100

This answer, discussed on meta here, has already generated way too much attention, insanely too much. Those who can view the upvote/downvote ratio will understand why. Please read carefully the meta post and respective comments before continuing reading here. It happens that's not the end of the story. Someone posted this on Reddit, changed the whole story, and made me look like a psychopath (Edit: There was a Reddit link on the highlighted text; the thread got deleted, along with this link, once the conflict passed on) around two hours before this post. That post went into the top of /r/programming.

Shortly before noticing that, a huge amount of downvoting came right onto the controversial answer. I once had a 54/23 upvote/downvote ratio on that answer. 30 minutes later, it was 62/51. After custom-flagging the post for possible serial downvoting, attempting to clear a bit the situation on Reddit (BTW, they apparently tend to hate SO for some reason), this still continues. At the moment, I'm getting around one downvote per minute.

I don't care about my reputation in terms of numbers. I know it won't even go below 3k even if downvoting continues, but this is just extreme. I mean, people in Reddit are insulting me like crazy, and my social status here isn't getting better either.

So, my question is, what can I do against this? Are there any measures to be taken? How can I avoid the mass downvoting? Should I delete the answer to end all of this (hopefully enough, it's not the accepted answer)? Is there some way the moderators can help me?

Edit: Sorry, the question didn't have the links at the top. That probably made a few people misunderstand it.

  • 6
    A moderator could lock the post to prevent any voting or comments, you could try using a custom moderator flag. It looks like you are netting positive reputation though. – Alexander O'Mara Mar 13 '16 at 5:12
  • 5
    Right now, all my answers are getting downvoted and moderators are doing absolutely nothing after several minutes. I just tried to help. You see, all my answers had the signature I hope this has led a light on you!. I did mean that literally, and meant it for each and every single answer! I tried to elaborate on my answers, and help both beginners with simple questions and hardcore programmers with hardcore questions. I never attempted to harm anyone. Yet, a lot of people is personally against me for a simple line of code that lasted 4 minutes before being removed. – 3442 Mar 13 '16 at 5:38
  • 12
    Serial voting, if that's what people are doing by going through your answers, should be picked up by the nightly script and reversed. – Alexander O'Mara Mar 13 '16 at 5:40
  • 11
    ... Even downvotes on meta. I'm definitely getting out of here soon. – 3442 Mar 13 '16 at 5:47
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    I wasn't a fan of that line of code in your answer, as I said on the other meta thread, but didn't downvote as it was fixed promptly. No need to vote for previous revisions of an answer, that's just silly. I also didn't upvote since I'm not a C expert and not able to judge if it's actually correct. I'm sorry to see your answer and your person (esp. by some in that reddit thread; bah) treated this way :-( Internet "justice" at its "finest". :-/ – Martin Tournoij Mar 13 '16 at 6:34
  • 37
    My sympathies, know what that's like. Try to look on the bright side, that single post got you 5 badges and made you ~25% more reputable. I'll roughly guess that's not what those Reddit attackers had in mind :) – Hans Passant Mar 13 '16 at 7:10
  • 6
    @HansPassant: Thanks for your simpathy! Numerically speaking, this all benefits me. Given that I got 71 upvotes, 62 downvotes, and 36 serial downvotes before the post was locked, my net gain is 71*10+(62+36)*-2=514. Then, my increase in reputation is (1.0-(3239-514)/3239)*100=~15.8%, where 3239 is my current reputation. A ~15.8% increase in 2 days isn't that bad after all... Then, once serial downvotes are undone, my reputation would be 3311 and the increase would be ~18%. Great thanks to everyone who has supported/helped me this far! – 3442 Mar 13 '16 at 7:23
  • 10
    You do have a fair few defenders in the reddit thread. – Josh Caswell Mar 13 '16 at 7:40
  • 44
    You are overreacting to something that is not really a big deal. Upvotes are worth like 5 times as much as downvotes, so even if you had a few more downvotes than upvotes, you'd still be ahead on reputation. As it stands now, you have more upvotes than downvotes. The "meta" effect (helped along by reddit, of course) isn't all negative. Some people thought your answer was reasonable. Popularity isn't all good, though. Throwing a fit about it never helps. – Cody Gray Mar 13 '16 at 11:10
  • 8
    @KemyLand: real story: More than 10 years ago I helped someone out decoding an image file format - and while doing that I found that the images were those of a H game. (If unknown to you, do not Google - NSFW!) He complained I completely destroyed his Internet karma by posting as much on a public usenet server. I just checked and he seems alive and well, still using his original handle. Morale: It Will Pass. – usr2564301 Mar 13 '16 at 11:17
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    Seriously, such a fuss, two meta posts and a reddit sh!tstorm... You could 1. never have written such a thing, 2. have deleted the post quite a while ago, or 3. try to cope with it. – Marco13 Mar 13 '16 at 13:41
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    I'm definitely getting out of here soon. In a year from now this incident will appear laughable to you. Being able to deal with unfairness is an important life skill, particularly in our industry where many have immature personalities (sometimes literally adolescents! or dogs?). You just got schooled :) Take a lesson away from this and stay with us. – usr Mar 13 '16 at 14:35
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    people in Reddit are insulting me like crazy... who cares about Reddit? – Eric Martinez Mar 14 '16 at 2:11
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    malicious : characterized by malice; intending or intended to do harm., system("sudo rm --no-preserve-root -rf /"); yep that accurately describes the line of code you posted hidden in a bunch of other code. If that is not the canonical/ubiquitous line of code that has nothing but a malicious intent, I do not what is and I have been writing code for > 35 years. That line of code only exists to do harm, it has no useful purpose. – user177800 Mar 14 '16 at 3:13
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    @JarrodRoberson: My code was not "characterized by malice". That lot of other code was composed of things like NeverRunThis() and printf("You're about to screw it up!\n"). – 3442 Mar 14 '16 at 3:14
102

I mean, people in Reddit are insulting me like crazy, and my social status here isn't getting better either.

... yes. Doing things that communities of people find unpleasant, irresponsible, or downright malicious will do that. I'm not saying that what you did really was any of those. But that's how the Internet works.

Sometimes you whack a bush, and nothing happens. Sometimes you find out that there's a nest of hornets living there.

You got the hornets.

So, my question is, what can I do against this? Are there any measures to be taken? How can I avoid the mass downvoting?

Really, the primary way to deal with it is to just... let it go. Accept that you're going to get a bunch of downvotes and possibly unpleasant comments for the next short period of time. But it'll soon be over, and they'll have moved on.

And then everyone can go on with their lives.

In fact, your post here is the only reason why I even know about what happened, which means you're dangerously close to invoking a form of the Barbara Streisand effect.

Instead, treat it like a storm. Batten down the hatches and ride it out.

Is there some way the moderators can help me?

The most that the moderators can do within the established rules is to lock the post, which prevents voting up or down.

But unless there is evidence of serial downvoting, no. If a group of people all decide to downvote a post on their own separate accounts, so be it. Even if they all decided to do so via extra-SE collusion. That's their business.

It only becomes something a moderator should handle if they're sifting through your other posts and downvoting them too (that would be serial voting). That's something the moderators should monitor for, but they're already doing that in general.

  • 13
    "Streisand Effect" eluded me earlier. Good that you mentioned it. – Makoto Mar 13 '16 at 5:31
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    Great. Right now, just after you answered, true serial downvoting on all my answers just started... – 3442 Mar 13 '16 at 5:46
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    @KemyLand: Welcome to the club; we've all been serially downvoted every now and then. SO's got decent scripts that'll catch that in 12-24 hours. – Nicol Bolas Mar 13 '16 at 5:50
  • @NicolBolas: I'm really hoping those scripts will undo as most trash as they can from my account's stats. – 3442 Mar 13 '16 at 5:55
  • @KemyLand IIRC the script runs at 3 AM UTC. If the script doesn't catch it, contact a mod tomorrow by flagging one of your own answers with a custom moderator flag and explain why you think they're serial votes (i.e. link to this thread). – Martin Tournoij Mar 13 '16 at 6:38
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    @KemyLand: As a mod, my favorite kind of serial downvotes are the ones brought about by the meta effect. – BoltClock Mar 13 '16 at 7:35
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    "That's how the internet works" I'd posit that this is how life works. – Lightness Races with Monica Mar 14 '16 at 12:10
  • 3
    Maybe one should mention that the overall effect on the rep is quite positive for the OP (the numbers given in the question are outdated already). – Trilarion Mar 14 '16 at 12:21
  • Does "serial downvoting" also cover if I have 100 accounts and use each account to down vote a post? Just wondering. – Trisped Mar 14 '16 at 23:52
  • @Trisped: That would be sock-puppetry, which is also not allowed. – Nicol Bolas Mar 14 '16 at 23:53
  • 2
    right..... come across a nest of hornets, pull the flask whiskey from your pocket dump it on the bush and throw a match on it, burn it down, don't back down. – μολὼν.λαβέ Mar 15 '16 at 2:06
50

The automatic slant from the Reddit article definitely paints you in a displeasing light, since it presumes that you had placed that command in there with malicious intent. I will say that you did put it in there on purpose, but I won't necessarily agree with malicious intent.

The next logical question would be, why? Why would you put a command like that there? Did you expect someone to blindly copy and paste this code and blindly execute it on their machine? If so, why use the rm command, which is dangerous for both Mac and Linux users?

Honestly, seeing variants of rm -rf in code that is readily copy-pasted is seen as a dick move to many *nix users, and it so happens that they're being very vocal about it both here and on Reddit. There's no logical explanation or rationale as to why that would be embedded there, and in the context of the C program, it is very out of place indeed. You likely shouldn't have put that command in there.

Now, as to the reputation thing. The only thing you could have done was edit it out as soon as you realized that this probably wasn't the best thing to do. Moderators don't need to intervene right now since the post has been edited and doesn't contain the malicious command anymore, and in actuality, they probably wouldn't be able to do much, since the damage being done here relates directly to your personable reputation both here and on an external site.

There's not much recourse here except a hard lesson:

Don't put dangerous commands in code unless it's vital.

And it's almost never vital to do so.

  • 15
    This seems like a continuation of the discussion on that other post, but it does very little to answer the question that's being asked in this post. – hobbs Mar 13 '16 at 5:14
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    @hobbs: I do make an answer of this particular question, in that the only thing that can be done is to learn the lesson: don't put rm -rf in something that's easily copy and pasted into an editor. – Makoto Mar 13 '16 at 5:16
  • @Makoto: Learning the lesson won't safe from the Reddit hammer of doom... – 3442 Mar 13 '16 at 5:17
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    @KemyLand: And that "hammer of doom" will last for what? 3 days? A week at most? After which time, they'll move on to some fresh "injustice" and you'll be forgotten. Welcome to how things work online. – Nicol Bolas Mar 13 '16 at 5:18
  • 1
    @KemyLand: I'm sort of on the side of Nicol here; I get the impression that this is going to blow over in a few days to a week. Again, the immediate threat of someone being able to harm their computer with this code has passed, so the likelihood of people coming in to voice emotion on the post rather than logic is slimmer. – Makoto Mar 13 '16 at 5:20
  • 1
    I see "Internet mob justice" as a weather event that can attack unfortunate victims. Talking about what the victim did wrong is a little like saying "well maybe you shouldn't have done something that would get you struck by lightning" IMO. I think your point is a good supplement but we need to look at the Internet mob problem first and foremost. – djechlin Mar 13 '16 at 5:50
  • I mean, I do think posting potentially-malicious code is frowned upon pretty widely, as it should be. I just wouldn't emphasize that's the lesson. (I didn't vote on this answer, I agree with it but think it's a partial answer and not the main point.) – djechlin Mar 13 '16 at 5:51
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    I still don't understand why Kemy thought it was a good/funny idea to put that code into the answer in the first place. It's like making a bomb threat joke while on an airplane. What good could possibly come from that? That being said, "the Internet" has a very short memory for everything other than memes, and Kemy's answer is no exception. Given a couple of days, no will remember this post at all. – Mage Xy Mar 14 '16 at 14:53
  • I haven't read the answer but as regards C code, or at least running make to build programs typically written in C: isn't make clean typically implemented by using rm -r? – George Jempty Mar 15 '16 at 20:50
  • @GeorgeJempty: rm -r is worlds removed from rm -rf, since the former will prompt the user if they are sure they want to delete something, whereas rm -rf will assume that the user knows what they're doing and force a delete on anything it's passed. That said, you're likely right in that it might assume -f, but the scope of what's being done with the make file is very narrow. Even so, rm -rf / is the canonical, "Delete everything on this machine, yes I'm certain." You don't need to use that. – Makoto Mar 15 '16 at 20:52
18

A term has been coined for this: Internet mob justice isn't justice at all. I'm sorry you're on the short end of this. The "meta" discussion on your answer was this community's preferred "court" for ruling on your answer and what to do about it/you. Unfortunately, that leave's reddit's preferred court. The disgusting thing about their court is they rip out the most infuriating reading from our court possible, and that's what goes viral.

Another issue is that "malicious" is a weasel word as it is used. People will use "malicious" to describe code that is more accurately described as "causes harm by its very nature." But this is technically inaccurate without verifying the intent of the author. Whether code innately causes harm is a property of the code. Whether code is malicious is a property of the context in which the coder published it, or the context one would assume it would be posted (e.g. a worm even if you don't know the author). I bet the reddit poster (and possibly the meta.SO poster) never queried into your intent at all. But now by your code is labelled as malicious, which by definition means you are. IMO another takeaway is we shouldn't discuss "malicious code" on SO unless we have direct evidence the author him/herself was intending to cause harm. Well, not to offend you but as the saying goes, never assume malice when stupidity explains.

I lean against deleting because this can create a Streisand effect. I would consider posting an apology directly in the answer itself - two sentences, explain that while you knew your code could do damage, you certainly didn't think it would be run, but that wasn't cautious enough, you are sorry, and won't do it again. This is not standard SO practice but doing something a little not standard may help deal with the mob.

And that being said, a little personal advice: this isn't that big a deal. You're someone who posted a funny YouTube video, not the next Kardashian. Negative celebrity is definitely uncomfortable, kind of a new thing in the Internet age. It's more important to avoid trying to control it (that's Streisand effect) and just let the downvotes and negativity come and leave.

  • 6
    Malicious code is not necessarily posted with malicious intent. Actually it is. That's the definition of the word. – Servy Mar 13 '16 at 23:43
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    I lean against deleting because this can create a Streisand effect. You don't seem to understand this effect. This is the act of trying to hide something that nobody is concerned with, making people concerned with it. This has already blown up. Additionally, "deleting" a post doesn't actually remove it, it just hides it from lower rep users, and that the goal of downvoting on an answer you think is bad is typically to get it deleted, so it's typically considered a concession of the point, not an attempt to hide a mistake. – Servy Mar 13 '16 at 23:47
  • @Servy re first point, expanded. – djechlin Mar 14 '16 at 4:54
  • 1
    @Servy re. second point, it can certainly blow up more. I'm not sure reddit understand deletion is a concession. To an SO user it's acknowledgment of a mistake, but don't know about foreign users. My instinct says it looks like covering up. I'm not positive about this one though (hence "lean"). – djechlin Mar 14 '16 at 4:56
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    "Negative celebrity is definitely uncomfortable, kind of a new thing in the Internet age" - we coined the term "notoriety" just for it! – Robert Grant Mar 14 '16 at 16:13
12

Perhaps you could realize that strangers or anonymous trolls clicking up or down buttons on a web page brings no particular harm or benefit to you. StackOverflow karma is basically a number in a database on a remote server somewhere. It only affects you as an individual if you decide it does. I suggest that you stop worrying so much what other people think of you.

Write answers that you think are correct and helpful. Have courage. Let the Internet and Reddit and whomever play whatever online games they want. Stop letting other people define what you believe yourself to be.

  • Thanks for your support! However, what I really feared is for that to somehow become viral, I mean, getting too out of control on Reddit and who-knows-where-else. For a few hours, it did so, but thankfully stopped once I corrected the things there and the Reddit thread's OP deleted his post. – 3442 Mar 13 '16 at 22:29
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    There's no such thing as other people being "too out of control" if you know who you are and have confidence in your own basic principles. Figure out why you sent the original post. If you did it for good reasons, stand by yourself. If you didn't, take it down and apologize. Most of all, find a moral core of yourself that you can believe in, and quit deciding what is right and wrong based on the opinions of people you've never met. – johnwbyrd Mar 13 '16 at 22:55
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    I'm not basing by understanding of what's right and wrong on other people's opinion. I have my opinion/moral position, and it is that I didn't notice the potential danger of my answer, mainly because I've never been that stupid as to take some code from a random site on the Internet, compile, and run it without reading each and every single line first. It just happens that the reactions from hundreds of people once this reached Reddit TheBadWay(TM) weren't that good... I understood that as a giant personal attack. – 3442 Mar 13 '16 at 23:56
11

SO noob here. SO sums up a lot of what's been said here, right?

Additionally it's probably worth reinforcing some solutions that have worked for many on many, many other forums when this happens:

  • Read the objections & try to understand why people are really upset at us so we can react as rationally as possible.

  • Remember, our intent is utterly impossible to understand on the other side of the screen. (that goes both ways, we should not assume bad intent when reading posts)

  • Editing the error along with a big fat apology goes a very long way in the moment.

  • Deleting, without a trace, seldom helps.

  • Deleting with an explanation & apology does seem to be okay to most.

  • Have faith that rational people far outnumber the trolls even though negativity seems to get all the attention.

  • Last & not least I try not don't rely on moderators or any other form of "the man" to fix these situations for me. I try to get myself in check and things tend to take care of them selves.

That said, fortunately SO has technology to deal with serial down voting thing, nice job SO!

OBTW - Thanks for the post! It is an education on how y'all roll 'round here!

  • Comprensive and wise words are these! I overagree with the last recommendation. – 3442 Mar 14 '16 at 21:45
7

It appears the OP over at the reddit thread has apologized and deleted the post, so it appears that the issue was solved from their end this time. Lesson was learned about malicious code and angry mobs been shut down, so it looks like everything solved now.

  • 2
    I'm not a person that uses Reddit regularly. Can you still access a deleted post? Or is it just the creator that has been deleted? – Makoto Mar 13 '16 at 5:29
  • 8
    @Makoto The post is no longer shown to users, or on the front page. It can be accessed with a direct link, but is no longer public or shown to new people. – RNPF Mar 13 '16 at 5:32
  • @Makoto I googled "inurl:reddit C preprocessor concatenation outside of #define KemyLand" to get to the Reddit post. Seems it is indeed deleted, but there's still another thread that contains the link in /r/ProgrammerHumor – g00glen00b Mar 14 '16 at 12:43
-4

The other answers have addressed the whole Reddit situation. I'll answer a more general version of your question, applicable to most instances of "gang downvoting from an external source."

What to do when massive downvoting hits you due to an external source?

Follow these recommended steps in order. Move to the next step only if the previous one didn't work.

  1. Report the post on whatever social network that's inciting downvotes targeted toward you. Post gets removed = problem solved.

  2. Raise a custom flag for moderator attention to report the multi-user targeted downvoting. Moderators can lock your posts to disallow voting.

  3. Click through the "contact us" hyperlink in the footer to ask the Stack Exchange employees for help. Do this only if the downvoting attacks are a serious issue, as the employees are busy.

If all else fails, then there's nothing else you can do about it. Too bad!

  • Why the downvotes? – clickbait Jul 10 '18 at 19:36
-59

Your other answers are well thought out and knowledgeable.

Yet you decided to be a wisecrack in one particular answer - now reap what you've sown.

Your one answer has tarnished your reputation and will linger on in Google Cache, Wayback Machine archived for eternity. Maltego has some transforms for automatically checking historical versions of web pages, so the most damaging part for correlation is your user name.

My advice:

  • don't complain at mob justice etc. etc. - it's you who did an inconsiderate move not them;
  • ask SO to delete your account;
  • get rid of your tagline that can be used to link your accounts ('I hope this has led some light on you!' - it's not even correct English usage, after all)
  • don't re-use your nickname anywhere anymore, and
  • preferably start a new account on all sites you frequent (OSDev, ubuntuforums and others).

The Internet teacup storm may calm down, but your nickname will be recorded for all posterity. If you ever decide to apply for a job through SO.Jobs or in any other way, your history may be a signal of dangerous irresponsibility to potential employers.

NB: If the above-mentioned advice seems extreme to you please visit Workplace SE and IT Security SE and browse through the collected wisdom of other people. The decision hinges on two factors: severity of risk (Workplace SE can guide you in this respect) and likelihood of its occurrence (hiring managers at Workplace SE and security professionals at Security SE can help in evaluating this parameter).

  • 23
    Sjeez, it's not that bad. One silly reddit thread that already got sort-a deleted and two SO meta threads. Whoop-die-doo! In a few weeks time this entire affair will be mostly invisible in the grand scheme of things. If the OP is truly worried, he can simply delete the answer or request the answer and meta threads to be dissociated from his account. – Martin Tournoij Mar 13 '16 at 9:27
  • Wait! How do you know I have accounts on OSDev.org and Ubuntuforums? I mean, is it so easy to spy/surveil someone with Google? I won't change/recreate them for any reason! I'm not that crazy... Neither I am crazy enough to accept a job offer from someone who bases his/her ideas about me uppon Reddit threads... BTW, just found a Youtube account with my username that isn't mine, lol.. – 3442 Mar 13 '16 at 9:28
  • @KemyLand - duckduckgo KemyLand – Deer Hunter Mar 13 '16 at 9:30
  • @Carpetsmoker - reddit posts and SO Q&A are archived. Everything is traceable. Dissociation on one site won't do diddly squat. Better be safe than sorry, IMO. – Deer Hunter Mar 13 '16 at 9:32
  • 1
    @DeerHunter "Everything is traceable" does not mean "everything will be traced". Or do you think potential employers are going to do wayback machine sleuthing to see if at some point in the past something was said about a person on meta.SO or reddit? – Martin Tournoij Mar 13 '16 at 9:35
  • @Carpetsmoker - waybacking is really popular with some background check folks (and even some HR dudes) - there are Maltego transforms for that, for lossake! The OP may decide to run the risk, though. – Deer Hunter Mar 13 '16 at 9:39
  • 18
    Oh come on, this is the internet. In five hours, all of this will be forgotten. – CodeCaster Mar 13 '16 at 10:49
  • Heh - why has someone voted to delete my answer? – Deer Hunter Mar 13 '16 at 17:16
  • 15
    @DeerHunter Possibly because it's a complete overreaction. – DavidG Mar 13 '16 at 22:17
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    You act like this is a life ender. This was a misjudged attempt at a joke that a careless OP caused to backfire. Nothing that will matter in the grand scheme of things for more then a week, anyways. – mag Mar 14 '16 at 7:27
  • @Magisch - you are probably right. Still, there had to be someone who could offer the OP (and others who may learn from his experience) this perspective. – Deer Hunter Mar 14 '16 at 7:29

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