TL;DR We’re launching a series of tests designed to help us better educate new community members about Q&A and all the new products we’re launching.

Many of you already know about all the new projects we’re building to serve programmers even better. We have a lot going on: Jobs has already shipped, Documentation is now in closed beta, and Teams is being actively worked on.

With all these changes, we need to update and improve how we introduce new members to what Stack Overflow represents as well as create useful public guides for the new projects we’re shipping.

What’s the problem we’re trying to solve?

The short version is this: we don’t have a consolidated place for people who don’t know what Stack Overflow is to learn more about us and how to contribute to our community.

What we do have currently includes the tour page, various Meta posts, individual blog posts, and the banners shown to users not signed into an account (or those who don’t yet have an account) in each of the main feature pages. To see the latter for yourself, log out or open a private window and go to Jobs, Documentation, or the home page in a private window.

We need a solution that consolidates these fragmented explanations and better answers the questions of who we are, what we do, and how new community members can participate.

Here’s what’s going to happen

We want all programmers to feel welcome in our community, and improving their first experiences with the site is a good step in this direction. We’re launching a series of A/B tests with different designs to solve this problem. Here’s what’s included in our tests and updates:

  • A single destination that gives a general overview of Q&A and our new products like Jobs and Documentation. This page is akin to “Features” pages you see on other sites that give a short description of each “thing” that the site offers.
  • A prominent way to get to the above described destination from stackoverflow.com. This probably means changing the hero banner that users see when they’re logged out and on the homepage.
  • Individual pages that go in-depth into each of our features with Q&A, the community sites, and Jobs to start, with Docs and Teams forthcoming.
  • Possibly links to our client site and our company “about us” pages, in case they aren’t a developer and need to get to the right place.

So what might change while these experiments happen?

For the vast majority of you, you won’t notice anything unless your first interaction with the site tends to be to log in. The areas that this series of experiments touches are the things that current users don’t see most of the time. This is mainly about educating people who don’t yet know or use Stack Overflow. That means that anonymized portions of our homepage and the tour page are the only existing places that might be affected - everything else is pretty new. Even then, only a relatively small proportion of users are going to see the changes anyways since it’s a split test.

Your Thoughts

We’d love your help on this. Specifically, we want to know what made you want to join Stack Overflow in the first place so that we can share that same excitement with new members.

  • Was there a particular blog or Meta post or other piece of content that convinced you to sign up?
  • How did you learn how to contribute on Stack Overflow?
  • What first got you excited about Stack Overflow and made you want to contribute?
  • 14
    Great minds think alike – Robert Harvey Mar 29 '16 at 18:28
  • 4
    Oy! I was just about to link to that, @Robert! – Oded Mar 29 '16 at 18:29
  • 23
    "How did you learn how to contribute on Stack Overflow?" I read the help pages. >.> Maybe I'm not good to give that particular feedback... I'm a weirdo who reads, after all. ^^' – Kendra Mar 29 '16 at 18:39
  • 1
    I was taught about the tricks of contributing on Stack Overflow by the peers at Python Chatroom – Bhargav Rao Mar 29 '16 at 18:40
  • 3
    I've always liked what google does...When they come out with a new app or a feature they can tell based on the login and what they do is kind of fade out or make the background kind of transparent and show some arrows with how things work. As you click "I got it!" it arrows and zooms into something else...you can always skip this tutorial but its a great way to show people how to use an application. – JonH Mar 29 '16 at 18:45
  • How many parameters are you changing at once? A good experiment doesn't dive too deep. – Deer Hunter Mar 29 '16 at 19:53
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    @RobertHarvey don't hold your breath. Sites you worry about at MSE will get such a feature in 6-to-8 weeks. Meanwhile, SO users will read explanation proposed here, figure that their questions won't fit and go try their luck elsewhere... that is, at other sites in SE network. Business as usual, things went this way ever since burning down SO close queue two years ago – gnat Mar 29 '16 at 21:41
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    Know your target audience. Which is certainly not the kind of people that will respond to this poll. The leads are kinda obvious, anybody with a newish account. Biggest problem you have to solve is that you got a lot of junk data right now, a user that created his 10th account is not your target. Fix that first, ditch OpenID. Best time to learn something about the new user is at account creation time, he'll take the time to answer a few questions. – Hans Passant Mar 30 '16 at 9:59
  • 1
    Shouldn't already signed up but still new users be targeted too? Its right that I need to read the help pages and search the meta posts, but I can't search for a feature that I do not know that it exists in the first place. (I just recently learned that there is a feature called 'stack snippet' - it is not mentioned in the formatting help - and I just learned that there are a lot of short cuts ) – Rhayene Mar 30 '16 at 13:21
  • 7
    "We want all programmers to feel welcome in our community" we do? Since when? I thought this site was for professional and enthusiast programmers. So only professionals, enthusiasts, and those that act like them, are welcome. Or has that changed? – Raedwald Mar 30 '16 at 17:24
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    @Raedwald We want all programmers to feel welcome in our community, since forever. What specific type of programmer is left out of the "professional and enthusiast" categorization? By my estimate, that pretty much covers every single programmer I've ever met. Some people code for money, some for fun, and some for both - and all of them are welcome here. We do have certain rules and guidelines we expect people to follow, but everyone should start from a sense of welcoming. – Laura Mar 30 '16 at 17:59
  • 3
    @Laura "every single programmer I've ever met". Likewise. met. But the numerous posters of crap questions, especially the bad homework questions, are neither. Or behave like neither. – Raedwald Mar 30 '16 at 19:46
  • "Great minds think alike" - I hope this was meant as a joke, Mr. Harvey ;) – AGuyCalledGerald Mar 31 '16 at 8:46
  • Would be great to finally tell new users somewhere that they should stay with the question and not just walk away and come back when the question is already closed: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/156761/… – juergen d Apr 1 '16 at 21:37

Was there a particular blog or Meta post or other piece of content that convinced you to sign up?

I honestly don't remember. I most likely stumbled onto an answer to a question I was asking in a Google Search.

How did you learn how to contribute on Stack Overflow?

I lurked.

What first got you excited about Stack Overflow and made you want to contribute?

Reputation points. To be fair, though, I always wanted my answers to be helpful.

We want all programmers to feel welcome in our community, and improving their first experiences with the site is a good step in this direction.

The single most impactful thing you can do in this regard is this: Help new users understand that...

This isn't a forum!

We're not anything like other internet forums. Everything you already know about using other forums is not going to work here. Learn Stack Exchange on its own terms; embrace the unique philosophies that make Stack Exchange such a great place to find help. You and the SE user community you're engaging with will both be happier.

Was there a particular blog or Meta post or other piece of content that convinced you to sign up?

Quora has a Question. One of the answers say

Get a stackoverflow account and learn to use the site. If you don't at least know that StackOverflow is an available resource, and you're an english-speaking programmer, you're doing it wrong.

That got me really intrigued about what's so special about stackoverflow and I signed up.

Update It has been pointed out that none of the answers say that. Here is a screenshot of the answer I am referring to.

enter image description here

  • 8
    So Quora does have some valid content... – Barry Mar 30 '16 at 20:34
  • Noe of the answers say that. Only your first line is their in an answer, but none of the other lines are their. The only line their which mentioned Stack Overflow was "Get a Stack Overflow account and learn to use the site. (Link: Stack Overflow)". – fortunate_man Mar 31 '16 at 5:33
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    @AshishAhujaツ There is an answer. I added a screenshot of the quora answer in my answer. – Aseem Bansal Mar 31 '16 at 8:22
  • 1
    ^^ Oh, that's my mistake. Sorry :( – fortunate_man Mar 31 '16 at 8:58

The Problem

we don’t have a consolidated place for people who don’t know what Stack Overflow is to learn more about us and how to contribute to our community

Is this an opportunity to use the new Documentation feature to document how to use Stack Overflow? Or is that perhaps too much of a stretch for something which is supposed to document code more than process. I think it could fit.

If not, including the "more info" pages from meta tag wikis as links or verbatim somewhere inside of the help center could also provide the home for this information while at the same time making it readily available to consolidate into one place (combining multiple tag wikis into a help page for example).

That would require expansion though. The current tag wiki for the questions tag is pretty abysmal from an information standpoint.

The questions tag should be used when you ask a question on meta that is referencing question(s) on the main site. For example, if you have a question about why questions on Stack Overflow are of such low quality, you should include the questions tag.

Would it be too much to go on here explaining what questions are with regards to the definition at Stack Overflow? This tag isn't just for referencing a single question (that is the tag), it is for referencing the topic of questions. How to improve them, what they are, perhaps why they are important, etc. This area could be a potential home for a lot more information that can be used elsewhere to educate users while still being logically separated.

Furthermore, following this approach new features such as Teams or Jobs could easily be kept up to date in the relevant tag both separating out information in a logical fashion while being able to be referenced in a composite elsewhere.


Questionnaire

Was there a particular blog or Meta post or other piece of content that convinced you to sign up?

What convinced me to sign up was seeing so many quality solutions that furthered the development of my current project. When I finally got truly stuck, I asked a question and signed up.

How did you learn how to contribute on Stack Overflow?

I like to consider myself able to self educate. When I first signed up to ask a question, I also then had the ability to answer. So I set out to try to learn and answer whatever the newest question list had to offer. It offered several opportunities to learn about new topics, but answering in unfamiliar areas such as LaTex for example proved to not really be possible (perhaps it was a naive endeavor - I was just trying to help and learn).

What first got you excited about Stack Overflow and made you want to contribute?

I like giving back. Stack Overflow gave me so much help with development that I wanted to also help the community that contributed to helping solve my problems.

  • I thought tag wikis were for documenting how the tag should be used, not a definition of the word itself? blog.stackoverflow.com/2011/03/redesigned-tags-page – Heretic Monkey Mar 29 '16 at 21:31
  • @MikeMcCaughan - It wouldn't just be a definition of the word, but as Atwood puts it in your link, the first two pages of tags should have excellent tag wiki excerpts at a minimum. If they have great, complete tag wikis, that's even better. It is in this point of view that the 30,000 character limit was set in order to really flesh out these wikis. Furthermore, while he does state the wiki should show how the tag is used, it should also have several other key data points including "what a tag means to your community", and defining highly specialized concepts (such as question asking). – Travis J Mar 29 '16 at 21:37
  • Fair enough. I do like the idea of using the tools we already have. – Heretic Monkey Mar 29 '16 at 21:48

Was there a particular blog or Meta post or other piece of content that convinced you to sign up?

Not really. I registered because I wanted to vote on content, and I started answering questions to get the necessary reputation to do so.

How did you learn how to contribute on Stack Overflow?

Sure, I read the tour, and like a lot of new users I ignored some of it. I basically got a general idea of what to do, and then I just jumped right in letting the community correct my mistakes. Most of my experience has come from helpful comments (especially on my bad posts) or meta posts.

For example, I've been guilty of posting a non-answer that was really a comment asking for clarification. I didn't have the 50 reputation, and I misinterpreted the commenting privilege for a convenience feature. The community was quick to correct my misunderstanding with helpful comments, and I self deleted my non-answer. I think some of this misunderstanding stemmed from my previous experience with forums. I just didn't consider that posting a non-answer was super distracting and irrelevant to the question.

What first got you excited about Stack Overflow and made you want to contribute?

In my case, it was a single obscure but super helpful post that got me exciting to join the community. Previously, I had used Stack Overflow in college for quick references since it was usually the first or second hit for a google search. My questions and their answers had hundreds of votes already, so I didn't feel that my vote was needed at all.

I first registered after I started coding professionally. My questions were becoming quite specific, and the related posts I found were not nearly as prominent. I had searched the internet for a few hours trying to figure out how to configure some component from a common library, and I finally found a Stack Overflow post that cited a Github discussion claiming that my intended implementation was impossible. That probably saved me another half-day of searching, and that was when I realized that I wanted give back. I wanted to save someone a half-day of work by devoting just a small amount of my time.

We want all programmers to feel welcome in our community, and improving their first experiences with the site is a good step in this direction.

I spend a large amount of the day reading questions. Sadly there are many very low quality questions, mostly coming from first time users. We already have a page describing the basics of the community like How to ask and all. But frankly, nobody spends so much time going through such pages, and surely not when they have a problem that they are trying to solve from a long time, and really wants to get an answer for.

IMHO, we should give a little consideration on making it such that new comers would get the Idea about the community without having to go through large documentations.

Was there a particular blog or Meta post or other piece of content that convinced you to sign up?

Nope. I used to search a lot for solving the problems i used to come across. Many times, I came across SO posts which helped me. Finally when I had a question to ask, I signed up.

How did you learn how to contribute on Stack Overflow?

My goal at start was never to contribute. I signed up only to solve a problem I had faced. But as my first question received an overwhelming 21 upvotes, I thought this wasn't a bad place at all.

My first posts were just questions. But as I realized that there was something called reputation. I starting contributing to SO for two things: Helping others and gaining reputation. But once I reached about 1000 reputation, I was tired of this reputation. Thus at around 1600 reputation I offered 450 of my reputation on different bounties.

So in short words, I learned to contribute to SO through reputation (during low rep times).

What first got you excited about Stack Overflow and made you want to contribute?

At first Reputation. I like games, and took this as a game at the low rep stages. Though, I always put effort in my answers.


We want all programmers to feel welcome in our community, and improving their first experiences with the site is a good step in this direction.

I've seen most new users posts (mainly questions) getting hugely downvoted. This is because their questions are off-topic, show no effort or just "give me the codez" question.

Users who read the help pages before posting something are mostly better in their posts than users who just directly post their questions. To be honest, reading the help pages before posting a question feels boring to many people who just want an answer to their question. I felt the same, and did not read it before posting my first question (even though I read it afterwards).

I would like to tell most new users that

This is a site for solving programming problems!

Stack Overflow is a website in which users will help you to solve problems you face while programming. This site doesn't provide advice on resources, nor a magic tool which makes your error-filled code working. Please post what you've tried, your code, details and what is wrong in your code. Without you helping us by posting necessary requirements in your question, we cannot help you.

Please do not think that this is a bad site, if your first question receives a massive negative score. Votes are only used to decide the quality of posts. You can think as your question to be poor if it received downvotes. Before posting a question, please search thoroughly, as most questions are already answered.

Massive downvotes are a sign of poor questions, but please do not feel discouraged. Failure is a stepping stone to success

The basic idea I'm trying to convey is, most new users think that their poor quality questions are good questions. A few users I've seen who realize afterwards that their question is off-topic, and sometimes even apologize:

Sorry, I thought this kind of question is allowed here.

Mainly we need to make sure that they do not get discouraged, and also post good quality questions.

I think having something like this will be quite useful if it's done right! My introduction to Stack Exchange was Stack Overflow, but honestly I wasn't very aware of how many other useful sites there are in the network and what kinds of questions get asked there for a long time. I think having a larger and broader tour for the whole of the network is a good idea as long as we don't make it too overwhelming.

Also, I think that lurking is one of the best ways to teach folks how things work, maybe there should be a note somewhere in there that suggests hanging around for a bit to get a feel for the ropes before diving in. It would only work on new users who actually care, but I do believe there still are some of those.


Was there a particular blog or Meta post or other piece of content that convinced you to sign up?

I, like many, many others before me, essentially found Stack Overflow through much exposure to helpful answers found via Google. I signed up when I had a question the answer to which I could not for the life of me find anywhere.

How did you learn how to contribute on Stack Overflow?

Mainly, I lurked and observed, and read a few Help topics when I got curious about a particular interaction I saw.

It turned out that I never asked the question I signed up to ask because I solved it myself first, and my first question ended up self-answered (yay, Tumbleweed!) - therefore I had the benefit of awhile just lurking as a lowly 1-repper to observe the good, the bad, and the ugly before I asked my first actual question.

What first got you excited about Stack Overflow and made you want to contribute?

When I got my first really good answer, I essentially wanted to give back. Sometimes I'd use the opportunities on an interesting question to go learn something new. Though I will say, the extra privileges that come with those first few rep limits were attractive, too.

Was there a particular blog or Meta post or other piece of content that convinced you to sign up?

I was a reader of Joel Spolsky's Joel on Software blog, and his post announcing the launch intrigued me. I didn't sign up right away, but once I saw it was catching fire, and that I could find answers to my questions, I did.

How did you learn how to contribute on Stack Overflow?

I started by answering questions. I found there were a few where I had faced similar issues and had figured it out on my own. I've only ever asked one question, which was in an admittedly niche area of development, and therefore got few views, fewer votes, and even fewer answers. Rather than finding it disheartening, I realized I had asked about a pretty obscure topic and shrugged.

What first got you excited about Stack Overflow and made you want to contribute?

I really liked how it wasn't like the fora that dominated the programming world at the time. I hated the MSDN fora, and kept getting expertsexchange.com results in my searches, which I hated even more. SO was a breath of fresh air; a place where you can find answers to the kinds of questions that software development experts ask, and get thoughtful answers in exchange. All without a paywall, without obnoxious ads, and without the name-calling and random other craziness of the internet at large.

We want all programmers to feel welcome in our community, and improving their first experiences with the site is a good step in this direction.

I think that programmers who put in a genuine effort toward making their questions well-researched, on-topic, and clear do feel welcome. I'm not sure how much better an experience you can have than getting a well-written, on point answer from experts in your field. But answers like that don't grow on trees, and anyone who thinks they should be able to jump on the internet and without doing any work whatsoever get an answer like that should be made to feel unwelcome.

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