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At some point of time, we lost the light and helping people became more important than helping create a library of practical programing answers

This was the most up-voted comment on the top answer to the question, How to lure professionals to Stack Overflow? The question was alright, but what I found really interesting is how the answer pinpointed the fundamental root of the problem we're seeing on SO:

This is an advanced stage in the life cycle of any community, what comes next... isn't good. I don't have the solution here, I don't think anyone on the internet does, if Stack Overflow manages to solve this problem, I'll take my hat off and clap.


Mitigation

It should be pointed out that this core problem is not one you'll solve by small modifications to the system. This is an end-game problem. The boat was designed to sail up a river and we all hopped on and sailed it across the ocean.

So the Stack Exchange team constantly works to improve the system to handle the massive traffic the site gets while maintaining quality, but with a little foresight I think it's clear that these measures aren't solving the problem, they're mitigating it.

Everything I'm seeing posted on meta, is focused on mitigation of current problems. You can only mitigate a problem for so long before things go bad.


I am the problem

I've been on SO for a few years, asking questions. Without SO, I wouldn't have the expertise that I have today. But often times, I recognize that even though my questions are considered "on-topic" and "answerable", I'm gaming the system to get an answer to my problem, without regard for whether my question would be helpful to others. This worked for me time and time again. I got what I wanted, but I knew it wasn't the best thing for SO. So why isn't it against the rules?

Well lets go back to the comment I cited earlier:

At some point of time, we lost the light and helping people became more important than helping create a library of practical programing answers

I think this comment nails it. Stack Overflow should be a tool to create a library of practical programming answers, not a tool to help me with the very specific problem I'm having right now in my code.

Let's be clear: I should be able to get help with the problem I'm having, but the way my question is processed should be different and I should be expected to use fundamental information to solve my specific problem, rather than get teh codez. In terms of this quest to create a library of practical programming answers, as the question asker I have one job: Either write down an original programming question, or more likely, write down one of the 10,000 ways of describing a question that's already been asked and answered. So we have a duplicate system, great.

But wait! The answer to the question you're calling mine a duplicate of doesn't solve my specific problem!

While thousands of question might be duplicates of the same fundamental problem, many of them won't specifically be answered word for word by the original question that they're fundamentally a duplicate of. Because

... helping people became more important that helping create a library of practical programming answers.

we accept questions that are highly specific variations of the same fundamental problems, and many of them are treated as original questions. Because we allow them to be. We allow ME to ask my specific variation of the question and give ME the solution to MY problem. It shouldn't be about ME. A

library of practical programming answers

doesn't have books with pages that are about solving MY specific problem.


The Solution

Put simply, I think the way SO processes questions needs to be reformatted. Rather than allowing me to ask for an answer to my specific variation of a fundamental question, my question should be summarized by an expert. Sometimes I can't see the fundamental root of my question, so I can't be expected to write this "summary" myself, but you guys understand the topic and can pinpoint the fundamental root of my question.

Here's the process I propose:

  1. Question written as usual.
  2. Question will be closed automatically with zero community effort if enough (high rep) users view it without voting it as "acceptable" and a certain time limit passes.
  3. A valid question is voted on-topic. (Meanwhile, 5 other questions were passively assumed off-topic and removed).
  4. An expert summarizes this question, and either votes this fundamental summary as duplicate or original. Once a few votes mark it as duplicate or original, it's either closed as a duplicate or "opened" as original, and answering begins.
  • Define expert. – DavidPostill Jun 2 '16 at 22:25
  • @DavidPostill I'm not qualified to define that. You'll have to decide on a rep threshold. – user5536767 Jun 2 '16 at 22:26
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    but some high rep users are really terrible coders who just copy paste answers to dupe SUPER quickly on high visibility tags, gaining them a bunch of undeserved upvotes. Anyway.... the main problem we have right now is SCALABILITY..... how can a handful of experts maintain the tide of questions needing to be summarized (which takes TIME), when we can't even get a hold of the close vote queue (which is honestly TOPS three clicks for a post...) – Patrice Jun 2 '16 at 22:28
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    It wasn't you, it was the boss. He won't like your proposal. – Hans Passant Jun 2 '16 at 22:28
  • @Patrice By voting questions ON topic rather than OFF topic, since more questions are off-topic than on, you'll have enough time to summarize the questions, which shouldn't take much time for an expert anyway. – user5536767 Jun 2 '16 at 22:29
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    The moderation overhead this would require wouldn't scale in any sense. – fbueckert Jun 2 '16 at 22:31
  • @fbueckert I'd apply my last comment in response to this one also. – user5536767 Jun 2 '16 at 22:32
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    @Viziionary shouldn't take much time?! For a GOOD question that'll explain the fundamentals of it..... yes, it does. Polishing a question is HONESTLY hard. I can give good answers when I put myself too it, not sure I can write a pearl of a question though. A lot of users are the same. I get the sentiment, but honestly, this is just WAAAAAAAAY too much. How do you deal with questions in a tag where there is no "experts"? How do you get "experts" for new tags? you look at overall rep? There is a lot of small issues with this, if you still forget the big one of scalability. – Patrice Jun 2 '16 at 22:32
  • Wrong. So very, very wrong. – fbueckert Jun 2 '16 at 22:33
  • And anyway, this site was created because experts were tired of answering the same code dumps again and again... now, your solution is "let anyone post their crap, and get these experts to a) answer the question AND b) make it accessible to everyone". Why not just become "jon Skeet and friends' blog" if we are to get the experts to write everything of import here? – Patrice Jun 2 '16 at 22:34
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    ROTFLOL!!!!!!!!!!! NO!!! – Martin James Jun 2 '16 at 22:41
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    @Viziionary The reality is that for every "expert" on SO, there's probably at least 1000 help vampires needing attention. Personally, I'm not interested in tutoring them. I used to have the patience to do maybe one or two a day. But not anymore. So this isn't gonna be scalable. – Mysticial Jun 2 '16 at 23:29
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    This reads more like a feature request than a discussion. – Travis J Jun 2 '16 at 23:44
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    @JoshCaswell - That is why comments aren't good places to start feature requests. If only you could downvote them. – Travis J Jun 3 '16 at 7:51
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    @Josh Servy's idea was to have the post closed and reopened through votes. This idea is "reopen through votes. Oh and at the same time write the question". Major difference in implementation :/ – Patrice Jun 3 '16 at 11:31
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  • Question will be closed automatically with zero community effort if enough (high rep) users view it without voting it as "acceptable" and a certain time limit passes.

Some people have lives. It shouldn't be the responsiblity of high rep users to camp the new question queue just to approve questions. Also with this system in place, it will make moderation a nightmare.

  • A valid question is voted on-topic. (meanwhile, 5 other questions were passively assumed off-topic and removed).

What if a crap question is voted on-topic? What if those 5 questions got deleted because of low visibility? And silently deleting them defeats the entire point of the closing process in the first place. Questions are put on hold so people can fix their questions with community feedback.

  • An expert summarizes this question, and either votes this fundamental summary as duplicate or original. Once a few votes mark it as duplicate or original, it's either closed as a duplicate or "opened" as original, and answering begins.

This site is not a communal hivemind. Not all questions are exact duplicates. Searching for duplicates is not an easy task.

Your suggestion clashes with how the system fundamentally works. There's no way it could be reasonably implemented.

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