-5

I have a specific user that has done this to me twice in a row (on separate days), and it discourages me from making any further edits. This seems like a way in which someone could potentially commit malicious acts by overriding a specific user's edits again and again. A previous edit I had made was much more substantial than his. The recent edit was made far earlier. I believe the user may be appending "/edit/" to the end of the URL to allow them to edit the already edited questions.

Rejected edit: https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/11926547

Their revision: https://stackoverflow.com/posts/36470264/revisions

  • 2
    Why is this a feature request? What are you requesting here? – psubsee2003 Apr 7 '16 at 9:04
  • Change to an existing feature, regarding the ability to reject edits in favor of one's own or some way in which to prevent malicious actions against a specific user. – J.J. Apr 7 '16 at 9:05
  • 1
    And why do you think this was in any way malicious? Was anything done or said to make you think the user intentionally did anything to single you out to reject your edit? – psubsee2003 Apr 7 '16 at 9:06
  • It seems farfetched that the same user could do this basically twice in a row on two different dates with about 500 edits to their name. The probability is quite low. – J.J. Apr 7 '16 at 9:08
  • 3
    And yet it's true. Humans in general don't accept coincidences very well. We're kind of hardwired to look for patterns even when there are none. – Robert Longson Apr 7 '16 at 9:22
  • It isn't something that can be 100% definitively known either way, as his edit was made much later than mine and as I said, could have been made by appending to the URL. – J.J. Apr 7 '16 at 9:31
17

They didn't reject your edit, they simply started making an edit at the same time you did.

You are both interested in the same topics and you both started editing the posts at the same time. They had no way to know you were editing it and you had no way to know they were editing it till you both tried to apply your edits.

As they have an edit permission, their edit was applied and that had the unfortunate consequence of making it impossible for the system to apply your edit. The Community bot user then stepped in and rejected your edit.

If you feel you can still improve the post feel free to submit a new edit.

  • You can manually append /edit/ to the question link or answer link to open the normal edit GUI. So this is technically possible. – J.J. Apr 7 '16 at 9:10
  • 4
    @JordanJohnson Yes it is possible to get the edit GUI like that, but why do you think it happened? Just because it happened twice is not a strong enough evidence that he is intentionally attacking you. It happens frequently when you are editing new posts. – psubsee2003 Apr 7 '16 at 9:15
  • 1
    I said why it happened, you and he are interested in the same topics and you both started editing the posts at the same time. He had no way to know you were editing it and you had no way to know he was editing it till you both tried to apply your edits. He will always win because he has edit privileges. – Robert Longson Apr 7 '16 at 9:17
7

I believe the user may be appending "/edit/" to the end of the URL to allow them to edit the already edited questions.

While yes, this is possible, it is unnecessary. Edit reviewers already have the power to immediately reject edits right from the suggested edit review GUI and immediately apply their own edit.

edit review interferace

So there is no need to actually hack the URL as you described to bring up the edit window. And even if it did, because reviewers have the power to do reject and edit, hacking the URL really isn't even abuse of the system. In fact, it is actually better for you to have a edit conflict rejection instead of a straight rejection because edit conflicts do not count against you when calculating the edit ban (for having too many rejected edits).

The system is designed to prefer edits from users with full edit privileges (>2K rep) over suggested edits, so this type of rejection is always going to happen unless the design of the edit system is significantly changed.

What is more likely to have happened is the user simply encountered the post at roughly the same time as you. Both posts you are referring too were less than 30 minutes old at that point, so it is very easy for users hunting for posts to edit to stumble across them, possibly from other review queues (such as the First Posts, or Help and Improvement queues).

3

The answer by Robert Longson says it all, but I would like to add one more thing.

If you're worried that these rejected edits are unfair as it is coincidence that you came across an edit conflict, and you will get an editing ban because of this, that won't happen. Rejected edits because of edit conflicts do not count towards edit bans. So no need to worry. There have been a few proposals to make the edits that were rejected because of edit conflicts, to be known as disputed edits, but it has not yet been implemented (and not planned to be implemented).

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .