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I posted this question earlier today, and a couple of people made comments which suggested how to improve the question in ways that did not contribute to the understandability of the question.

I asked the commentors to make the edits, since both have edit privileges, and I cared less about that aspect of the question than they did.

Was my request reasonable, or do people feel that edits should always be made by the OP when commenters make a reasonable edit suggestion?

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    The changes they are suggesting are really a matter of preference, and don't objectively improve the post. It's fair enough for them to leave a comment, rather than editing immediately. I'd say that the comments were more of a helpful note to you rather than cleaning up the post, though. – Rob Mar 3 '16 at 2:44
  • They seem to feel strongly about it and expressed a strong desire to see it edited. – merlin2011 Mar 3 '16 at 2:48
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    I've been pondering this for a long time - not just with code in questions, but more broadly: what sort of edits are the responsibility of the post owner and not the community? – BoltClock Mar 3 '16 at 3:32
  • @BoltClock I've wondered the same, but ultimately I think that the guidance we give in the help center covers it. If an edit will change the meaning of a question, it is the responsibility of the OP, except in rare border cases. (e.g. Significant generalization of a question to improve its effectiveness as a canonical post.) The community is responsible for any edits that improve the post without changing its meaning. Remembering that the OP is part of the community, though, they share that responsibility. – Mogsdad Mar 3 '16 at 21:13
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    @Mogsdad: Sounds about right. I'm wondering about exceptional cases, too - plagiarism for instance, is almost always the responsibility of the post author (though this has exceptions of its own). – BoltClock Mar 4 '16 at 6:33
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My approach for changing code beyond basic formatting:

Code changes are generally frowned upon and hence comment would be my first step.

Than I would expect OP of the post to react in some way:

  • make an edit themselves - stop here (even if edit is not exactly what I would do)
  • give me permission to make whatever change - make an edit and ping OP with comment similar to "I made a change feel free to revert/improve" (assuming 2K+, code change with less reputation would be way more painful and I'd not recommend unless OP is willing to review it as soon as possible)
  • comment about "keep your ### edits from my post" - stop here. Forget about existence of the post.
  • do nothing after reasonable time - depending on (expected) popularity of the post - either make the edit after 2+ days or move on.

Note that if you are about to make edit to code in question I'd recommend waiting for an answer to be accepted to know what is important to the question and what is not.


About particular post:

For OP: Not much could be done better - you gave explicit permission to edit "feel free to edit". You could have made the edit yourself if you agree with suggestion. Remember that other editors should be concerned to inadvertently change part of the code you are asking about (maybe indirectly). The only thing "Why are you not exercising {edit privileges}?" kind of comment (which may be viewed as personal attack) could be moved to META earlier (also couple back and forth comments first is reasonable).

As for commenters: Trying to teach better manners of posting is risky (I would only do that for first posts) and also have significantly less lasting value than concrete recommendations about the post. Link to better practice/discussion has significantly less chances to start flame. Unless I'm ready to edit post myself I'd made comment primarily addressing readers even if it may not be the most polite toward OP:

"Note to visitors: code in the question does not represent good practice ... and only serves as example of approach. If using the code change ..."

  • Thanks for the feedback! – merlin2011 Mar 3 '16 at 7:41
  • One more note, I think you may have missed my first comment giving permission for the edit. :) – merlin2011 Mar 3 '16 at 22:20
  • @merlin2011 looks like so. I've edited post as you've really done everything I find reasonable - it is call on commenter to edit or let you make a change. – Alexei Levenkov Mar 3 '16 at 22:31
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In this case, given that the proposed edit has no bearing on the issue being asked about, and especially given the stated reason for the change:

@merlin2011: Please keep in mind that questions are not only read by you or me or Mike, but also by beginners who tend to adopt bad habbits [sic] like using wrong type specifiers in format strings. [...]

the proposers should consider themselves responsible for it.

I think it makes sense in general for those who see a tangential issue as important to make the edit. (And I'm not saying it isn't important -- it's a good thought, actually.) That's pretty much the purpose of the editing feature.

(You could also do it yourself, as a friendly concession to your peers' concerns (assuming you consider these people close enough peers)).

It makes sense for them to have commented first, though: there's no edit that won't rub some OP the wrong way.

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    Also, this has nothing to do with rep despite what one of the comments might suggest. Sure I come down hard on users with hundreds of questions and almost no answers (this OP has more answers than questions) who tend to ask low quality questions because they really ought to know the very basics of asking questions, but this isn't about asking basics. – BoltClock Mar 3 '16 at 5:12
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As someone who can edit - I only do so if I'm sure I can do so without making any more than minor cosmetic alteration. I'll fix formatting, spelling, grammar.

I will reflow/indent code if I can without altering it semantically... but that's where I draw the line. If I'm adding something to the code - especially in a question, where I might accidentally 'fix' the very problem they're asking about - I'll steer clear and ask the supplicant to edit.

This appears to be what's happened on this question - edits are suggested that are improvements to the code, and presumably help it in terms of clarity or quality, but go beyond 'cosmetic' alteration.

I'm a little more open to it for answers - if an answer doesn't 'work' and I can see what's needed to make it 'right', then I will alter it. But that's because answers should be "correct", but questions almost by definition aren't.

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What is our policy on editing questions vs asking an OP to edit?

When should I edit posts? directly answers what one should edit. I would add a higher rep user deserves more time before someone else edits. And during that time, a comment is the way to go.


Making a good questions can be hard.

Should it be a missing #include<>, spelllling error, or a minor coding infraction, small defects in a post all serve to obscure its central meaning.

That particular post I saw unfold with the usual initial comments from the usual suspects.

Although I did not concur with the comments' finer points of the post, I can understand why they are there. Also I understand OP's feeling about their tangential nature. OP was not impolite, but was a little edgy.

Yes I think OP should have promptly edited per concerns or politely invited the commentators to self-edit. If anything for a matter of expediency.

Was OP's request "asked the commentators to make the edits" reasonable - yes.

Yet take all with a grain of salt. Neither commentator has posted many questions (I count 2 questions combined on SO) and together have 27 months SO experience - certainly not a high question/experience ratio.

Disclosure: I posted the accepted answer.

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BoltClock's comment resonated with me.

I've been pondering this for a long time - not just with code in questions, but more broadly: what sort of edits are the responsibility of the post owner and not the community? (emphasis mine)

I've wondered the same, but ultimately I think that the guidance we give in the help center covers it:

When should I edit posts?

Any time you see a post that needs improvement and are inclined to suggest an edit, you are welcome to do so. The original author of a question or answer may always edit their own post, regardless of reputation level.

Edits are expected to be substantial and to leave the post better than you found it.

The balance for that power is provided as of the Reject Reasons when reviewing Suggested Edits:

This edit deviates from the original intent of the post. Even edits that must make drastic changes should strive to preserve the goals of the post's owner.

So what does this say about editing responsibility?

I take that to mean that if an edit will change the meaning of a question, it is the responsibility of the OP, except in rare border cases. (e.g. Significant generalization of a question to improve its effectiveness as a canonical post.) On a site with programming questions, code tends to be the core of the question - the clearest expression of intended meaning, which is why so many of us will leave non-superficial code changes to the OP, and will reject suggested edits that don't conform.

On the other hand, the community is responsible for any edits that improve the post without changing its intended meaning. Remembering that the OP is part of the community, though, they share that responsibility, so if you have an opportunity to improve your own post, you should be first in line to do so, as it can only help you get the answer you need.

If you're going to cross the lines of responsibility by changing the intended meaning (read: code), then getting permission to do so is absolutely appropriate. Code changes without prior permission should only be done when community security is affected. (Examples: Clear copyright infringement, malicious code, or code containing sensitive private information.)

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