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While I had some success in the past with more fundamental Android questions, I've found that the questions I've asked lately have either received:

  • No answers, or
  • Links to vaguely related SO threads

In my latest question, I included a description of the problem, a GitHub link to the project, a video of the application running, the java code and the log output yet I received no responses. Out of desperation I put a Bounty on this question.

Link: Avoiding manually handling configuration changes

Would SO users please give me some constructive criticism of my latest question so I can edit it in a way that attracts answers? If you are going to down-vote, please justify it in the comments. Thank you.

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    I don't know anything at all about Android, so maybe it is absolutely necessary, but my first impression looking at that question is ohmygod that's a lot of code! Do consider creating a minimal example that reproduces your problem. It makes it much more likely that you'll get a fast answer to your question. With that much code to scrutinize, a bounty is about the only way you'll motivate people enough to take the time to answer. – Cody Gray Mar 16 '16 at 5:23
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    @CodyGray - Flagging your comment as should be an answer :P – TheLostMind Mar 16 '16 at 5:50
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    In addition to the good points already made, your bounty still have 7 days left. As it gets closer to the end, it will get closer to the first bounty page. Plus, some questions take some time to answer. – Alexander O'Mara Mar 16 '16 at 6:01
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    I feel like an answer to this question should come from someone who has at least held an Android phone once in their life. I intentionally chose to post a comment, not an answer, because I think a good answer to this type of constructive inquiry should be based on more than just gut instinct. Someone more familiar with the Android platform would be able to give advice that goes beyond the superficial. I have no idea if too much code is really the only thing wrong with the question. (I don't much care for the attitude that it is "wrong" to post useful information in comments, either.) – Cody Gray Mar 16 '16 at 7:11
  • I personally don't much care for down-voting without an explanation. – Luke Allison Mar 16 '16 at 7:24
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    I'm on the Android tag all the time. Something with that much code I'm just going to ignore- I'm not going to take the time to read it all. – Gabe Sechan Mar 16 '16 at 7:31
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    And without reading all that code, your answer- 99% of all major Android apps I've ever read or worked on, including most of Googles apps and Facebook manually handle orientation changes. The automatic handling of it was a really bad idea by Google that its too late to get rid of. – Gabe Sechan Mar 16 '16 at 7:33
  • Ironically, the original question didn't contain the code, just a link to GitHub as I had the same opinion as you. Then I was asked numerous times for the code. – Luke Allison Mar 16 '16 at 7:33
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    With no code you might have fallen under "primarily opinion based" as "best way to handle orientation configuration changes" is definitely a highly opinionated subject. But a smaller example app would have gotten looked at more readily. The Android tag has bad quality issues with questions, we get a lot of people posting their entire app and saying "it crashes, fix it". – Gabe Sechan Mar 16 '16 at 7:36
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    @GabeSechan this seems to be a dividing issue. I read that one should override this as only a last resort. Btw. I'm probably getting a bit too defensive given I asked for criticism but did I make it clear enough that my app actually works? I'd appreciate if you shared your opinion about automatic handling on my question as it could start a useful discussion. – Luke Allison Mar 16 '16 at 7:38
  • I also believe that there would be too much confusion if I didn't provide context by including the whole application. Disagree? – Luke Allison Mar 16 '16 at 7:40
  • @LukeAllison It is. I'm a big propronent of the opposite opinion (the feature is broken, kill it with fire). Mainly because a lot of the complication of Android apps like Loaders and issues with async tasks updating the wrong UI and the like go away if you get rid of configuration causing Activity recreation. I'm just of the opinion that reloading the UI manually is simpler than solving all the other issues correctly. – Gabe Sechan Mar 16 '16 at 7:44
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    @LukeAllison Too much code is almost as bad as no code. There is way too much code there, and I also gave up on reading it. Provide minimal code that exhibits issue not all of it. And don't put link to your complete project on top of the question. – Her Majesty Queen of ARC Mar 16 '16 at 10:03
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    @LukeAllison Context is not always important. You can explain why you do want or don't want to use some feature and that you are asking solution that does not include that feature. There is no need for us to see your whole application. – Her Majesty Queen of ARC Mar 16 '16 at 10:05
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    @LukeAllison I think you have misunderstood the need for code. External links to code projects are not welcomed at SO. You can add link to complete project as addition (don't post it on top) but questions seeking debugging help, or like in your case solution to a problem must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example – Her Majesty Queen of ARC Mar 16 '16 at 13:54
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I think you have misunderstood the need for code and amount of code needed.

Too much code is almost as bad as no code at all. Also, external links to code projects are not welcomed at SO. You can add link to complete project as addition (don't post it on top) but questions seeking debugging help, or like in your case solution to a problem must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers.

See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example

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It appears to me as though you've included a lot of code in the question that won't have anything at all to do with the actual problem you're facing, (Constraints.Java could probably be inferred from its usages, ToString methods, etc.), and it could be condensed dramatically by removing comments that don't add relevance in your code.

Maybe it's personal opinion too, but I always find it better when there's a single line with a question included in a post that states exactly what problem you're trying to solve.

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