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This question already has an answer here:

After looking at this question for a few minutes, along with its respective votes, comments, and edits, all of this got me thinking a bit, if maybe we're getting to aggressive into identifying so-called "homework questions", which, according to several sources, such as this one, that one, and the other one, aren't by themselves bad questions, or questions meriting downvoting+flagging+close votes combos.

Anyway, that's not the case here. Let me explain it a bit more. If you look at the question's edit history, buried at the bottom is the original post, right? Well, it turns out that such a post contained two misleading sentences:

  • It would be really helpful if both recursion and iterative solutions are provided.: This sentence clearly looks like a homework-style requirement, and so was the question though to be so.
  • ...such that the digit in the n'th is never greater than the n'th digit of the given number.: This sentence was unintelligible, and so was the question though to be poorly/lazyly written, if not copy-pasted.

Then, after about 11 minutes after the original post, the second comment stated: Stack overflow is not a homework or a literal 'free'lancer service. Don't ask people to do the work for you., and as a result, the question immediately got two downvotes. This is my first point. As soon as someone comments that SO is not for homework, downvotes, flags, and what-not come in.

The OP then proceeded to clarify all of this, and to state that English is not his first language. He said that the first sentence's intention was for him to learn about recursive and iterative styles, and so the first conflicting sentence was to be interpreted as "I would like to practice recursion and iterative styles, and so it would be helpful if an answer could provide examples relating to this proper problem". The second sentence was apparently kind of a typo/translation error, and not any sort of copy-paste. After editing both sentences, and asking for reconsidering the votes, the question was fortunately upvoted twice.

The OP also clarified that it was not a homework/job assignment, but rather something for himself to practice and learn. He reiterated this with by adding a message at the top of the question to avoid further issues.

This is definitely not the first time I have seen this kind of situations. However, I am unable to find those previous examples. So, how should questions be considered to be "homework", and what should be the behavior towards non-perfect-English posts?

Just because of two misleading sentences, the community reacted in a harsh way, and it happened not to even be a homework question in the first place. Is this the way we're supposed to behave?

marked as duplicate by Cody Gray, HaveNoDisplayName, Luke, John Conde, Toto Mar 13 '16 at 17:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    "...as a result, the question immediately got two downvotes"...You have no way of knowing if that is true. It may be but since votes are anonymous you have no evidence. of that statement. – Paulie_D Mar 13 '16 at 0:39
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    "Often times, a downvote really should be a vote to close, not a downvote." Now that I agree with. I often Close Vote without Down Voting...a question might be clear, and well researched but still off-topic. – Paulie_D Mar 13 '16 at 0:45
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    "Knowledge" and fact are not necessarily the same. The world used to be flat you know. – Paulie_D Mar 13 '16 at 0:56
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    Question in current state shows some code, but it is not clear if code is in any way related to the question and what, if any issues are present in the code. And there is no question... – Alexei Levenkov Mar 13 '16 at 0:57
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    @Ravi: I'm always puzzled what posters of such questions want to achieve by stating essentially "I want to learn, solve this problem for me". Care to explain what are you looking for? – Alexei Levenkov Mar 13 '16 at 0:59
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    @KemyLand this is clearly "homework" question from SO point of view - something one need to solve that has no practical usage beyond gaining particular knowledge (like for loop or other single concept) which not necessary given by some teacher (could be self-imposed, some competition, interview question). – Alexei Levenkov Mar 13 '16 at 1:02
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    I did look carefully at this question and decided to just ignore it. Unusually, this is a question I did not down or close-vote. I do notice here, however 'it happened not to even be a homework question in the first place'. I would like to know how you know that? Do you know the question poster? Are you on the same course and know that no such assignments have been issued? – Martin James Mar 13 '16 at 1:46
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    @MartinJames: Of course, everything we know is from the OP's words. Basing upon there, and the fact that so far he has been open to editing/removing faulty sentences, I wouldn't expect it to be homework in any sense of the word, neither do I think it may be. – 3442 Mar 13 '16 at 1:50
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    You see, the problem I have with such statements, and phrases like 'false positives', is that I see no justification for them apart from the OP's statements in the question and comments. Since some OP's are blatant liars who will post whatever it takes to get a homework answer written for them, OP 'it's not homework' statements/comments are irrelevant. – Martin James Mar 13 '16 at 1:51
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    Never underestimate the desire of students to get all their work done for them! I still have no position on the OP, and will continue to ignore it and apply no votes, but I am somewhat dismayed that whatever the OP posts seems to be swallowed by many SO contributors hook, line and sinker. – Martin James Mar 13 '16 at 1:54
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    'Simple trusting' will get you abused on SO. I'm afraid that many posters don't give a toss about you, or how much time they suck away from answering better questions. All they care about is getting their work done by someone else for free, and thye don't care what they need to say to achieve that aim. – Martin James Mar 13 '16 at 1:58
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    Ravi needs to learn to use a debugger. Step through code. See why the output is occurring as it happens. There are a few valid reasons to downvote and close this question. It just depends who stumbles upon it and how generous with their time Ravi gets. Like a free 30 minutes. Maybe 2 hours. Depending on his skill level. – Drew Mar 13 '16 at 2:02
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    OK, IIRC, the question was originally somewhat unclear, Now it's had 11 edits, it's somewhat clearer. While I could not downvote it as a no-effort homework dump, I can close vote it for no aparrent debugging done. – Martin James Mar 13 '16 at 2:10
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    @Ravi: "What right do such people have to down-vote if they are really not providing any help?" Um, no. You do not suddenly gain the right to have your question answered just because you posted it. If someone looks at a poorly worded question and downvotes it, they have no responsibility to monitor that question to see if it becomes better later on. If they leave a comment on it, it is not their responsibility to come back later to see if the post has improved. You are not entitled to help. – Nicol Bolas Mar 13 '16 at 5:39
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    The point of homework or, ahem, a personal exercise is never to get a working program. There is no ticked-off customer behind it that won't pay you when your code doesn't work. Nobody actually cares that the program works, most likely thing that happens next is that it is thrown away. The point is to exercise problem solving. Asking somebody else to solve the problem is completely pointless. The only constructive thing is to ask how to address the problem, fairly doomed to be closed as "too broad" of course. – Hans Passant Mar 13 '16 at 8:36
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homework questions, [...] according to several sources, [...] aren't by themselves bad questions

That's true. The fact that the question is homework doesn't make it a bad question, but an overwhelming majority of homework related questions are bad questions. They're not bad because they're homework, they're bad for other reasons. It's possible to ask a good question about a problem that happens to be homework related, but it's very rare, and not the case with this question.

He said that the first sentence's intention was for him to learn about recursive and iterative styles, and so the first conflicting sentence was to be interpreted as "I would like to practice recursion and iterative styles, and so it would be helpful if an answer could provide examples relating to this proper problem"

And that's not a good question to ask on SO, so it's appropriate for it to be downvoted.

The OP also clarified that it was not a homework/job assignment

As you've already pointed out, this is irrelevant. It's a bad question because it's a bad question, not because it's a homework question.

He reiterated this with by adding a message at the top of the question to avoid further issues.

And this was edited out of the question because, as has already been said, this is irrelevant.

So, how should questions be considered to be "homework"

Whether a question is related to homework or not is irrelivant. Questions should be judged on their merits, which, in this case, is to say that it's a very low quality question that just dumps a bunch of code, says, "It doesn't work" and asks for people to fix it.

and what should be the behavior towards non-perfect-English posts?

If the problems with the language are so bad that the question cannot be understood, close it as "unclear", if the question can be understood despite the language issues, then it should be edited to fix those problems. I should note that the English language problems are not particularly concerning with this question. That's not what makes it bad. It's bad because it just dumps a bunch of code and asks people to fix it, and that isn't a good question, regardless of the quality of the English or whether it's homework or not.

Just because of two misleading sentences, the community reacted in a harsh way, and it happened not to even be a homework question in the first place. Is this the way we're supposed to behave?

I don't even see any indication that those sentences are why the question received a poor reception. It received a poor reception because it's a low quality question.

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The is no evidence at all that the votes on the question have anything to do with the question being a "homework" question.

There exist these two comments that point toward this being homework:

Stack overflow is not a homework or a literal 'free'lancer service. Don't ask people to do the work for you.

... and ...

@Ravi: It would be really helpful if both recursion and iterative solutions are provided.: That looks pretty much like homework...

And the second of those two comments was made by yourself.

The second comment is a far more aggressive "homework" accusation than the first, and if you are personally seeing a problem with the negative reaction that Stack Overflow has to homework questions, then it would probably be a good idea to stop accusing questions of being homework questions.

The first comment is nothing more than an accusation of laziness. The first comment accuses the post of being exactly what the downvote option exists for (per its tooltip):

This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful

And if we look at the original form of the question, or several of the forms of the question up to and after the time that this meta post was opened, that was an absolutely perfect description of the original form of the question.

So much so that I had cast a close vote under the reason of "Unclear what you are asking."

Whether this (or any other question) on the site is homework is completely irrelevant. There is nothing inherently wrong with questions that happen to be based on homework (or office work).

The problem is with questions that are lazy, show no research effort, are unclear, etc. And this question absolutely met those criteria until at least the 8th revision which was made a full 20 minutes after this meta post was opened.

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