSURLSession? The question of "how do I cancel a previous request" is open ended. – JAL Jun 7 '16 at 11:53
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    @JAL there are too many ways to answer 90% of the questions here by that argument. You're trying to turn "Too Broad" into the old "Not Constructive" or "can't comprehend" close reason. – Kevin B Jun 7 '16 at 15:31
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    @Kevin: "there are too many ways to answer 90% of the questions here by that argument" -- sounds about right. The vast majority of questions being posted should be closed. And indeed, a large number are. The remaining fail to be, because there are enough people willing to jump and answer with a guess at what the question author wants rather than performing more useful moderating duties (like finding duplicates or using other good close-vote choices like "too broad" and "primarily opinion based"). I suspect a combination of laziness and chasing reputation points drives this behavior. – Peter Duniho Jun 7 '16 at 15:55
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    Let me offer a bit of wisdom which I find helps me in dealing with declined flags and questions I've voted-to-close that never get seem to get closed, despite the fact that they clearly and obviously deserve to be not just closed, not just deleted, but permanently consigned to the nether-most regions of gosh-darn-it-all-to-heck, they and their so-totally-screwed up authors who I just wish would some day, please God, I swear I've been good - or at least that I'll never do it again - probably - get a clue (yes, that does make sense - read it again) - "F*ck it, Dude, let's go bowling". – Bob Jarvis Jun 7 '16 at 16:29
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    @Kevin: "those aren't too broad, they are unclear" -- "those"? Which are you speaking of, specifically? My comment simply addresses the general problem of low quality posts. This includes "unclear" and "too broad". But yes, if a question is stated so vaguely that while the intended goal is clear, there can be many questions depending on e.g. what other components and/or frameworks are in use, the question is "too broad", just as JAL suggests. That there are many such questions doesn't in any way suggest we should ignore them and let them stay open. – Peter Duniho Jun 7 '16 at 18:49
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    @KevinB how can you delete a non-closed question? – Braiam Jun 8 '16 at 18:30
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I declined that flag, for the reason given. I'll quote an answer I've previously written about this:

If you come across a very clearly off topic or otherwise terrible question that is entirely being propped up by a bounty, you can use an "other" flag and describe why the bounty should be removed so the question could be closed. Moderators have the ability to refund bounties and make the question able to be closed again.

However, I should caution that we only do this in the most obvious of cases, and when the bounty was issued also plays into this. If the question is borderline or otherwise wouldn't be something I'd immediately close on sight, I tend to let the bounty run its course and have the community vote on it after that. Similarly, if a bounty has existed on a question for more than a day or so, and people have started answering the question as a result of the bounty being there, I become even more hesitant to remove it.

In this case, I saw no obvious need to intervene and single-handedly close that question. It wasn't clearly off topic (despite your assertion), it was a programming question asking for a way to accomplish a specific task. Could it have shown more effort, been better written, or incorporated the technology restrictions from the tags in the question? Maybe, but it didn't strike me as something in need of immediate closure.

At least one person had given a good answer in the hopes of winning the bounty, and to remove it would be pulling the rug out from underneath them. There just wasn't enough there to motivate me to step in, remove the bounty, and close the question, so I elected to let it run its course.

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    I appreciate your response. I think the problem here is that the decision to close an off-topic bounty question is subjective and differs from mod-to-mod. We pull the rug under FGITW users every day by closing off-topic regular questions. Bounty questions are special and require even more delicate attention. – JAL Jun 6 '16 at 17:31
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    @JAL Closing is not a means to "pull the rug [out from] under FGITW users." It is to correct questions that have shown either a lack of clearness or that they wouldn't fit on the site. – hichris123 Jun 6 '16 at 17:44
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    @hichris123 you're right, but it is a byproduct. Closing a bounty question is not a means to "pull the rug [out from] under FGITW users" either. It's to close questions that are not a good fit for Stack Overflow. – JAL Jun 6 '16 at 19:04
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    I still see this as more of a failure on the part of us as the community. We didn't close it when we had the opportunity to before the bounty was applied. To elaborate on @JAL s point, does the fact that we missed our opportunity to close it mean that it then becomes exempt from our normal quality standards because that bounty was applied? – krillgar Jun 7 '16 at 12:10
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    The OP has a pretty strong claim of course, it the question wasn't off topic for two days then it doesn't make much sense that it is suddenly off topic just because he put a bounty on it. The kind of claim that's likely to sway a mod. The big picture that this is the kind of throttling that is needed to get the drastic mismatch between the number of questioners and answerers to balance. You can only get your crappy question answered if you have enough rep for a bounty :) – Hans Passant Jun 7 '16 at 12:54
  • I find the downvotes here misguided. I assume they relate to a disagreement regarding the close-worthiness of the post in question, but surely this answer is useful and correct, being written by the one person in the world who could address the specific scenario. – Peter Duniho Jun 7 '16 at 16:04
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    That said, the post in question's a classic example of why "too broad" questions should be closed. Even before the bounty was posted, there was an answer that's now highly up-voted. But guess what? The question author does not find it detailed enough. In spite of his remarkably unspecific question. The SO community could (and may well still) waste a great deal of time trying to guess at exactly what would satisfy the author of the question. To paraphrase what @Hans said, SO often is able to get rid of bad questions like this one, except when the author has enough reputation to block that. – Peter Duniho Jun 7 '16 at 16:04
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    @PeterDuniho On meta, downvotes on answers often indicate disagreement with their proposed action, not necessarily feelings of unhelpfulness. Since there is a subjective element to the answer (ie, regarding how/if bounties should impact close flags), downvotes almost certainly imply disagreement with that. Personally, I'd say a bounty ought to have zero impact on if a question is suited for the site. Leaving them open just enables abuse of bounties. It's impossible to claim this post is not helpful in the given context, though. – user3995702 Jun 7 '16 at 16:33
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    The problem is that when I post a flag I don't know if a stellar answer is going to be posted just minutes after. The problem with flagging bounties, in general, is that people are constantly being punished for not knowing that it would take ages to handle the flag, or for not including an important detail they didn't know the moderator wouldn't know. – John Dvorak Jun 7 '16 at 16:38
  • The question itself does not seem bad, but its answers imply an indirect duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/4220126/… – Ryan Jun 7 '16 at 16:40
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    @JanDvorak additionally, the action taken from mod-to-mod differs. I've flagged bounty questions with 7 days left just to be declined by a mod hours before the bounty expiration (which is a different issue on how quickly flags are handed). I've also seen mods handle these flags as helpful. There is no unified stance on closing bounty questions, it differs depending on the mod handling the flag. – JAL Jun 7 '16 at 16:40
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    Just because the question wasn't closed before the bounty was added does not mean that it is not off-topic. It just means it slipped through the cracks of community moderation. Adding a Bounty does not change the quality of the question, it just makes it harder to moderate (re Hans). – JAL Jun 7 '16 at 16:43
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    I think Shog9's answer to How can I close a question that has an active bounty? sums up reasoning here quite nicely – psubsee2003 Jun 7 '16 at 17:47
  • @JAL - Every case is different, and moderators are people. Same with every other kind of flag we handle. There isn't a concrete flowchart that we consult to produce a yes / no decision, it's a judgment call on each of these. I personally apply a high threshold to the removal of a bounty, but I've also had complaints lodged against me when I did remove a bounty for "being reckless" in doing so and in the process angering both the asker and answerers. Removal of a bounty is an exceptional circumstance, and each instance will be different. – Brad Larson Jun 7 '16 at 17:53
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    "The OP has a pretty strong claim of course, it the question wasn't off topic for two days then it doesn't make much sense that it is suddenly off topic just because he put a bounty on it." Leaving this particular question aside, I don't find that to be a strong claim in general: the bounty was placed because the question didn't get the attention it needed to receive a satisfactory answer. The same lack of attention affects close votes being cast. "Was ignored for two days" ≠ "is not off-topic". @HansPassant – Josh Caswell Jun 7 '16 at 18:58
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The point here is that a bounty on a question does raise the bar for closing it. A question that has a bounty on it both has spent some time out in the wild as a question (so wasn't closed as immediately obviously bad), and may have had some effort expended by users to answer. It also requires a moderator to intervene to close it (to remove the bounty).

As such, it is entirely correct that the bar is higher for closure (or, is lower for remaining open) - if for no other reason than it takes more moderator effort (and we shouldn't be using our scarce resources, i.e. moderator time, on closing questions unless it is egregious). The additional elements reinforce that.

I don't think it is the good answer solely that is the reason here, though; a truly terrible question with a good answer might be closed anyway. In this case, it is the combination of the good answer and the bad-but-not-terrible question which means it should be left open. What is a good book on Perl scripting? would still be closed, even if it had a good answer or answers. This question, though, in my opinion is not all that bad - it could be better, certainly better worded if nothing else, but it asks how to accomplish a particular programming task, and in particular how to accomplish a task that might well be desired to be accomplished by many others - meaning this question and the answers it derived likely improved the quality of our database, whether or not the question is truly all that.


On a side note: remember why we close questions. We close questions largely because they are not good enough to be easily answered in a way consistent with our philosophy. While you may believe this question wasn't easily answerable in a way consistent with our philosophy, it did get an answer, and one I would suggest is sufficiently within our site's philosophy. So to that extent, the answer does validate the question - even if it wasn't a question you believe was a good one to start with. Perhaps that is indeed evidence that it was a better question than you thought to begin with.

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    "it did get an answer" -- getting an answer is not proof of value. And indeed, this question now has two answers, neither of which have been accepted by the OP. Maybe there's a good question underlying one or both of those answers, but even if so that question is not the one that is being displayed at the top of the page. Until if and when someone edits the question at the top of the page in a way that supports the given answers, the question still sucks. No number of answers, good or otherwise, will change that. – Peter Duniho Jun 7 '16 at 17:50
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    @PeterDuniho Getting an answer that is consistent with our philosophy, and that a reasonable person might judge to answer the question, does give it some value (imho). Lack of green checkmark is irrelevant. I don't think that's a great question, or even good, but compared to the other questions here I don't see why it's being dumped on so much... it seems pretty clear to me, and the answer (particularly the second answer) looks like a good answer to it to me (I don't know Swift, but I do know Objective C). – Joe Jun 7 '16 at 17:52
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    "bad-but-not-terrible question which means it should be left open" what? I spend less than 10 seconds and found an apparent duplicated of someone that not only showed off his work, but also put a nice enough title that can be found easily stackoverflow.com/q/26305707/792066, and you plan to leave this one go like that? – Braiam Jun 7 '16 at 18:18
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    "some value" -- "some value" is insufficient to keep a question open, especially if that question is really a duplicate. Even if not a duplicate, the question itself needs to be improved before the pair of the question and its answers have enough value to be worth keeping. A good question with a good answer is fine, even if the good answer is not accepted. But a bad question with an answer that may or may not address what the question's author had in mind? Not worth keeping around, bounty or not. – Peter Duniho Jun 7 '16 at 18:39
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I would have been more forgiving of the question if instead of an implementation question ("How I do X?") it was instead a software design question ("Should I do X?"), but in this case, the OP has neither demonstrated enough research that made his question anything novel (there is a question that ask this in the general sense How to cancel on-going HTTP request in Swift? and another using the very same library How to pause/resume/cancel my download request in Alamofire) nor is sufficient clear what is the exact context his problem is (no code). Basically, I find no value of keeping this question on this site and waste of my bandwidth and time.

Can we close this and move on?

  • If only it were that easy. Just flagged this (former) bounty question for closure and it was handled by Brad. Where is the line? – JAL Jun 7 '16 at 20:35
  • One is a slideshow, the other is a debounce. drastic difference in scope. – Kevin B Jun 7 '16 at 20:38
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    @KevinB how do you know? The question shows no code at all. – Braiam Jun 7 '16 at 20:39
  • @KevinB we'll just have to agree to disagree. – JAL Jun 7 '16 at 20:39
  • experience in programming. when you see an input, that upon typing makes a network request, and you want to throttle it, it's a debounce regardless of language. – Kevin B Jun 7 '16 at 20:39
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    "How do i build a slideshow" is far more open-ended than "how do i throttle network requests on my text input" – Kevin B Jun 7 '16 at 20:44
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    @KevinB no, that's just your assumption. You can't base your entire career upon unfounded assumptions, neither can't we. Unless we see the code, and only then, we can, with all certainly, say if it's X or Y, or something entirely different. This question is beyond the point where an educated guess is helpful. – Braiam Jun 7 '16 at 20:46
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I like the reasoning of Brad Larson in his answer,

At least one person had given a good answer in the hopes of winning the bounty, and to remove it would be pulling the rug out from underneath them.

as people have written in good faith and put in effort and it's not fair to punish them by removing the bounty.

Also removing the bounty and refunding the OP is giving them something for nothing. They get multiple answers, from the extra attention and don't lose the rep most people have to pay to get that attention.

My take on refunding bounties is when the questions really are not answerable in a real sense (someone can always post an answer, but it may be meaningless or worthless).

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    Not sure "punish" is the right word here. Reputation should never be used as a determining factor in whether to close/delete a question. These questions should stand on their own merit regardless of bounties. – DavidG Jun 8 '16 at 10:26
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    @DavidG rep is what drives the community and the site. So yes losing rep for effort can be perceived as a punishment. I don't find it useful to debate semantics, it's obvious what I am attempting to express. – Yvette Colomb Jun 8 '16 at 10:31
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    I meant that closure shouldn't be seen as a punishment to the people answering, it should only be seen as an appropriate action to take for a question that deserves to be closed. – DavidG Jun 8 '16 at 10:35
  • @DavidG the whole reason it wasn't close was because the mod thought that there were decent answers and it would be penalising users answering in good faith. I just don't want to keep arguing it, I extremely busy. – Yvette Colomb Jun 8 '16 at 10:37
  • I disagree with Brad, but that's just my opinion. And if you don't want to argue, then don't reply, no need to get annoyed with me. – DavidG Jun 8 '16 at 10:39
  • @DavidG I'm not annoyed with you, my tone is brash because I'm extremely busy. so sorry for sounding rude. – Yvette Colomb Jun 8 '16 at 10:49
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"Providing "good answers" to a question does not change the quality of the question."

Exactly, but this doesn't mean what you think it means. The best questions are frequently the ones that are closed as "too broad". Another way of putting this condition is, if the question is one you would ask an SDE I or a college student, then it belongs on Stack exchange. If it is one you would ask a software engineer or a principal engineer it doesn't belong on stack exchange.

Stack exchange is useful for the types of questions it prefers because it saves a few clicks vs finding the reference manual. I am not sure how much of this is real and how much is "google spamming".

"How do I build this?" questions like the one linked to are problematic, but not because they are open-ended - questions like "Which technology frameworks should make my shortlist for building an application with requirements X, Y, Z, and W?" would offer stack exchange the option to actually provide useful information that is not of the "Read the fine manual" sort, and it frequently does, despite the fact that the questions have been closed.

So, to answer the original question, bounty questions should be closed as too general not only because they represent investment, but also because the stack exchange community is hurt by applying to restrictive of filters to all types of questions.

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    "The best questions are frequently the ones that are closed as "too broad"." -- the best questions? No. That claim is so far from the truth, it's laughable. Occasionally a decent question comes along which still winds up being closed as "too broad". But in terms of quality questions fitting the specific Stack Overflow model, a question that is truly too broad is not even close to being among the best questions on the site. (And one should be very careful to not confuse the attention or even positive voting a question might get with quality.) – Peter Duniho Jun 7 '16 at 18:41

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