38

Earlier, I was the first one to reach the limit on the Low Quality Posts review queue. I was, of course, the "top reviewer" of the day. Once someone else reached the limit, he rose to the top. I thought that possibly it was in reverse order, but the next person came between the two of us. The third came after the second, but still just above me. Therefore, I thought that maybe everybody comes before the first, and they come in the order they reach the limit. That doesn't seem to be it either, however, because the fourth came straight to second place. I thought it was possibly in order of reputation, but the person in second place has less reputation than I. How is it decided? The ranking is as follows:

2 (first place)
5 (second place)
3 (third place)
4 (fourth place)
1 (fifth place)
  • 7
    Because, data is sorted by userid ,but not reputation(order by userid asc → small to large userid's). – Raju May 8 '16 at 2:47
  • as per this comment by rene, it's not exactly order by, but userid chosen by sql server as it is a primarykey. – Raju May 8 '16 at 20:23
  • 5
    Really the notion of calling that list "Top Reviewer" for the day is a little silly, considering we're capped at such a low number per day. It should be titled something like "Reviewers who've maxed out their daily reviews", only sexier. – TylerH May 9 '16 at 15:29
  • 2
    For anyone as confused as I was, you can see this list by clicking the "recent reviews »" link below each queue on stackoverflow.com/review. (This takes you to locations like stackoverflow.com/review/close/stats.) – jpmc26 May 9 '16 at 20:43
6

As of today, January 10th 2019, there is an explicit, secondary order for the "Today" list: reviewers with the same number of reviews will be ordered according to the time at which each person last reviewed - so each new person to hit the limit will rise to the top of the list in turn, giving everyone a chance of recognition.

Kudos to Nick Craver for this idea, which he implemented today while assisting Taryn with some much-needed performance improvements to the review stats pages.

  • 2
    Said another way, the top person is the most recent to have maxed out. – jhpratt Jan 11 at 3:46
44

The data is sorted based on the users' registered user IDs on Stack Overflow.

For example:

Low quality posts review

user IDs of above list:

╔══════════════════════════╗
║ Userid  ║ Name           ║   
╠══════════════════════════╣
║ 189134  ║ andy           ║
║ 369450  ║ cpburnz        ║
║ 2227834 ║ unheilig       ║
║ 3461955 ║ kittmedia      ║
║ 3559349 ║ stephen-muecke ║
║ 5827958 ║ zondo          ║
╚══════════════════════════╝ 
  • 55
    IIRC as told by Adam Lear there is no order by on that query so it really serves rows in any order sql server chooses to. It seems to use the primary key index now but if a different execution plan is selected you might end up with different results. – rene May 8 '16 at 14:52
7

You've missed the point. This list is unnumbered, so the order of users with the same number of reviews is irrelevant. Everyone with the same number of reviews ranks equally.

rene mentions in a comment:

IIRC as told by Adam Lear there is no order by on that query so it really serves rows in any order sql server chooses to. It seems to use the primary key index now but if a different execution plan is selected you might end up with different results.

This is consistent with the first paragraph, since it means that results are returned in arbitrary order. This doesn't eliminate the JavaScript from performing some ordering, of course. I leave that for someone else to investigate, but regardless, conceptually, there is no ranking within a group of people who have the same number of reviews.

  • Why should JS do any ordering? – Oriol May 10 '16 at 23:17
  • 1
    I'm referring to the possibility that someone coded it that way. I have no idea what might motivate it; I just don't want to ignore the possibility. If there is truly no ORDER BY in the query, then something else must be doing the ordering by review count. It's not clear to me whether @rene means that there is no ORDER BY (truly arbitrary order for all rows) or no ORDER BY beyond the review count (arbitrary order within the same review count), though. – jpmc26 May 10 '16 at 23:23

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