37

If you go here, you'll see this:

Why is the name blank? Shouldn't there be a placeholder?


Edit: I inspected the page source. A normal deleted user looks like this:

<div class="user-details">
    kjhg
    <div class="-flair">

    </div>
</div>

The user in question looks like this (it shows up as nothing obviously):

<div class="user-details">

    <div class="-flair">

    </div>
</div>
1
  • 3
    Something about the userXXXXXXX being implemented later I think. Notice the ancient date of the post.
    – ryanyuyu
    Apr 25, 2016 at 15:16

1 Answer 1

41

animuson explained in a comment:

This was a very old disassociation request, back when the user ID and display name just got deleted from the post and not replaced with anything (it gets set to "anon" now). The display name has never allowed white-space or weird invisible characters like that. There's about 2,300 such posts.

Until May 2011, display names of deleted users were kept. (Since then, they are reverted to userNNNNN format). Back then, some replaced their display name with something anonymous prior to deletion. Apparently, this user managed to make a name out of whitespace or zero-width characters. I don't know if it's possible today; the restrictions on usernames also evolved with time. November 2008 is very early in SO history.

5
  • 12
    Strangely enough the ownerdisplayname seems to be empty/null: data.stackexchange.com/stackoverflow/query/477867
    – rene
    Apr 25, 2016 at 16:02
  • 5
    This was a very old disassociation request, back when the user ID and display name just got deleted from the post and not replaced with anything (it gets set to "anon" now). The display name has never allowed white-space or weird invisible characters like that. There's about 2,300 such posts.
    – animuson StaffMod
    Apr 26, 2016 at 14:24
  • 4
    I wonder whether the chicken (this post) or the egg (the comment) came first!
    – Alex Jolig
    Apr 27, 2016 at 3:46
  • 1
    It's always the chicken in my book. :-) Apr 27, 2016 at 17:30
  • 9
    @GeorgeBailey Always the egg in my book. The egg and the chicken that hatches from it are genetically identical. However, a chicken is genetically distinct from any fertilized egg that it lays. So a chicken egg is required to produce a chicken, but a non-chicken can produce a chicken egg. Therefore, the existence of the chicken requires the pre-existence of the egg, but not vice-versa, and the egg must logically come first. ;-) Apr 28, 2016 at 0:41

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