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My intentions have been leaning more towards "gaining reputation points" than "help people" recently. I still have intentions to help, but my urge to gain more reputation points has been outweighing my urge to help. These actions include:

  1. Answering duplicates before they are marked duplicate, giving answers that are specific to the question being asked, albeit the "broader" answer in another post explains the situation pretty well.
  2. Answering questions that lack detail, then editing my answer as details are gained (rather than asking the asker to include more details, confirming the problem, before answering)
  3. Advertising my previous answers by slightly manipulating the subject at hand to make my advertised answer seem relevant, while understanding that the advertised answer may not be of any use to the OP (in hopes that bored wanderers will find it interesting)
  4. Boosting older posts by editing them, allowing them to appear on the first page of "active" in hopes of gaining more attention/reputation. Although the edits are justified (includes more, relevant details), the intention for editing is "game" related.
  5. Asking questions I already know the answer to, but have yet to seen them anywhere on the site solely to gain reputation, knowing that there is a "community wiki" option.

The list goes on, but you get the idea: I (try to) stay within the rules, but not focusing on the primary purpose of the site, which is to create a Q&A dictionary (in a sense) for programmers to reference. Instead, I focus on gaining badges/reputation to gain privileges. Although I still help developers, I'm not helping the site itself by working towards keeping it clean.


A few reasons why I think I may have gamified Stack Overflow:

  1. Reputation seems a lot harder to come by without taking "the extra step", due to many questions in the language I favor already being answered, thus making privileges harder to unlock
  2. I see others doing it (conformity)
  3. I currently lack privileges I desire
  4. Gamification seems to be my best form of motivation towards bring myself to contribute (rather than taking the "Well someone else will most likely/is bound to do it" route), since a reachable goal with an end in sight is created as soon as I start gamifying, as opposed to the somewhat overwhelming, opinion-based and never ending goal of "A well documented Q&A site"
  5. No one has actually asked me to stop
  6. I feel the competitive nature when gaming leads me to writing higher quality posts

I want to stop, but I know it would strongly impact my usage of the site, to the point where I find myself constantly flagging posts (mostly for duplicates) rather than helping a developer get from point A to point B. I came here to help developers with their programming problems, not teach people how to write well-received posts. I know there are others out there who gamify Stack Overflow as well (50k+ reputation points, answering questions they know should be flagged/improved, for the sake of gaining rep), so this is not a rare problem.


Some of the "solutions" I've come up with, each with a description of why it may not have effect:

Find a new language to work with if you feel all the good questions in your favored language have been spent.

Not everyone is a hobbyist. You may assume "if they have time to gain reputation points on Stack Overflow, they have time to delve into a new language", but that doesn't always apply. Stack Overflow has been implementing systems to allow developers to advertise their accounts to employers - Stack Overflow has been attempting to become a source of credential. Reputation could be a goal to gain moderation privileges, such as re-opening a good question (after it has been updated) that you are interested in.

If (some peoples') competitive nature of gamification leads to a trashy site, all the progress you have now could be loss

How could we know for sure how many people actually gamify Stack Overflow? For all we know, the ones gamifying the site could be the ones keeping it alive. I find gamification to have quite an impact on how "laid-back" my posts are. I'm more determined to push out wiki-like posts if I feel there is competition, and that I must give a well formatted answer. There are many answers that get chosen due to publicity from outside viewers, albeit the answer that helped the OP was written in a form easier for the OP to read, rather than being seen as reference material.

Those are the only two things I can think of that'll lead to me no longer gamifying.


I should be helping programmers with code, but instead I'm moderating with tool restrictions.

I don't mind moderating, as it does help programmers understand concepts like the XY problem, how to express your problems better, how to avoid writing unclear posts, etc... It also contributes towards creating a hearty Q&A site for programmers.

But 90% of my time on Stack Overflow would be moderation if I didn't perform the actions listed at the top of this post. Rather than helping people with programming problems, I feel more like I'm working as an overqualified janitor that's not getting paid.

The worst part is, I'm not given all the tools involved with the job. To gain those tools, I must perform non-moderation tasks such as asking/answering questions. So not only do I feel more like a janitor than a programmer, I feel like a petty janitor that lacks tools. If I'm gonna be a janitor, I'm going to work towards being a handy janitor, in the sense that I have all the tools needed to be the best janitor I can be. This contributes to the intentions to "game" to gain reputation points.

Yet I choose to stay.

Stack Overflow is the best of its kind, hands down. It seems to be the most maintained programming Q&A site with the highest quality content. That's why I feel bad for treating it like a game in ways that may reduce the quality.

If I have a question about programming, I'm going to want to ask it here. I also want to be respected when I do so.

For example, this question. As soon as it was asked, it received some pretty bad feedback. It had -2 and 4 close votes at the time. Eventually, it started gaining some better feedback, but you can still see the damage in the comments, up until a user mentioned:

I think that if this question was asked by a higher rep user, it would have no close votes or downvotes and many more upvotes.

Which was proven by a question asked by the same guy who made the quoted statement. The user with low reputation was shunned for using reflection and questioning his program's strange results. The user with high reputation did the same exact thing, except he didn't receive any negative feedback. It's pretty apparent why I'd want higher reputation when it comes to getting a problem of mine solved.

So why would anyone stop?

Well it does have potential of littering the site. But we are willing to use vehicles and tools that pollute our air. We are willing to build cities that destroy the homes and migration paths of wildlife. There are TONS of selfish actions we humans do primarily for our own selfish benefit, so unless I somehow force myself to become the Stack Overflow version of a "tree hugger", what would be the reason to stop? In my eyes, I'm simply one of many others on this site, so my mind travels towards the same questions people ask in the real world: "How much damage could I really be doing? If I stopped, would it make any difference, seeing how everyone else is still doing it?" and other similar questions.


There's a post asking for suggestions on anti-gamification techniques that should be implemented, but that doesn't help me right now.

I haven't always gamified Stack Overflow, and even in recent times I haven't done much of it, but I can feel the tendency rising. I'm guessing it's due to the 5k reputation gap between privileges that I have encountered, since I haven't had this feeling up until that point.

What should someone who gamifies Stack Overflow do in the very near future (don't have to wait for an update) to stop gamifying while still staying active in the programming aspect of the community (not the moderation side)?

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    While I am not sure what the answer to this is, your question is very well written and introspective. – Travis J Apr 19 '16 at 21:50
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    Also, I am curious, is this an actual problem that needs solving? I am not sure if it is or not. – Travis J Apr 19 '16 at 21:52
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    @TravisJ: Yes. Yes, it is a problem. It's good that the OP is at least identifying it. What the problem is - in actuality - is that the OP cares more about their reputation than substantial answers. – Makoto Apr 19 '16 at 21:58
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    This could be the first support meeting for Reputation Anonymous: "Hi everyone, my name is... and I'm a rep-aholic"... :p – Jon Clements Apr 19 '16 at 22:06
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    Hi @Jon! Would you like to share today? ;) – Travis J Apr 19 '16 at 22:07
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    You're not 'gamifying' Stack Overflow. Gamify means take something that people don't want to do and add elements of a game to it, like codeacademy, so that people enjoy doing it. You're taking advantage of/exploiting how SO is programmed to get as many reputation points as possible, at the expense of its purpose. – Andrew Koper Apr 19 '16 at 23:42
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    Make it a game to not gamify SO – rosenthal Apr 19 '16 at 23:49
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    I'll fix your reputation problems for the short term. Goes on a downvoting spree... – Nathan Osman Apr 20 '16 at 0:00
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    I think it's sad that people are attacking you for being honest. I'm fairly new here, and I agree that the site's reputation system makes it hard to start out as a new user focused on a well-known language. I like what you've said here. – vestlen Apr 20 '16 at 0:41
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    You use too much bold text, you ought to stop that. The rest is just fine, merely a victim of social engineers like Clay Shirky pushing your buttons and what the company wants you to do. You automatically get fed up with it, usually after reaching some kind of internalized mile stone. Like reaching 10K. After which many contributors just give up and never come back again. Maybe you got there a little early :) – Hans Passant Apr 20 '16 at 6:16
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    but I know it would strongly impact my usage of the site, to the point where I find myself constantly flagging posts (mostly for duplicates) rather than helping a developer get from point A to point B. Interesting that you bring that up specifically - most people fall into that pattern not realizing it until they're burned out - yet here you are, fully aware of it. I'm pretty sure this is a non-issue for you because you're ahead of the game. – Gimby Apr 20 '16 at 8:20
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    @Hans Passant: I thought the use of bold was fine, in fact, I'd say it's a very effective use of bold. It's not like the OP went and bolded every other word in every paragraph. #boldlivesmatter – BoltClock Apr 21 '16 at 6:33
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    Am I an enabler if I upvote this? – Goose Apr 21 '16 at 21:27
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It is my understanding that Stack Overflow and the other Stack Exchange sites are built on the idea of gamification. To ask you and other users to stop gamifying it would be self-contradictory.

However, if the rules of the game are producing bad results (like answering duplicates and questions lacking detail) then it sounds like the rules of the game need to be modified and refined.

With regard to your own noble desire to stop gamifying Stack Overflow in a way that produces bad results, a possible solution would be to change your playing strategy. In this this meta answer, CodeGnome compares the fastest-answer strategy and the most-canonical-answer strategy. It sounds like you have been playing the fastest-answer strategy. This is a short-term strategy for quick rep gain.

Most-Canonical-Answer Strategy

Consider playing the most-canonical-answer strategy. With this strategy you write good answers that are superior to the other answers which already exist (or at least fill a void left by the other answers). You won't gain any quick rep points but over time your answers will rise to the top. It is the idea of compound interest or investment. Using this strategy you won't find yourself answering duplicate questions before they have had time to be marked. You also won't be answering before other people have already requested all the relevant info from the OP. Perhaps most importantly, you won't be wasting your time answering questions that no one ever looks at again.

I almost never answer new questions (but I am very thankful for those who do). I use the most-canonical-answer strategy. Since I am still learning myself, I write the answers that I wish had been there for me. Thus, writing a canonical answer forces me to learn the topic more thoroughly. I see that you have written a fair number of questions yourself, so that shows you are still willing to learn, too.

Here are some specific strategies:

  • Answer questions that have a high question-to-answer vote ratio. People tend to upvote answers more than questions. If a question has a good answer, the ratio is usually 1:2 or 1:3. That is, the top voted answer has 2 to 3 times more votes than the question does. If the ratio is 1:1 or if the question has more votes than the top answer, then this probably means that a lot of people come here but don't find the answer they were looking for. (example)
  • Answer questions that have a lot of views. These are usually answers that come up first in a search. A general rule is about 10,000 views (or at least thousands of views a year). A question may be lacking a good canonical answer, but if no one is visiting it don't waste your time. I make exceptions for low traffic tags, though. (example)
  • You are not answering the question for the OP but for the masses. Sometimes this means you are answering the question asked in the title and not the specific details of the OP's problem. This point may be controversial, but I think it provides answers that help more people.(example)
  • Q&A format. When both the question and the canonical answer that you are looking for don't exist, then add your own Q&A pair. If it is something you wished had been there when you were searching, then probably other people in the future will, too. (example)
  • Supplemental answers may be helpful if the current answers lack details. The current answers may answer the question adequately as far as getting to code to work goes, but some people are looking for a more detailed explanation of why it works. (example)
  • A picture is worth a thousand words. This is related to supplemental answers. For some topics, adding a graphic can help people understand a concept much more quickly. (example)

A note about advertising

Your third point was about advertising your previous answers. Using the most-canonical-answer strategy does not prevent this, but at least it makes the answers you link to more valuable. I'm not opposed to people linking to their own answers if those answers are actually helpful. Just the other day MartinR linked to one of his previous answers. I thought that was great because his answers are some of the best around. It wasn't a duplicate, but it was similar enough to be very useful.

As my answers increase, I also link related ones together for easy navigation (example). But I also link to other people's answers. Links help people.

Summary

Stack Overflow is built on gaming theory, but it intends to provide quality answers to developers. Using the most-canonical-answer strategy to play the game is a viable option to merge these two aspects.

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    Stack Overflow is built on people writing questions and then other people writing answers to that question. – Andrew Koper Apr 23 '16 at 15:16
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First, I commend you for noticing this on behalf of yourself, and for looking to improve. That's a huge first step, and not many people can identify that they're doing this and want to improve.

This isn't something that anyone expects to change overnight, really - it'll take some time to get used to the idea that not every post needs to be all about the rep.

The main thing here is that the system does appear to let one slide with this sort of behavior, which is unfortunate; it really shouldn't, but I won't deny that it does that sometimes.

You mention that reputation is harder to come by without taking that "next step". As opposed to motivating you to try to game the system, I would personally look at this as a challenge. I've found that, more often than not, taking that "next step" with certain answers has rewarded me (strangely enough) with more reputation than either the first person that answered, or an answer that's been accepted.

Alternatively, you could feel like the question being posed is the kind of question you'd find in an interview. It may even be one of those. In particular, I found answering that question so entertaining that my whiteboard was half-full of solutions and approaches.


With that out of the way, I want to address something specific:

I want to stop, but I know it would strongly impact my usage of the site, to the point where I find myself constantly flagging posts (mostly for duplicates) rather than helping a developer get from point A to point B. I came here to help developers with their programming problems, not teach people how to write well-received posts.

I agree with you here. If you don't want to flag you shouldn't feel obligated to, but know the power is always there. But you do have to bear in mind that the only way that good questions can separate themselves from the bad ones is if you do vote and flag.

If you don't want to police the site constantly, that's fine. No one's asking you to do that. But if you do see litter, don't be shy about throwing it away.

I'll leave you with (most) of the original post below. There have been some additions and corrections to tone in it.


Answering duplicates before they are marked duplicate, giving answers that are specific to the question being asked, albeit the "broader" answer in another post explains the situation pretty well.

This is a definitely a personal pet peeve of mine. It's not very high on the list, but it's still a bit irritating to see someone answer the question that is clearly a duplicate.

In the case that you answer a question that is better answered by a duplicate elsewhere, you've not really helped out; you've fragmented the [potentially useful] knowledge and have made it harder for a person with a similar problem to find a reliable answer.

If you feel that the duplicate answers the question better, either don't answer or delete your own answer. Better yet, if the duplicate is considered a canonical answer, place your answer there instead, but be certain that it addresses the specific concern. An example of that can be found on any canonical question out there, but my favorite (before it was locked) is Java's own NPE question.

If you don't feel the duplicate answers the question, that's a valid position too - be sure to back it up in your answer and leave comments to the effect.

Answering questions that lack detail, then editing my answer as details are gained (rather than asking the asker to include more details, confirming the problem, before answering)

This is a huge problem for me, since effectively you're willing to adopt to questions which are unclear, ambiguous, or unfocused. Those questions should be closed and/or downvoted as opposed to entertained.

It may help someone else out down the road, but the chance of that happening is incredibly slim if the problem can't be clearly expressed. That said, there's little guarantee (although it can happen) of an answer being clear, concise, and to the point if the OP must continually add details to it.

The only realistic thing you can do here is to abstain from answering, vote to close it as "unclear" if it's unclear, and ask the OP to add more details. You could even go one step further and leave a tab open, keeping an eye on the question until you see more details at which point you could answer.

But avoid answering these kinds of questions, since you may give others impetus to create chameleon questions that someone will answer.

Advertising my previous answers by slightly manipulating the subject at hand to make my advertised answer seem relevant, while understanding that the advertised answer may not be of any use to the OP (in hopes that bored wanderers will find it interesting)

Stop doing this. This is disingenuous and an attempt to subvert the intention of the question. If someone does see this, your answer is liable to be downvoted since it isn't actually useful.

Boosting older posts by editing them, allowing them to appear on the first page of "active" in hopes of gaining more attention/reputation. Although the edits are justified (includes more, relevant details), the intention for editing is "game" related.

Asking questions I already know the answer to, but have yet to seen them anywhere on the site solely to gain reputation, knowing that there is a "community wiki" option.

These actions are fine. I will admit that your motivation for editing the questions doesn't win me over, but the net result is that a substantial edit has happened. For the second one, the system explicitly encourages you to write your own answer to questions if you know it, so long as it's in a Q&A style. That's not gaming the system at all.

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    You don't necessarily advertise your previous answers because they answer the question. They just might be related (like a FYI). And if that answer is a good unique answer, where's the harm? Not that I'd do it, but you can relate to an answer of yours, or not of yours. – Tunaki Apr 19 '16 at 22:17
  • @Tunaki: There's little context into how the answers are being advertised by the OP, but in spirit I do agree with you. One can include answers as an addendum, but by and large when I recall someone making mention of them advertising their answer, it's usually done in a way that would make the question seem like a dupe to the other. – Makoto Apr 19 '16 at 22:18
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    This answer is essentially status quo. Nothing will change from simply restating it. Do you have any other suggestions? – Travis J Apr 19 '16 at 22:43
  • @TravisJ: Given that the OP probably wasn't entirely aware of the status quo - that is, they were doing this but they didn't realize that it broke some unspoken guideline - I'm not sure of that claim. But I'll add some examples a bit later. – Makoto Apr 19 '16 at 22:46
  • it's called self-citation and it happens all the time in academia because academic rep is a function of how frequently one's papers are cited, so if you cite yourself you can generally increase your rep. For further discussion of the linguistic and social functions of academic genres, see Loudermilk (2007). – Brandon Loudermilk Apr 19 '16 at 23:51
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    I often refrain from closing-as-dupe if I feel like it's a dupe of a question where I have an accepted (or highly-voted) answer, because I feel like that's a conflict of interest. This is especially problematic since I tend to stay in the [java] tag, where I have a dupehammer. Instead, I'll add a comment saying something like "I don't want to unilaterally close this due to the conflict of interest, but I believe this may be a dupe of ____". (Sometimes the dupe question ends up getting more attention and votes than the one I answered, which is a bit annoying, but oh well.) – yshavit Apr 20 '16 at 0:02
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    I don't really feel like this is addressing his question, which is getting at a broader problem he has with the reputation system and some of its biases. Saying he shouldn't do what he said he knows he shouldn't do doesn't really add anything. – vestlen Apr 20 '16 at 0:30
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    @yshavit: I'm not entirely sure how I see that as a conflict of interest. If you're confident that the question is a dupe, you should feel as confident voting to close that as any other question. – Makoto Apr 20 '16 at 1:07
  • Thanks for the support! I know it's an "unspoken rule", and I'm sure others do too, at least ones with higher reputation. It's not set in stone, which is why it tends to be ignored by some. All of these points conflict with my "I came here to help developers with their programming problems, not teach people how to write well-received posts." statement. I'll update my post with more details to further clarify! – Vince Emigh Apr 20 '16 at 2:24
  • @Makoto Confidence isn't a binary measure, though. Depending on where I am on the sliding scale, sometimes I will just close it as a dupe. (Regardless of the conflict of issue thing, I do sometimes wish I could cast a non-hammer close vote, when I'm pretty sure it's a dupe but want someone else to check me. SO's official policy and I will just have to agree to disagree on that.) – yshavit Apr 20 '16 at 3:54
  • @Makoto I have updated my post to hopefully give a clearer view of why I feel your suggestions are a lot easier said than done. It's a nice post, especially for bringing up the "fragmentation" aspect of answering duplicates, but it does not give me or any other "SO gamer" any incentive to actually stop, as from out perspective, the reasons for gaming seem to outweigh any potential damage we are causing (as I've mentioned in my updated post) /: – Vince Emigh Apr 20 '16 at 18:33
  • @VinceEmigh: Cool. I plan on updating this answer/response anyway. – Makoto Apr 20 '16 at 18:40
  • @VinceEmigh: I'm hoping that this answer isn't too boilerplate, and I hope you can get some suggestions from this. I can't say I can offer much since one's activity here isn't easy to define. But if you really are feeling like this doesn't help, I'd encourage a break from the site for a few days. – Makoto Apr 21 '16 at 0:54
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Spend a minute on thinking why you want to achieve 10K. Is it because you want to stop all these people posting stupid answers to clear duplicate questions and poorly researched posts? Do you really want to see them posting your previous posts as examples for "why this is accepted post and mine is not"?

There is really not much else coming with 10K - you can review posts in more organized manner, but 3K is mostly enough to do the same. You can indeed see deleted posts... but I'm really not sure if it is good for your health :).

Another consideration is your work will not be seen by anyone - answering poor questions and duplicates not going to make such posts to top of search results anywhere. And it usually takes full year for the same assignment to be given out again - so homework questions may gain another upvote after a year. That may be ok if your goal is to improve your writing skills and practice being ignored, but you need to make sure that is ok with you.

The only activity that to me sounds unconditionally good is promoting your own answers (assuming appropriate recommendations and not spam). Link to good existing answer in comment (helps poster) will likely bring you more voting visitors (help rep) than posting ok almost-duplicate (which may face higher quality standard/downvotes). Links in answers like "the XXXX part covered in linked answer" avoid duplication (good for site) and essentially forcing reader to visit other question (good for rep).

  • I agree. Most of the higher rep privileges are not that exciting. I was a little disappointed. Being able to see deleted posts is the the most useful (to me) but it also clutters up the screen. – Suragch Apr 20 '16 at 11:06
  • I have edited my post to better reflect the situation. Privileges aren't the primary reason, nor is creating posts that "live long". I understand once you reach a certain point, reputation starts losing it's moderation rewards. But badges are another motivator for answering duplicate questions, as well as the respect given to those with higher reputation (an example has been edited into my post). Most duplicates aren't of posts I've contributed to. I would be handing someone else reputation - I'd have to write my own answer, than flag using that (duplicate of a duplicate), which falls under... – Vince Emigh Apr 20 '16 at 19:37
  • ...the "Take one for the team. Sacrifice your own benefits to help the site. You know it's the right thing to do, and although the effects of one person doing the right thing won't be too noticeable, you could rest knowing you did a good thing." statement. It's not appealing. – Vince Emigh Apr 20 '16 at 19:40
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There are some points in your post that conflict with one another. You said one of the reasons you gamify Stack Overflow is:

I feel the competitive nature when gaming leads me to writing higher quality posts

And yet in your initial "problems with gamifying" list, you mention:

  1. Answering duplicates before they are marked duplicate, giving answers that are specific to the question being asked, albeit the "broader" answer in another post explains the situation pretty well.
  2. Answering questions that lack detail, then editing my answer as details are gained (rather than asking the asker to include more details, confirming the problem, before answering)
  3. Advertising my previous answers by slightly manipulating the subject at hand to make my advertised answer seem relevant, while understanding that the advertised answer may not be of any use to the OP (in hopes that bored wanderers will find it interesting)

All three of these indicate poor quality, not high quality.

  • In some cases dupes can be quality pointers to canonical or previously-existing Q&As, but the vast majority of dupes are bad and unhelpful.

  • Questions that lack detail should not be answered, because you're being dishonest and also guessing rather than providing a high-quality, well-researched answer.

  • Answers that advertise your previous answers are poor quality for similar reasons: by your own admission the previous answers aren't really relevant, and again, you're being dishonest about your intentions.

To really solve this problem, you should come to terms with this cognitive dissonance and determine what you really want here. Are you admitting that what you're doing is bad, and asking for help with changing your behavior, or are you asking if what you're doing is bad?

Do you want to focus on points? Or do you want to focus on quality? You have already admitted a problem and identified the negative actions and their catalysts. Now you have to decide whether to stop them and pursue a different course of action or to continue with your current behavior.

  • Answering a duplicate does not lead to lower quality posts, it hurts the site (which is why I want to stop) rather than me personally. Answering questions that lack detail only lead to a temporary drop in quality, which is then boosted by editing once the details have been given. Taking extra steps to implement an advertisement does not categorize the post as low quality. I was just stating that it's not done for the purpose of helping others, rather than gaining extra exposure for the advertised post, in hopes for more reputation. Read my edits, they better explain the situation. – Vince Emigh Apr 20 '16 at 19:18
  • Long story short, I care about both. I want reputation for the reasons stated in my post, but I also want to maintain/increase the quality of the site, which is why I posted this question. – Vince Emigh Apr 20 '16 at 19:19
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    @VinceEmigh It's difficult to see your own content objectively, especially when you have been following a gamified paradigm rather than a quality-first paradigm. Respectfully, the points I mentioned in my answer are more or less objective, depending on how you view SO's purpose. If you care about quality resources over helping people/getting points, then yeah, self-advertising, dupe answers, etc. are low-quality. Insofar as wanting both, that's when you read into the question as which one you want more. – TylerH Apr 20 '16 at 19:47
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If you want to reduce the negative side of gamification as a whole, you can do your part by discouraging other people from over-gamifying the site. In essence, make the gamification itself better.

Down-vote posts that exhibit problem-behaviors. What's useful or not is subjective, but you seem to already have an idea of what is useful and what isn't, so you should have little problem with this.

Doing that might have a bonus side-effect of helping you internalize the idea that certain negative behaviors are not things that you should be doing.

  • That's a lot easier said than done. Yes, I know it's wrong, but I also know that if I don't do it, I will be missing out on benefits that others gain from doing so (respect based on reputation, privileges, etc..). It would be similar to if someone decided to stop driving a car to help with pollution: person no longer drives because they know it's bad, but everyone else is doing it. So in reality, the pollution levels stay the same, but now the person who stopped driving has to put extra time/effort to get from one place to the other. It's a losing battle for the person doing the right thing /: – Vince Emigh Apr 20 '16 at 19:28
  • @VinceEmigh I don't think you understood my answer. It was not to simply stop gamifying yourself, at least not directly. It is to discourage other people's bad gamifying with your downvotes. – Sam I am says Reinstate Monica Apr 20 '16 at 19:34
  • The fact that it might make you hesitate more with your own gamifying is merely a potential side-effect – Sam I am says Reinstate Monica Apr 20 '16 at 19:35
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SO has been structured so that gamifiers will engage in constructive behavior. This effort has been somewhat successful. You probably already know this.

So the question becomes, how much of your gamifying behavior is not constructive to SO? I don't have a firm answer to this, but here's rule of thumb: if you are about to do something, ask yourself if you would downvote it if somebody else did it. Or maybe if you'd only be tempted to downvote it.

If the answer if yes, consider moderating yourself. It's the best moderation there is.

Another thing: don't be too hard on yourself. If a given action brings in a lot of rep points, maybe there's more merit to it than you think.

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    The current consensus seems to be that answering clear duplicates, what-is-the-regex-to, Advise Best Library For X, and plz fix my code, thanx are advancing! questions has no merits at all. Those answers do not Teach To Fish – they teach to beg instead of to work – and they lower the overall quality of Stack Overflow. – usr2564301 Apr 21 '16 at 14:09
  • @usr2564301 That is a sweeping generalization, and fairly incorrect at that. On answering duplicates, and on how-to questions (commonly referred to as "gimme teh codes"), 2. Don't worry about the asker. The answer isn't for the asker. I mean, yeah, it helps the asker, but the answer is for the future readers. If no one can ever find the question because of the over-specificity, what is the point? – user4639281 Sep 16 '17 at 23:57

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