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Need some clarification on the justification to put this question on hold: Executing functions on dynamically loaded elements

My question was not one "Seeking debugging help" therefore, an MCV is not required. I was asking about the general layout of a program and whether or not it is possible to tell when another program is done executing some code, without necessarily using the callback.

Maybe the question is off topic for another reason, but I was a little bit surprised to find the question was put on hold. I feel like in the HTML and Javascript tags any question that people see without any code posted, instead of actually reading the question just automatically assume that it needs to have some sort of code posted with it, meanwhile I think the question was pretty clear.

It was basically answered in the comments, but I would like some clarification on this to see if I am looking at this the wrong way. Thanks.

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    I think a code sample would help illustrate your question, but I don't think it would have been required. I wouldn't have closed it for no-MCVE, but it is a little unclear, and perhaps too-broad. – Alexander O'Mara Mar 22 '16 at 18:56
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    The on hold options are sometimes difficult to choose between. Also, if close-voters choose more than one option (which they might when there's a vague feeling that the question quality needs improving, but no pre-canned close options are an exact fit), you don't get to see that. – Neil Slater Mar 22 '16 at 19:22
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    @NeilSlater Personally if the close reason is at all ambiguous I always think it is good to leave a comment behind explaining why. It is fine not to when the close reason is a good fit, but otherwise it leaves those asking the question feeling a little aggrieved – Michael B Mar 22 '16 at 19:30
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    How I'd approached the problem: 1) try out something to achieve the goal. 2) done some research about the subject and try something else 3) Post the code that I have produced which doesn't work, describe what the behaviour should be. 4) Profit for a well received question. General questions aren't usually well received because either they look like failed debugging questions or they look too broad*/*primarily opinion based. – Bakuriu Mar 22 '16 at 19:42
  • If you have code, you should edit it in. In all likelihood this question will be reopened. However, without extra information it will probably be closed again as well. Have you considered using promises? What about using a callback wasn't working for you? At the very least it needs expansion. – Travis J Mar 22 '16 at 19:57
  • @TravisJ Honestly, don't know too much about promises or what they do. I have heard of them, but never actually understood what they are used for or how they work. As for code... why isn't pseudo code acceptable? The workings of the program are basically spelled out – Adjit Mar 22 '16 at 20:19
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    The main issue is that there is no explicit definition of which area of the design can be changed. This is a big deal when attempting to solve one of these situations. Is the consumer malleable or only the script? Is the call without arguments? There is just a decent amount of vagueness left that requires guessing. While guessing can be correct, it is also very easy to provide a solution which is valid but doesn't work because of some new constraint just brought to light by the solution's suggestion. That may not be the case here, but that happens far too often with vagueness. – Travis J Mar 22 '16 at 20:22
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I'm one of the people who closed your question, so I'll explain why I did so.

The close reason I chose may not be the best, "unclear what you're asking" might have been better, but the most important part is that your question should contain some example code (maybe even pseudo-code would be enough). Without any code the question is rather unclear — there isn't enough information to answer it. If someone attempted to answer it, the answer likely would not work for you, because the answerer wouldn't have taken into account some specific condition which you haven't included in the question.

I think @TravisJ expressed best what I'm trying to say in a comment:

The main issue is that there is no explicit definition of which area of the design can be changed. This is a big deal when attempting to solve one of these situations. Is the consumer malleable or only the script? Is the call without arguments? There is just a decent amount of vagueness left that requires guessing. While guessing can be correct, it is also very easy to provide a solution which is valid but doesn't work because of some new constraint just brought to light by the solution's suggestion. That may not be the case here, but that happens far too often with vagueness.

It has also been explained in the comments (by @Bakuriu) what you should have done:

How I'd approached the problem:

  1. Try out something to achieve the goal.
  2. Research about the subject and try something else.
  3. Post the code that I have produced which doesn't work, describe what the behaviour should be.

To conclude: add some code and specify more details. Don't make people guess what you're trying to achieve.

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