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This idea has been mentioned in various answers and comments related to low-quality questions. I was prompted to make this post after an off-hand comment of mine received 22 votes.

We have a serious problem with low-quality questions on StackOverflow. Even I, who once prided myself as a "nice-guy", have been running out of flags lately.

This growth of low-quality answers is the Kudzu keeping people from finding good questions, discouraging good answers to those good questions, and running off good users. It's turning those who remain more hostile and hair-triggered than they ought to be. It is, to put it briefly, killing the site.

Downvoting does not discourage users who do not care about reputation or even having their account question-banned. It is far too easy to abusively make new accounts, and I doubt there is much that can be done to prevent that without affecting legitimate users.

Closing questions does not work, because 'gimmie codez' still manage to get their codez in most cases. They might not get what they wanted, but they get more than they probably ought to, if they put absolutely no effort into their question in the first place, and enough to make them want to come back for more.

What we need is a different approach. The solution to help vampirism does not seem to be going after the vampires themselves or their questions; we've done that, it doesn't work. They have nothing to lose.

What we should consider is depriving them of what they want: answers for their off-topic and low-quality questions. To that end I ask:

Should we revert reputation gained from answers when the questioned they are posted on is closed?

It makes little sense to reward users for answering bad questions. Such answers are likely off-topic, too broad, duplicates, or outright copied, just like the questions they respond to. It is hard to write good, generally helpful answers to awful questions. All encouraging it does is send a message that we do answer bad questions, which encourages them to be asked.

To an extent, this already happens. I merely propose it be made systematic. To quote Servy:

As far as help vampires deleting their bad questions as soon as they get an answer; that's why you don't answer bad questions.

By taking away reputation from answers to bad questions, we would also encourage users who do want to write good answers to gray area questions to ask for clarification and edits first. That would do something, whatever small, to mitigate the Fastest Gun in the West phenomena.

Potential problems:

  • It would discourage users from close-voting questions they have answered.
  • It may be open to abuse. For example, close-voting questions where a specific user has a + answer. Detection metrics might need to be added, as it could potentially be abused to effectively serial-downvote.
  • It might intensify close-vote wars, since more people would have something to lose from a question being closed.
  • It could seriously affect people whose reputation was gained from highly up-voted answers on old, now closed, questions. Perhaps such answers could be grandfathered-in. I am not sure if historically-closed questions would necessarily be hit in the first place. It is worth noting many canonical questions already are community-wiki'd.

Potential benefits:

  • It would reduce low-quality question spam.
  • It would reduce the number of low-quality and especially dupliciate answers.
  • It may encourage more users to request question improvements before answering.
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    Note that you already lose reputation on answers to questions that are deleted in a timely manner (can't remember the age cutoff). – Bill the Lizard Jun 3 '16 at 19:41
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    I don't think this would cause a behavioral change; all it really does is reduce the amount of reputation the answerer will receive over time. All they have to do to make up for it is simply answer more questions. They may not get rep, but the asker, the root of the problem, is still getting their question answered. The wrong person is being restricted. – Kevin B Jun 3 '16 at 19:44
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    @KevinB The important point is the reward for answering obviously flag-needing questions would be zero. So they might answer more, but that would still be unrewarding unless they also answered good ones - which would be the proposal, to an extent, working as intended. – user3995702 Jun 3 '16 at 19:46
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    My point isn't about help vampires deleting their own questions, it's about other users who already have the ability to vote to delete bad questions, but don't. – Bill the Lizard Jun 3 '16 at 19:57
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    I don't often vote to delete questions. Not because i don't want to, but because by the time i can, i've already moved on to another question or task. – Kevin B Jun 3 '16 at 19:58
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    @KevinB Exactly. Same here. It's pretty rare that a deletable question gets on my screen. It would be nice if there were a queue for that. (Maybe there is, and I just don't know of it?) – Bill the Lizard Jun 3 '16 at 20:02
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    It might be nice if when one of the questions i've downvoted becomes eligible for deletion, i get a notification that i can now cast a delete vote with a button that'll cast said vote without me losing where i am. similar to the way flags show up in chat. Not sure how annoying it may get though on days where i go through all 40 (or whatever the cap is). – Kevin B Jun 3 '16 at 20:07
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    @BilltheLizard "age cutoff": you lose reputation of posts that aren't at least 6 months old and has score +3 – Braiam Jun 3 '16 at 21:03
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    @BilltheLizard "Maybe there is, and I just don't know of it?" stackoverflow.com/tools?tab=delete&daterange=last30days but three gotchas: the only two methods to filter are by recent and all time delete votes, it can't filter by close reason, nor shows you the post score, can't organize by tags, and it mixes answers and questions. – Braiam Jun 3 '16 at 21:09
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    Hmya, it is a popular idea since it presumably affects the behavior of the people at SO that still act responsibly. Of which there are too few left to manage the flood of crap produced by those who don't by a fat factor of two. It is however only a good way to chase them away, faster than the crap already does. There is some merit in driving this into a more colossal problem than it already is, SE will however never go for it so it is just all rather academic. – Hans Passant Jun 3 '16 at 21:35
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    I sometimes hurry to answer lame questions, and sometimes get no votes for answering. No - this wouldn't put me off. What bugs me is downvotes for "shows no research or is low quality" seem to cost karma - why would I "spend" it on bad questions? Worse, close voting has no "bad question, try harder" option and instead you have to write-in. If downvoting was free and 2-4 quick downvotes on a new account's question, coming from established users, regardless of any upvotes on the question, auto-closed it, that might be fast enough to stop people having any chance to answer. – TessellatingHeckler Jun 4 '16 at 3:58
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    @TessellatingHeckler downvoting questions is free! – alain Jun 4 '16 at 12:10
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    Good questions sometimes also get closed, for example for being high-quality duplicate or good, but too broad, taking away rep from the answerers of those would do more harm than good. However, taking away rep from answers to questions which are closed and downvoted (score <= -3 or something like that) could work. – GingerPlusPlus Jun 4 '16 at 12:25
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    @TessellatingHeckler downvoting answers costs -1 rep, but downvoting questions is free. The owner of the downvoted post gets -2 in both cases. – alain Jun 4 '16 at 12:51
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    I made a sede query to find out how much rep comes from answers of closed question: data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/query/495873/… I hope there is no error! – alain Jun 4 '16 at 13:21
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  • It would reduce low-quality question spam.
  • It would reduce the number of low-quality and especially dupliciate answers.
  • It may encourage more users to request question improvements before answering.

It will do none of these things. Why? Because your fundamental premise is faulty.

People answer low-quality questions all the time, whether it's here on SO or on Reddit or forums across the Internet. Only on SO do they get rep for it, yet those questions still get answered on places where rep is not provided. Why?

Because it's not about the reputation for them.

They want to answer questions, Full Stop. I'm sure some of them want their rep, but the vast majority simply want to answer questions. Whether it's out of wanting to help others, a compulsion to solve problems presented to them, or something else. They want to answer questions.

So long as those questions are presented to them and they are capable of answering, then those questions will attract answers. Depriving the answerers of rep for those questions will in no way aid them.

If you want to stop these questions from being answered, you must stop them from being asked in the first place. That is the only effective way to solve the problem.


  • It may be open to abuse. For example, close-voting questions where a specific user has a + answer. Detection metrics might need to be added, as it could potentially be abused to effectively serial-downvote.

I think you've missed the forest for the trees. It's not a question of serially downvoting someone. It's a question of doing the right thing for the right reasons.

Right now, we have people who disagree with the simple notion of voting for content, not for meta-reasons. There are people who believe that questions which started poor should be downvoted even after they have become better. There are people who believe that answers to bad questions should be downvoted regardless of their quality.

This kind of meta-voting is wrong, and it is against the rules of this site. Having closed questions remove reputation will only make the desire for such meta-voting worse.

Let's say we have a borderline question. By which I mean a question which does not cross any of the actual close vote reasons. It's reasonably focused, it's not opinion-based, it's clear, etc. But it's general quality is not particularly good either. But someone decides to give it a good answer, and several people upvote it.

Now before, Mr. Meta-voter would have just passed on the question. After all, downvoting the single answer will accomplish little in the face of the several upvotes, and closing it will change nothing. But now, he will have an incentive to close it, even though the question doesn't deserve closure. Mr. Meta-voter knows that by closing the question, he gets to completely undo all of that reputation. To him, he's fighting the good fight against a rep-whore.

Remember: we're talking aobut the kind of person who will downvote an answer that shouldn't be downvoted. Why should we expect him to not close-vote a question that should not be closed?

And if you think I'm making something out of nothing, we already have people here who will use an incorrect close vote reason for a question. I have a hard time believing that such people wouldn't be gleefully trying to deny reputation for borderline questions.

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    @WilliamKappler: "How does that make the question any better?" How does it make the question any worse? As the hypothetical states, it is a borderline question. Which means that it doesn't qualify for any of the close vote reasons (otherwise it would be bad). And therefore, closing that question is wrong. – Nicol Bolas Jun 3 '16 at 20:33
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    It seems to me you're making building an argument off of what is a very fringe case: users maliciously voting on borderline questions. I will point out that it still takes several people to close most questions, and closing can still be reversed. It is not as if we don't already have open/close wars. This seems a pointless concern, especially when my answer suggested monitoring for such changes. – user3995702 Jun 3 '16 at 20:38
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    I look at it this way. I don't particularly see your feature request as a bad one or one we shouldn't do; I just don't see it as one that will have the desired effect. – Kevin B Jun 3 '16 at 20:39
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    I also disagree with this: "If you want to stop these questions from being answered, you must stop them from being asked in the first place. That is the only effective way to solve the problem." If you truly believe this, close voting and downvoting might as well be removed from the site. – user3995702 Jun 3 '16 at 20:40
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    @WilliamKappler: "If you truly believe this, close voting and downvoting might as well be removed from the site." The purpose of downvoting is to signal to others that the question isn't worth their time. The purpose of close-voting is to prevent people from posting answers that would be incorrect, attract conversation, or otherwise not be helpful. Your stated purpose is to get people to stop asking bad questions; that's not the purpose of either downvoting or close-voting. – Nicol Bolas Jun 3 '16 at 20:45
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    though... downvoting does help toward that goal. closing, lesser so. – Kevin B Jun 3 '16 at 20:46
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    @NicolBolas I don't think there is zero correlation between people getting helpful (?) answers and them making questions. So discouraging answers to questions we don't want discourages those questions. Same methodology as prosecuting customers in illegal business. – user3995702 Jun 3 '16 at 20:48
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    @WilliamKappler: "I don't think there is zero correlation between people getting helpful (?) answers and them making questions." That's not the correlation that's the problem. Where there is zero correlation is between answers and rep. People will give answers without getting rep; the Internet has proven this. Rep is gratitude, not a reward. – Nicol Bolas Jun 3 '16 at 21:01
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    @NicolBolas Just because people do it without it doesn't mean it doesn't contribute. There are plenty of users obviously motivated by reputation. So claiming "there is zero correlation is between answers and rep" - sorry, no. – user3995702 Jun 3 '16 at 21:04
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    "They want to answer questions" I don't answer reputation because I want to... you have to get me really motivated to make me answer one question, and just the desire of answering you doesn't even makes the cutoff. – Braiam Jun 3 '16 at 21:05
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    Citation needed for voting on answers based on question quality being "against the rules of the site". I don't think that's true. I also find your defense of rep gained by those contributing to a systemic problem … troubling. They are not owed rep for doing bad things to the site. Your initial argument is that while they are harming the site, they can't be demotivated by rep denial. This may or may not be true, but attacking the character of those who disagree with this theory is a bit unfair. – Nathan Tuggy Jun 4 '16 at 0:55
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    @NathanTuggy: "Citation needed for voting on answers based on question quality being "against the rules of the site"." I don't see anything on the site that says that downvote means "answer may be OK, but question is not." I do however see the tooltip on the up and down arrows which talks about the post itself, not about where it is, who made it or anything other than the quality of that post. The answer is either useful or it is not useful. So I would ask the opposite: what evidence do you have that it is OK to vote for any reason other than quality? – Nicol Bolas Jun 4 '16 at 1:23
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    @NathanTuggy: "Would you reject the premise that this would then reduce the amount of bad questions?" Does it matter? I know a much more effective way to reduce the amount of bad questions: stop bad questions from being asked. Stop the problem at its source, and you won't have to debate whether the problem would or would not be stopped. – Nicol Bolas Jun 4 '16 at 1:41
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    @NathanTuggy: Here's my thinking on this. You have two groups: A) people who ask crap questions and B) people who will answer anything. If all our questions were good, having group B around would be fine. This means that group B is only conditionally problematic; they're a problem only so long as group A exists. And the thing is this: everyone agrees that we don't want group A around. So why do we keep focusing on getting rid of group B as some kind of roundabout way to get rid of group A? Group B consists of good people; it's group A that's the real problem. – Nicol Bolas Jun 4 '16 at 1:53
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    @NicolBolas: The problem is that Group B is vastly smaller than Group A (though still quite large), so any longer-term (dis)incentives can have a chance to work over time, rather than requiring everything to operate on the one-and-done, I-just-need-this-by-tomorrow posts Group A drops on us. So a measure that only makes a modest difference per post is far more effective at reducing Group B's size (either by turning them away from the site, which is unfortunate, or making them more selective, which is ideal) than even a measure that has a larger influence per post on Group A. – Nathan Tuggy Jun 4 '16 at 1:57
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A thought experiment might be handy here. Suppose we implemented this. How many new complaints, rants, and vows to "abandon SO now that it's finally jumped the shark and become totally elitist" would we get on Meta from answerers who suddenly started losing rep?

That should give a good idea of how many answerers of (mostly) bad questions will be significantly affected by this change. Some of these will undoubtedly stop answering bad questions but keep up with questions that aren't going to be closed. That's ideal. Some won't change their answering habits much at all. That's a wash or a bit of a loss (given the effort to change and the annoyance of handling their Meta whining). Some will stop answering entirely; depending on their ratio of answering good vs bad questions, this may be a small or large loss. Similarly, depending on the numbers in each of this category, the net effect might be positive or negative. I'd hope for positive, but it's worth considering more carefully with statistics.

But anyone who argues that there will be no benefits at all, only losses — that all answerers will continue answering bad questions at the same rate — is completely ignoring the psychological effects of rep loss. It hurts a lot more to receive rep and then have it taken away for bad behavior than it does to have no expectation of any extrinsic reward, and receive none. So this idea is not toothless. Answerers have something to lose.

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    I'm becoming rather annoyed with those who should "know better" (i.e., non-trivial rep.) continually answering bad questions. If the rep is significant, say (far) above 10k, a DV is practically meaningless as nothing will change because of it. – Ðаn Mar 31 '17 at 13:00
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    It might be an interesting experiment to implement something like this on a short-term (say a week or a month) basis and then analyze the results. If nothing else, there would be some hard data, rather than just guesses. – Ðаn May 24 '17 at 14:09

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