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I used to see questions that are closed as "not constructive" in the past. But I don't see that reason in the close vote dialog. So I guess non-constructive questions are welcomed now?

Of course, you can use a custom close reason by adding a comment saying that's not constructive but that's very rare. Also, the "closed as not constructive" message seems like the question is closed with a "proper" close reason that you can choose from. Usually, you know, the custom close reasons' font sizes are small and stuff.

So if I am just really curious about a library/language and I asked a question about something that no one else except me would want to know (which is not constructive), will it get closed, or highly upvoted, or something else?

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The "Not Constructive" close reason was changed (along with many other close reasons at the same time).

That doesn't mean that unconstructive questions are allowed, just that the title of the close reason and its explanation was less clear to users of the site as to when to use it and what it meant, and it was used a bit too broadly, so new close reasons that are clearer and more specific were created.

  • What I think "not constructive" means is that no one would want to know the answer to your question because it's not really that interesting. Apparently I'm wrong. So will questions that no one wants to know the answer to be closed? – Sweeper May 12 '16 at 13:27
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    @Sweeper There is no close reason for "not interesting", nor has there ever been one. You could downvote a question if you don't think it would be useful. – Servy May 12 '16 at 13:29
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    So I should not ask these kind of questions then? – Sweeper May 12 '16 at 13:30
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    @Sweeper What kind of questions? – Servy May 12 '16 at 13:48
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    @Sweeper if you mean the type of question you alluded too in your question here, then I think you need to make your hypothetical question more specific for us to really tell you for certain if it is going to be acceptable or not. – psubsee2003 May 12 '16 at 14:02

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