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Every now and then I'm writing an answer to a question and before I can finish the question is deleted. It's really frustrating because there's nothing I can do: I can't post the answer, write a comment, or otherwise contact the user. I have no way of knowing that the question was deleted for good reasons and that my answer wouldn't have helped at all. We can't stop users from wanting to delete questions but maybe we can let them know that someone is busy trying to help them?

In a related incident, I was writing an answer, the question was wrongly closed as a duplicate by a very high-rep user, and so I helped in the comments. Eventually the question was reopened and my answer was accepted. This kind of incident is the reason I think it's quite reasonable to suspect that a question may have been deleted too eagerly, and if it is I can't do what I did in that case.

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    If they delete their question, presumably it really should be deleted. Anyway, how would you want to assure those prospective answers would actually materialize in a timely manner when issuing that warning? – Deduplicator Apr 30 '16 at 23:35
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    You can comment if you want (when the post is still alive). But I don't want people knowing when I'm typing. – Laurel May 1 '16 at 0:09
  • @Deduplicator I can't assure that, but it's not likely the answerer is going to silently throw away their work or stop midway for a long time. There are various ways the asker could know that no one is typing any more: at the very least they could try deleting the question again and find that there's no warning. Also I do strongly believe that questions get deleted prematurely. – Alex Hall May 1 '16 at 0:24
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    @Laurel no one has to know that you're typing, just someone. – Alex Hall May 1 '16 at 0:26
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    You know that "closing as dupe" ≠ "deleting" right? – Laurel May 1 '16 at 0:33
  • @Laurel yes. When a question is deleted, I can't do anything. When a question was closed, I was able to do something. I'm not sure you read the question properly. – Alex Hall May 1 '16 at 0:35
  • Why are you mentioning it then? Your question is about deleted questions – Laurel May 1 '16 at 0:48
  • @Laurel I said that in the question too. People are quick to decide that a question is not worth keeping alive and open when really there is help to be given. – Alex Hall May 1 '16 at 0:51
  • Are you saying it would be better if the question author was prevented from deleting their question until after you submit your answer? (I think I missed something here.) – HansUp May 1 '16 at 0:56
  • @HansUp no, just something like "Are you sure you want to delete your question? Someone is currently typing an answer for you! [Yes] [No]". Presumably a dialog with the first part already exists and just needs to be altered to check for the existence of answer drafts. – Alex Hall May 1 '16 at 1:00
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    I think that most of the questions that get self deleted quickly are rather poor, and I don't want them to stay around any longer than they need to. Do you have any examples of good questions? – Laurel May 1 '16 at 1:05
  • OK, thanks, I understand better. But now I'm wondering how useful that would be. You would have an opportunity to complete and submit your answer, but I suspect the likely outcome is the OP would still delete their question. Unless you think the main reason folks delete their questions is because they don't think they will get an answer. I'm skeptical about that. – HansUp May 1 '16 at 1:05
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    You could ask a 10k+ user to see if they can find it. But just because you have an answer does not mean that the question should be answered. – Laurel May 1 '16 at 1:09
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    This doesn't sound like a terrible idea to me. The one thing that's more annoying that crap questions wasting people's time is crap questions wasting people's time and going out of their way to make absolutely sure that nobody can ever again possibly benefit from any effort that's already been invested. In general it sounds like a special case of "hey, I got my answer now, k thx bi" syndrome. Anything that encourages askers to take a bit more time before posting and put in a bit more effort curating things after posting has to be a good thing right? – Flexo May 1 '16 at 12:14
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    @Flexo: "In general it sounds like a special case of "hey, I got my answer now, k thx bi" syndrome." It would only be that if someone else answered the question before you got done with your answer. Given that case, the principle harm is that the person is deleting an answered question, not that he's deleting a question that is about to have a second answer. – Nicol Bolas May 1 '16 at 15:19
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I do not believe such a warning would be useful. The reason comes down to investigating why a person is deleting their own question to begin with. There are many possibilities:

  • The question is poor and the asker realizes this. Maybe it was a simple typo and they figured it out right after they posted it.

    Well, quite frankly, I have to wonder why you were trying to answer a poor question in the first place, but never mind that now. If this is the case, it doesn't matter if you're writing an answer or not. The question was poor and removing it is good for the site. It also doesn't hurt the asker, since they realized that it was a poor question.

  • The question is poor and the asker discovered this through a flurry of downvotes/comments. Your answer might help the asker, but it hurts the site overall. Why? Because giving someone who asks a poor question what he wants only encourages him to ask more of them.

    That's bad. Better for all of us that your encouragement of such behavior is lost.

  • The question is not poor, but the asker faced a flurry of downvotes/comments/close votes that caused them to delete it. The aforementioned flurry of activity is presumably mistaken/misinformed/ignorant. Note that this scenario assumes that this is not the fault of the question; that is, the asker did due diligence in explaining themselves, and people just made some mistakes in reading it. Otherwise the question itself is poor.

    Given this case, the most effective solution is not to write an answer. The most effective solution is to comment and explain the apparent misunderstanding or issue. Clearing up the misunderstanding could get others to retract their votes/comments or help others vote/comment against it. It would also help the asker see that someone understood the question properly, and thus prompt them not to delete the question.

    Attack the problem at its source.

  • The question is a needless duplicate, and the asker found the question it is a duplicate of. You adding an answer to such a question is not helpful to either the asker (who has the proper answer) or to the site. So nothing much is lost by losing your answer.

  • The question is off-topic. Say, it's something that belongs on Programmers.SE, CodeReview, or whatever. If the asker realizes this, they can delete it. Losing your answer doesn't hurt the site or the asker. They'll likely get a better answer at the site appropriate to their question.

  • The asker is a jerk who deletes their question the moment an answer is posted. Losing your soon-to-be answer doesn't hurt the asker. Such jerks want evidence of their post removed ASAP; they don't care if someone might have posted another answer in a minute or two.

    This kind of behavior does hurt the site, of course. But the primary damage is not losing your soon-to-be answer. It's losing the answer that was actually posted (which prompted the jerk to delete the question, since they have what they want). If your suggested solution is just a warning, the asker will just ignore it since they have what they want. And if your suggestion is out-right forbidding such deletion, it wouldn't stop someone from deleting the post if one person answered and nobody else happens to be typing an answer at that point. So it doesn't really solve the actual problem.

Overall, I don't see the cases where your solution would be helpful.

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