-39

I have realized that some kind of questions do not 'qualify' for the Stack Overflow scheme and fall into certain 'answering mechanism' by people answering, mainly because of the rules of the Stack Overflow.

I have observed this behavior is exclusive for Stack Overflow, and not present on forum sites, in which the attitude appears to be more "open-minded".

The rules of Stack Overflow are the finest in the history of the forum, but I am a bit aware of some 'rudeness' mainly because of the "reputation system".

Up so far, my findings on how the Answering Post (AP) replies to an Original Post (OP), based on their reputation, independent of their content, are the following:

  • Low reputation OP (OP Low) normally often don't come back, seek for fast solving problems, etc.

  • If the OP has much low reputation than the AP, the AP will critizise the OP content, in proportion with the reputation difference. First-poster OPs often got rejected or unanswered, independently of the content. This behavior would be a reaction to the above point.

  • The content of high reputation members (AP High) is more valued by other APs, independent of the value of the content itself. This could be an over-reaction to the last two points.

Regarding the content itself:

  • Debugging questions and code service questions are answered faster than design questions", even when code service questions are allegedly to be content out of scope.

  • Choice questions or design questions for example, to decide between a design A and a design B are naturally harder than find-the-error questions, and hence, prone to be marked "On Hold" or "Closed" without answers.

  • Discussion questions, such as code or standard compliance over certain applications, cannot be asked in technical communities, because of the policies of the communities, closing the debate.

Question/comment:

It is possible Stack Overflow is rejecting some important kind of content because of the rule structure?

closed as unclear what you're asking by davidism, Alexander O'Mara, the Tin Man, HaveNoDisplayName, Daedalus Mar 31 '16 at 3:05

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 4
    This is all very vague. Do you have a specific case-in-point, or some evidence to back up your assertions? – Robert Harvey Mar 30 '16 at 23:30
  • If the OP has much low reputation than the AP, the AP will critizise the OP content, in proportion with the reputation difference. I've almost never seen this from answerers. Some of commentors can be a bit sharp, I agree, but I've never seen any correlation between reputation and rudeness. – Rob Mar 30 '16 at 23:39
  • 27
    This is abject self-serving nonsense. I have to say, my tolerance for the word "rude" to describe the efforts of OS users to keep the site useful has reached zero. If you don't like it then go visit an 'open-minded forum' instead. Rude enough? – Hans Passant Mar 30 '16 at 23:43
  • @Robert Harvey. I have but, it would not wise puting them here, as per Makoto reccomendation. – Brethlosze Mar 30 '16 at 23:51
  • @Rob. Yes. I am not all my time here. But when i need a question, i reply some other as 'payment' -if one can say that-. So i standardly see how contents and questions fall into the "critizise first, check later" behavior. – Brethlosze Mar 30 '16 at 23:53
  • 2
    downvoting cause I'm closed-minded – Just Do It Mar 31 '16 at 0:01
  • 3
    @JustDoIt. It is nice to be honest... – Brethlosze Mar 31 '16 at 0:03
  • 4
    Another steaming pile of utter umm. unsubstantiated rhetoric with no evidence. – Martin James Mar 31 '16 at 0:30
  • @MartinJames. Thanks for your comment. Though dont clarify my question. – Brethlosze Mar 31 '16 at 0:50
  • 6
    independently of the content... actually no. Its because the content that is these users have written is rubbish, that is why they are down voted and closed. Nothing to do with newness. I even treat established users much harder if they ask bad questions, they should know better – JK. Mar 31 '16 at 1:17
  • 2
    On a scale from 1 to 10, how do you evaluate Stack Overflow usefulness on you daily coding? Myself, I can start an idea from scratch and finish an app without asking a single question. – brasofilo Mar 31 '16 at 5:45
  • 4
    @hypfco But we ARE open to new members. If the new members do their homework, check what is on topic, and follow the rules. Everyone loves to make Stack sound like we're elitist jerks. I lurk meta enough to tell you that normally people who say that cannot ask an on topic question to save their lives. A lot of the active members are REALLY getting tired of this and get more vocal. That doesn't change the fact I love to see new members here. Those that respect the site and community do VERY well. – Patrice Mar 31 '16 at 15:57
  • 1
    @Patrice. I am elitist, being elitist is good, technical content is not for everybody. The views of some guru members in here -like Hans Passant- is in some way clear, and should be stated clearly. Put a message to "remember your question can be put on hold and closed if not accepted by the community", crystal clear :). That is simple and understandable, and reduce frustration from members. – Brethlosze Mar 31 '16 at 16:42
  • 3
    @hypfco but see that's the thing. It's not elitism, it's keeping a quality standard. The way you're writing, it seems as if new users are targeted because they are new users. It's not the fact. Bad posts are targeted. – Patrice Mar 31 '16 at 16:43
  • 2
    If the people are really that harsh, how can I grow from a 1 rep user to a 5k user? Low rep users are not criticized because of their low rep, but because of their low quality content. – Sweeper May 2 '16 at 12:04
26

First poster OPs often got rejected or unanswered, independently of the content.

I'd like to see some evidence of that. Answering questions is the main motivation on Stack Overflow, because of the reputation system. Answers are the most reliable way to gaining upvotes.

It is not rational behaviour to not answer a question because of the OP's rep.

It is certainly true that first-time OPs' questions get downvoted and closed disproportionately. But I'd like to see some actual evidence that that's independently from the question's content.

The much more likely explanation is that first-time posters' content tends to be bad in a format that doesn't work on the site more often.

It is possible SO is rejecting some important kind of content because of the rule structure?

What does "important" mean exactly?

It's definitely not important to the site's growth, or it would have started declining a long time ago.

Not every question needs to have a place on Stack Overflow. There are other places on the web.

"Choice Question" or "Design Questions" for example, to decide between a Design A and a Design B are naturally harder than "Find the Error Questions", and hence, prone to be marked "On Hold" or "Closed" without answers.

If you care to do a little bit of research in the site's history, you'll find that there's years and years of debate and hard thinking about what to do with these kinds of questions, and that they were once allowed. That they are "hard" has nothing to do with why they no longer are.

"Debugging Questions" and "Code Service Questions" are answered faster than "Design Questions", even when "Code Service Questions" are allegedly to be content out of scope.`

Consider the possibility that in a community with hundreds of thousands of users, some value rep gain more than the community's rules and quality standards.

It's shocking, I know.

If the OP has much low reputation than the AP, the AP will criticise the OP content, in proportion with the reputation difference. First poster OPs often got rejected or unanswered, independently of the content. This behavior would be a reaction to the above point.

That does not match my experience at all. Try asking a silly/off topic question as a high-reputation user and you will see it gets criticized and closed more quickly and harshly than those from low-reputation users. Because a higher standard is applied to you.

I have observed this behavior is exclusive for SO, and not present in other forums, in which the attitude appears to be more "open-minded".

True. Now compare the average usefulness and quality of those other forums, and Stack Overflow's. Notice something?

David Robinson once commented on an article critical of Stack Overflow on Medium:

That city's littering laws are too strict. I'd leave, but for some reason every other city is covered in garbage.

The general theory around here is that to have a somewhat high-quality place, you need strict rules.

That is not to say that everything on Stack Overflow is exactly as it should be.

I agree the community is sometimes too harsh, and users can be rude. I'd be wary of sending, say, my mom here to ask a question. Sadly, not everyone always adheres to the "be nice" rule.

But the general direction around here is very explicitly a narrow scope, and strictly enforced content rules, and most of us stand behind that.

Stack Overflow isn't for everyone, and some effort is always required when asking a question.

  • 1
    That "first poster OPs often got [sic] rejected or unanswered" is undisputed. It is the "independently of the content" part that is suspect. – Robert Harvey Mar 30 '16 at 23:34
  • @Robert yeah, I'm currently editing, your edit threw me off a bit :) (it was appreciated though) – Pekka 웃 Mar 30 '16 at 23:35
  • Funny how many edits are getting here.... – Brethlosze Mar 30 '16 at 23:58
  • 2
    "It is certainly true that first-time OPs' questions get downvoted and closed disproportionately." [citation needed] – Braiam Mar 31 '16 at 0:26
  • @Braiam. Lol. But this is not a proof, this is a policy for "not properly formatted" questions..... – Brethlosze Mar 31 '16 at 0:57
14

It is possible SO is rejecting some important kind of content because of the rule structure?

Important to whom? Of course some perfectly good content is being rejected. That's the price we pay for trying to keep the site focused on the kinds of content the community here wants to curate. We're not here to be all things. That's a failed model.

  • Important is technically relevant. Most most questions are just trash though and i agreed with that... – Brethlosze Mar 31 '16 at 0:02
3

Let's get some things out the way first:

"Debugging Questions" and "Code Service Questions" are answered faster than "Design Questions", even when "Code Service Questions" are allegedly to be content out of scope.

While it's unclear what you mean specifically by "code service question", debugging questions are faster by nature to answer due to the propensity of Stack Overflow demanding that users create an MCVE before the question could be deemed answerable. Also, code that is readily copied and pasted into one's IDE is straightforward enough to step through.

To put a bit of a fine point on it, "code service" questions analogous to "do this for me" or "how do I solve X" are generally off topic, and should be closed if spotted. Design questions are also off-topic, and depending on their nature, may be a better fit for Programmers.SE (but it really depends).

"Choice Question" or "Design Questions" for example, to decide between a Design A and a Design B are naturally harder than "Find the Error Questions", and hence, prone to be marked "On Hold" or "Closed" without answers.

Yup! This is intended. Those sorts of questions always attract opinions. We're trying to be a repository of answers by experts, and opinions don't have much room here.

"Discussion Questions", such as Code or Standard complaince over certain applications, cannot be asked in technical communities, because of the policies of the communities, closing the debate.

These are likely off-topic too due to their nature: they're broad by definition. What standard? Who am I making what compliant with? They fall in the same category as above.


All of that is to say, yes, we do lose a lot of questions, but we do everything in our power to retain the questions we want to keep around. If you're ever concerned about a question or the state of a question, you can ask a question here on Meta about it and get some objective feedback from the community.

(Just be aware: providing a link to a question here will likely result in a lot of people voting on it.)

  • I am not putting link to questions for the same reason :). I would just say that i copypasted a question here and in eng-tips.com. My question here was marked on hold, and the eng-tips.com is filled with technical answers. My first choice is always SO. Because i like this system. And ussualy one would expect that if you question once, you should answer once too. And not answer all time, because that would not be correct. So a few questions per year -AFAIK- should be a nice participation. But that put you on the 'novice' league here.... – Brethlosze Mar 30 '16 at 23:48
  • 1
    I can't speak to that other site's curation policy. All I know is how Stack Overflow operates. We're different to other places. – Makoto Mar 30 '16 at 23:49
  • Yeah, and i like SO and i "dont" like other forums. But my needs are stronger. I would just say that the MCVE phylosophy is propagated to other technical forums, like that methodology is certainly not applicable. – Brethlosze Mar 30 '16 at 23:56

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .