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This case is about this specific unregistered user. He has been posting numerous abusive trash posts, as well as one or two not entirely garbage ones for the past 5 days now. As far as I can recall, he has posted at least 15(!) posts that got nuked via abusive flags, and still is yet able to post more. Shouldn't getting one or two posts abusive-nuked trigger an answer ban, let alone 15?

How come this guy can still post?

Record of the posts he made that were nuked:

https://metasmoke.erwaysoftware.com/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&title=&body=&username=wingding&why=&site=&feedback=&reason=&user_rep_direction=%3E%3D&user_reputation=0&commit=Search

Edit: Turns out the one non-garbage post he has is plagiarized from the answer above it in entirety (although by copying he messed up the code markup). Yikes.

  • 15
    This is not a single account, he's using different accounts of same username. He has also posted a spam on my question, after flagging that account was removed. SOCVR message – Tushar May 2 '16 at 6:55
  • 8
    If you look at the Smokeys reports(ones which are not removed because of timeout) in SOCVR, you can see that the username is same but userID is different. – Tushar May 2 '16 at 7:06
  • 54
    When I read the 15(!) part, I thought it was 15 factorial... – Sweeper May 2 '16 at 11:13
  • 3
    What do the marks mean in said results? Close votes? Answers? Its the first time I see this metasmoke tool – Just Do It May 2 '16 at 16:29
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    @JustDoIt The green checkmarks mean a smokedetector privileged user has marked them as true positives (real spam / abusive), red crosses indicate false positives (normal posts) and the little pile of poo is false positive but still deletable (NAA posts). Marking a post as true positive also blacklists the poster of that post network wide, means if they post again smoke detector will report these posts no matter what. – mag May 2 '16 at 16:52
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    @JustDoIt Metasmoke is a tool that collects data on all Smokedetector reports (smoke detector is a bot that scans all new posts network wide for potential spam/abusive posts based on heuristics and a user and website and keyword blacklist). People who hang out in the SOCVR chatroom or the Charcoal HQ or the Tavern on the Meta can request to become privileged users able to give feedback. Approval is pending acceptance by the Smokedetector admins (Meta, ArtOfCode and Undo atm) – mag May 2 '16 at 16:53
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    @JustDoIt if you want a more in-depth explaination you can ping me in the SOCVR chatroom and I can explain it to you in more detail – mag May 2 '16 at 16:57
  • 8
    Wow, that's one bored high school kid. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot May 2 '16 at 16:57
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    @ThisSuitIsBlackNot this kind of guy – gnat May 2 '16 at 20:06
  • 3
    @Sweeper Now that would be an impressive troll. Also, I'd guess 1.3 trillion posts in 5 days would probably break something. – reirab May 2 '16 at 20:57
  • 2
    @JoeBlow Blatant trolling (posting links to screamers/porn) and blatant abusive posts. You can see the original content of them all here by clicking on each post individually. WARNING OBVIOUSLY NSFW DO NOT DO AT WORK. – mag May 3 '16 at 13:53
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    i see, what is a "screamer" btw ?! I clicked through a few of the linked examples, but the ones I clicked on were more like "idiotic holding down of repeat key on keyboard", I did not see any actual links to sites or the like. No big deal at all, I was just curious. You wonder if like the guy was "annoyed at" SO (why?!) or what the purpose is. Is it literally just like graffiti? Totally pointless "beavis & butthead" "heh-heh-heh"-ism? Is it a "disgruntled newb" who asked a stupid question and got annoyed at the annoyed response? who knows! it's a fascinating social phenomenon!! – Fattie May 3 '16 at 13:57
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    @gnat It's people like that that make me glad some countries have started handing out court-ordered internet bans for abusive/trolling behavior. – TylerH May 3 '16 at 13:58
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    @JoeBlow A screamer is a page with very loud noises and/or jump scares. The idea is you click on a link thinking it'll be helpful or interesting, and instead your headphones are blown up. It's a childish but common annoyance on the Internet. – Conspicuous Compiler May 3 '16 at 16:56
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    @gnat Is that UX ad pure coincidence? – Tobias Kienzler May 4 '16 at 6:28
60

They're using multiple accounts, and a large 'snowshoe' proxy network to distribute them evenly across many different hosts. The spam system does quickly hone in on networks when users spam-flag something into oblivion (it's one of the strongest signals we have) - they're just coming from all over the place. Might be more than one person.

We could put this limit in place as part of the quality checks. Slow you down, severely if you've had a post spam-flag deleted, but there's two problems with the approach:

  • It's even more incentive to just continue making new accounts. This would only work for people that had some investment in maintaining a single account for serious use of the site.

  • It could conceivably be abused, if coordinated through chat. If this was going to be effective at slowing down, say, a compromised account that someone was using to troll with - this would have to kick in at all rep levels. That means 5 people could keep very active users from posting for a day or two - kind of attractive if you want to hold them back so you can write answers that get more votes, or just want to play a prank, or perhaps escalate an argument.

Yeah, I realize that the second reason is a little remote and definitely a clear sign of abuse that should be dealt with - but it'd be a major headache if that happened, enough so that it deters me from making it a possibility.

With that said, we do have plans to explore potential integration with our spam / abuse mitigation system and the community run Smoke Detector project so the system can take more blocking signals from it, which would vastly improve our defenses against this kind of stuff. I plan to make that a priority as soon as we're closer to getting all of the other new stuff shipped and battened down.

  • 5
    Note, there are quality heuristics that prevent answering for a period of time for new users - this is determined by voting history at the account level, and aggregate voting at the IP/subnet level, just in case this stuff doesn't get enough spam flags fast enough, being downvoted into oblivion can help bring about the same effect. – Tim Post May 2 '16 at 7:33
  • 2
    How about the quality checks to forbid URLs from rep one users in an Answer. Users who registered today. That sort of thing – Drew May 2 '16 at 7:35
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    Tim, might it be worth considering to automatically block people who register a new account under the exact same name as a deleted one shortly after one was deleted? – mag May 2 '16 at 7:36
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    Also, if there is a website url blacklist in SO, the one website this guy has been spamming certainly ought to be on it. – mag May 2 '16 at 7:36
  • 1
    @Magisch - One form of that has been implemented: meta.stackexchange.com/a/278803/135615 , where spammers / trolls who reuse the same credentials are automatically locked out. It's trickier for names, because there are a lot of people on this site and many reused names. The false positive rate on that might be too high. Regarding blacklists, they aren't edited often, and sites are only added to them if they are long-time, persistent spam targets (50+ post range over months). – Brad Larson May 2 '16 at 14:12
  • 1
    @Magisch True, however that assumes the chat occurs in SE, and not in, say, IRC. – BryanH May 2 '16 at 17:01
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    @Magisch It would. But the time and effort we'd need to put into handling that happening even once is sufficient for me to be pretty reluctant to implement it, especially given that most trolls are delighted to just make new accounts. I think it would only affect real users, and it'd be a mess every time that happened. – Tim Post May 2 '16 at 18:05
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    As for names, we've tried blacklisting recently used troll / spammer names - works for around 3 seconds until they figure it out and @lternate $trings. It then becomes a very depressing game of whack-a-mole. – Tim Post May 2 '16 at 18:07
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    Don't you mean "Slap-a-small-burrowing-mammal"? – Cerbrus May 2 '16 at 18:10
  • 1
    Maybe I'm misunderstanding you Tim, but why would this need to apply to medium-high rep users? Surely the cases of high-rep accounts being compromised for trolling is a lot less frequent than low-rep accounts being trolls. – mbrig May 2 '16 at 20:48
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    @BenVoigt: Jon Skeet, the spammer of tomorrow;) – Andras Deak May 3 '16 at 11:49
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    I'm extremely interested in that last paragraph - do you have any details on what that might look like yet, or an ETA on getting all the other stuff shipped? – Undo May 3 '16 at 19:46
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    @TimPost - Has there ever been a discussion about the potential of "shadowbanning" user accounts? i.e. allowing them to post questions and answers which will look normal to their account but actually aren't shown to anyone else? Maybe there would also be a way to link their IP / whatever heuristic to that user so they would also see the posts when not logged in. If these spammers / trolls / bots didn't realise they were being silenced, maybe as least some of them would move on? "Pissing into the wind", so to speak. – misterManSam May 3 '16 at 23:43
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    @misterManSam That would be disastrous if you ever had a false positive. Look at all the controversy its causing on reddit. – mag May 4 '16 at 6:14
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    @misterManSam Yes, but you have to be very careful with applying that to IP adresses. IP adresses are shared and sometimes reused, and sometimes dynamic. The consequences of having a random new (legit) user hit by that are so disastrous and it would be a mess to detect and a mess to fix and would make for a devastating new user experience. – mag May 4 '16 at 6:28

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