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Many real life projects contain code that mixes up tab-based indentation with space-based indentation.

In different editors, tabs don't always correspond with the same number of spaces. For example, JSFiddle uses 2 spaces, Netbeans uses 4 spaces and Gedit uses 8 spaces.

Both StackOverflow's markup editor and the code sample use 4 spaces, which makes it easy to correctly indent code copy-pasted from pretty much anywhere for your code samples, no matter whether the indentation contains tabs, spaces or a mix of both.

Unfortunately, Stack Snippets use a different implementation. In Stack Snippets, a tab corresponds not with 4 but with 8 spaces. That makes it pretty difficult and tedious to properly indent code copy-pasted from many real life projects and is the cause of some of the nastiest indentation problems I've seen on StackOverflow. Additionally, tab indentations at the start of a line of code behave extra weird while editing.

I consider this a bug and would really appreciate it if this could get fixed! To illustrate the problem, I put some examples below.


Example 1

The following code uses 4 spaces to mark it as code and tabs for indentation.

Code sample :

a {
    color: blue;
    text-decoration : underline;
}

a.special {
    color: red;
    text-decoration : none;
}

Stack Snippet :

a {
	color: blue;
	text-decoration : underline;
}
    
a.special {
	color: red;
	text-decoration : none;
}

While the additional indentation for the Stack Snippets is kinda ugly, it's still pretty readable.


Example 2

The following code uses only tabs for indentation.

Code sample :

a {
    color: blue;
    text-decoration : underline;
}

a.special {
    color: red;
    text-decoration : none;
}

Stack Snippet :

a {
	color: blue;
	text-decoration : underline;
}
    
a.special {
	color: red;
	text-decoration : none;
}

This Stack Snippet looks exactly the same as the snippet in example # 1... except while editing. Then, it looks pretty messed up, which is véry confusing!


Example 3

The following code mixes up tabs and spaces.

Code sample :

a {
    color: blue;
    text-decoration : underline;
}

a.special {
    color: red;
    text-decoration : none;
}

Stack Snippets :

a {
	color: blue;
    text-decoration : underline;
}

a.special {
    color: red;
	text-decoration : none;
}

Here, the indentation of the Stack Snippet is particularly nasty. And, again, it looks different while editing.

What makes things worse, is that the indentation in the markup editor itself looks perfect, as it also does in the previous two examples.

As a consequence, trying to fix indentations that mix tabs with spaces is a nightmare and often involves having to replace every single tab with 4 spaces.

  • 1
    "In code editors, a tab often corresponds with 4 spaces." [citation needed] – Braiam Mar 19 '16 at 22:18
  • @Braiam : I replaced that statement with In different editors, tabs don't always correspond with the same number of spaces. For example, JSFiddle uses 2 spaces, Netbeans uses 4 spaces and Gedit uses 8 spaces. – John Slegers Mar 19 '16 at 22:27
  • Nice find. Seems they should get the one outlier - which is also relatively new - in line. – Deduplicator Mar 20 '16 at 0:06
  • 9
    Solution: Just use this character instead. Always lines up, no mater how many you put. </satire> – Alexander O'Mara Mar 20 '16 at 0:15
  • I don't know how you get 8 spaces when you press tab in stack snippets editor, I always get two, which is highly annoying. – Tiny Giant Mar 20 '16 at 18:49
  • @TinyGiant : In the editor, I get 4 spaces. In the display, I get 8 spaces. I never get 2 spaces. If you do get 2 spaces, I guess that means there are also browser differences to consider? What browser & OS do you use when hanging around at StackOverflow?! – John Slegers Mar 20 '16 at 19:19
  • Chrome on Linux – Tiny Giant Mar 20 '16 at 22:17
  • @TinyGiant : That's odd. I'm using Linux Ubuntu + Chrome myself. – John Slegers Mar 20 '16 at 23:04
  • 1
    Uh... this may be a silly question, but what is a stack snippet? – Rhayene Mar 21 '16 at 13:23
  • @Rhayene : If you look at my question, you see four code samples. Two of them are "runnable". Such "runnable" code samples are known as either Stack Snippets or Code Snippets. – John Slegers Mar 21 '16 at 14:34
  • @JohnSlegers how did you do it? did you include some magic keyword that differs from a normal codeblock? or did you create it in an extra editing box I just didn't find until now? – Rhayene Mar 21 '16 at 14:53
  • 1
    @Rhayene see here – Tiny Giant Mar 21 '16 at 15:07
  • @Tiny Giant this is what I was searching for (when searchin for stack snippet I got lots of stuff talking about those snippets) thank you very much. Is there a reason this is not included in the (advanced) help displayed at the (answer) text box? – Rhayene Mar 21 '16 at 15:16
  • 1
    @AlexanderO'Mara Have you tried this with Python? :) – Lucero Mar 21 '16 at 21:38
  • @Lucero You just need to transpile it first. It's tough keeping the indentation straight though, I recommend editing with a hex editor. :) – Alexander O'Mara Mar 21 '16 at 21:42
1

This is something that has been a problem in Java for a long time, in what was more or less the official guidelines at the time:

Four spaces should be used as the unit of indentation. The exact construction of the indentation (spaces vs. tabs) is unspecified. Tabs must be set exactly every 8 spaces (not 4).

(Of course, the page now says: "This page is not being actively maintained. Links within the documentation may not work and the information itself may no longer be valid. The last revision to this document was made on April 20, 1999", but its legacy remains.)

It must have been an oversight at the time (and it may have been conditioned by the settings the authors were using on their favourite editor), but it's quite clear that having 1 tab being equivalent to two units of indentations means that you're bound to have to use spaces even when you choose to use tabs as your main indentation mechanism. Since the general expectation, when using tabs, is to use 1 tab as 1 level of indentation, this causes problems obviously.

As far as I'm aware, there is no updated version of this document.

In principle, it's actually quite good to have such a document, to be able to harmonise coding guidelines between IDEs. Eclipse, for example, has a "Java Conventions" coding style, which should theoretically be usable within other editors. It even has a "Spaces Only" Tab Policy.

As a consequence, trying to fix indentations that mix tabs with spaces is a nightmare and often involves having to replace every single tab with 4 spaces.

I used to think that tabs where the best and most logical way to indent and that it was just a matter of taste. Unfortunately, with experience, I've learnt that it's not, and that you should always use spaces, for the reasons you've just mentioned: you can try to fix it is as many editors as you want, there's always going to be one that behaves differently.

Note that the Python guidelines clearly use 4 spaces without tabs. As far as I can tell, Ruby tends to use 2 spaces, but I'm not sure whether there is any official guideline.

I'm not aware of any "official" JavaScript guidelines either, but Douglas Crockford's advice is quite sound:

Tabs and spaces should not be mixed. We should pick just one in order to avoid the problems that come from having both. Personal preference is an extremely unreliable criteria. Neither the tab nor the space offers a powerful advantage over the other. Fifty years ago, tab had the advantage of consuming less memory, but Moore's Law has eliminated that advantage. Space has one clear advantage over tab: there is still no reliable standard for how many spaces a tab represents, but it is universally accepted that a space occupies a space. So always use spaces. You can edit with tabs if you must, but make sure it is spaces again before you commit. Maybe someday we will finally get a universal standard for tabs, but until that day comes, the better choice is spaces.


In short, there is indeed something inconsistent between Stack Overflow and Stack Snippets in this respect, and it should probably be fixed for consistency, but the root cause is about using tabs at all: you should avoid them whenever possible.

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