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Since the CVs and Reviews have been increased to 60, and even before that, when I review close votes early and then go on to first posts / triage, I often cannot complete the review queues well and have to skip a lot due to vote limits.

I'm all for crushing the close votes queue but giving you exactly as many reviews as votes has made the problem significantly worse and is now tacitly encouraging to be more lenient on posts (the more CV you have left, the more you can review) or skipping a ton until you come across good content.

Does anyone have an idea how I personally and people in general can complete all the review queues in a given day without being artificially lenient, and is it even intended that people complete all review queues in a given day?

If that is not the case, why not flat out rate limit shared across all reviews?

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It's my understanding that it's not intended for you to complete a session in the close vote queue every day. In fact, doing so is largely an edge case compared to normal use:

That said, very few people hit the cap regularly - in the past 90 days, only 160 voters have hit the cap even once, and only one person on Stack Overflow has used 100% of their close votes every. single. day. Lookin' at you, bluet.

The SO team would probably suggest you either hit the other queues first or just tell yourself to stop after 30/40 reviews. I'm sure they don't want to artificially limit users from completing the queue "for their own good". That would not only punish everybody trying to use their reviews (in which case why offer more to begin with?), it would also harm the site because fewer questions would be closed.

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    If the queue allowed me, I would gladly burn 500 CVs on days where I have nothing else to do. – mag Mar 21 '16 at 14:24
  • @Magisch As would I, but as you can see from the link above, we're in the extreme minority. – TylerH Mar 21 '16 at 14:27
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    The number of people who regularly hit the cap is so small as to be effectively non-existent, @Magisch. It's a cap, not a quota - there's no reason to hit it unless you've really nothing else to do. Ideally, you're setting a limit for yourself based on how much time you have to spare, not sacrificing yourself on the altar of Review. – Shog9 Mar 21 '16 at 17:28
  • @Shog9 My employer lets me use 3 hours or more a day on stack overflow during work hours. Add another 1-2 when im at home. I have a lot of time on this site. – mag Mar 21 '16 at 18:44
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    @Magisch If you spend 5 hours a day in review, I might suggest getting fresh air and stepping away from your machine. – Taryn Mar 21 '16 at 18:46
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    @Magisch 5 hours? Good grief. At that point, i think the thing that needs reviewing is you... :P – Damien H Mar 22 '16 at 5:06
  • Part of the thing that concerns me about more close votes is that the people who do a lot of reviewing are going to burn out quicker. I wonder what would happen if the cap was 10, would there suddenly be a lot more people doing it more regularly? – DavidG Mar 22 '16 at 9:42
  • @DavidG I doubt it. At least not still after a week or so. Right now there's only about a couple hundred people who review each day, as I recall. – TylerH Mar 22 '16 at 12:53
  • @TylerH I don't know how it would go, but reducing limits often has contradictory effects. Like reducing the speed limit on certain roads from 70mph to 55mph actually increases traffic flow and people get to work faster. – DavidG Mar 22 '16 at 12:57
  • @DavidG Yes because fewer people drive on it. – TylerH Mar 22 '16 at 13:14
  • @TylerH Actually not the case. I don't have the study to hand unfortunately, but I believe the number of cars increased slightly. There's a ripple effect caused by faster drivers breaking hard, that cascades backwards causing massive jams behind them. – DavidG Mar 22 '16 at 13:25

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