1

What should happen with questions like this one:
If statement always true with enum in comparison
OP tries to provide us with all relevant data necessary. But he fails to narrow down the problem enough to produce a minimal working example.
He is clearly stuck and needs help. However this question will never be useful to everyone else.

My first instinct was to close or downvote the question. However a bunch of people found it upvote worthy. Which makes me wonder: How to handle questions like this?

3
  • 2
    That one is better than lots. You just need to ask for relevant bits of code. – user1228 Apr 7 '16 at 16:26
  • @Will It is better than lots of others. But does this make it good? – Tim Pohlmann Apr 11 '16 at 6:30
  • "You just need to ask for relevant bits of code." If you feel the question isn't worth anything without editing in code, vote to close as unclear. Guidance on downvotes is clear and plentiful, you can read up and use your judgement as to whether or not you should downvote. – user1228 Apr 11 '16 at 12:49
7

My first instinct was to close or downvote the question. However a bunch of people found it upvote worthy.

Which was correct IMHO.

What makes you think this is a good debugging question? Don't care about the upvotes. There's a number of possibly matching answers provided for the question, but none with any substantial proof.


Answerers (including me) sometimes tend to leave an upvote on a questions, even if it is still unclear.

But that might be a borderline decision, for me it depends if I can easily deduce a minimal testcase from the code shown easily (e.g. by adding a simple main() entry point or such, to compile and run the code).


Which makes me wonder: How to handle questions like this?

Help pages clearly state that debugging questions need a Minimal Testcase (emphasis mine):

  1. Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example.

Anyway you may leave a comment to ask the OP about improvement of their question providing a minimal testcase (as @Will proposed in their comment).

4
  • That's what I thought. Which leads me to the question why the question got upvoted. Anyway...Closing or downvoting? Closing I guess? – Tim Pohlmann Apr 7 '16 at 16:02
  • @TimPohlmann "Closing or downvoting? Closing I guess?" Both probably. – πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 7 '16 at 16:03
  • 6
    @TimPohlmann Lots of people like upvoting bad questions. It makes the OP feel better (in the short term) to get positive feedback, and that makes the voter feel better for making someone else feel better. They don't actually interact with all of the people harmed by their vote (all of the future readers that get directed to an unanswerable question) and so don't empathize with them. – Servy Apr 7 '16 at 16:15
  • I am not legion. A minor evil spirit, yes, but there's only one of me, unfortunately. – user1228 Apr 11 '16 at 12:51

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .