4

I recently flagged two answers for spam, due to the fact that both answers promote a product by a company by the name of Axiomatics; The OP in question of both answers was not disclosing the fact that they are

  1. An employee of Axiomatics, but also that
  2. They are the "VP Customer Relations" of Axiomatics.

To his credit, he has in the past mentioned in a few answers that he works for Axiomatics, but in the 10 or so questions I picked from his answer history in the tag show him promoting Axiomatics without disclosing this affliation.

Am I being overzealous here or misunderstanding what the spam flag is for?

spam flag description

  • 3
    The answers you link to may link to their company, but they don't seem to be promoting it like I'd expect spam to. "More information at ..." And pointing to a website that does indeed contain more information about the subject their post discusses (without much in the way of buy buy buy) just doesn't look like spam. It looks like someone trying to provide helpful answers (which judging by score, many of them are) with suitable references. – TZHX May 11 '16 at 19:37
  • 2
    In the SOCVR room, where a lot of spam flaggers can be found, we tend to be very reluctant once a user has considerable rep. For those posts from high-reps a comment pointing to How not to be a spammer is often the first call to action. Feel free to drop in the room and ask for a second opinion. – rene May 11 '16 at 19:43
16

You missed one word in the spam flag description:

Exists only to promote a product or service, does not disclose the author's affiliation.

The answer itself can be useful. If it contains a link that promotes a product or service, without disclosing the author's affiliation, you can edit it out. There's no need to nuke good answers.

  • 2
    It's unclear what that wants to say. Does it mean if the post Exists only to promote a product or service but it does disclose the affiliation then it's fine? In that case I suggest changing the comma to an and. If it's not an and then it's an or which means OP interpreted it correctly, because while the post doesn't only exist to promote, it does not disclose affiliation. – Jester May 12 '16 at 1:26
  • @Jester When this was posted as a comment to the answer I did actually mention exactly that; I interpreted that statement as a logical or, not a logical and. The reason I flagged them as spam was because the dialog indicated that not disclosing personal affiliation could be considered spam. I don't actually consider the posts to be spam - they are brilliant answers - but they do not disclose OP's affiliation, which I was under the impression they should given the wording of that flag. – Dan Pantry May 12 '16 at 5:07
  • 1
    This is also backed up in this help center article. "Post good, relevant answers, and if some (but not all) happen to be about your product or website, that’s okay. However, you must disclose your affiliation in your answers." – Dan Pantry May 12 '16 at 5:13
10

These aren't spam because they contain helpful information, (especially the second answer that you link) and don't advertise a certain product/company.

This first answer you reference does contain unnecessary information. He points to a blog, not a specific blog post. It is highly likely over time that the blog post he means to refer to will get buried, and this should be a correction the OP makes.

The second answer is just listing a few additional resources for reference, they just happen to be more personally attributed to the OP (which isn't bad).

-5

First of all, please let me remind everyone that the presence of helpful information does not mean that it isn't spam. Like the time when the punctuation was a spam link!!! Spammers are getting crafty by plagiarizing real answers, so you can't rely on the content completely.

Of course, the posts you flagged don't fall into that category. You probably should have used a custom flag if you really feel that it couldn't be handled by talking to the user. This will give the mod more context, and also allow them to decide what should be done about it.

The spam flag comes with a rep penalty and a black mark, so they are not given out lightly.

According to Brad Larson, moderator, in his comment here:

Spam flags can carry severe penalties, and I didn't want to impose that on someone who had otherwise been a productive member of the site. I do handle longstanding accounts who happen to slip up and forget attribution differently from brand-new accounts whose first post is to advertise a commercial offering. Perhaps I should have disputed, rather than declined the flag, since I understand the intent of the flag. I just didn't want to penalize a helpful member of company who provided a targeted answer...

It seems like the user is a contributing member and just slipped up. They don't deserve to be penalized for something that could be solved with a friendly reminder and an edit.

If you click on the link in the flag reason, it's clear that it's permissible to answer questions from your experience working for a company (as long as it's in moderation):

Don't talk about your product / website / book / job too much. Folks will read your answers for their ability to solve a specific problem; if you're good at doing that, then they'll find themselves more interested in who you are and what you're working on. If you respond only to questions where the answer can be something you're selling, they'll assume you're just here to sell.

  • 1
    Two things: One, there was no reason to flag either of these answers since neither of them are spam, and two, I'm really not sure what it is but the tone of this answer feels...off to me. Personal opinion, so don't read too much into it. – Makoto May 12 '16 at 0:16
  • @Makoto Yes, I think that my answer was lacking in flow. I've edited it so that it's more unified. – Laurel May 12 '16 at 0:27

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