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Problem: Somebody comes looking for an answer, does some minimal searching, finds potential question, gets overloaded in very thorough (read long) and correct answers, and either gives up and leaves or asks a new (probably duplicate) question.

Duplicate question: How does one create a metaclass?

The possible duplicate had been noted, I took a quick view of it, and decided to provide a short and simple answer. After asking for critiques in the Python room it was suggested I move my answer onto the original question, which I did: https://stackoverflow.com/a/35732111/208880

My question: How/Can we differentiate between the long/thorough answers that are great for deeper understanding, and the shorter/simpler answers that are occasionally needed to get going?

My concern is that even if the OP had found the duplicate answer, s/he would have quit reading, and still be lost, long before getting to my answer.

Oh, and as a personal anecdote, I don't usually read the long answers myself unless I am specifically looking for the deeper understanding. When I have a problem to solve I check the short answers first as I can get through 10-15 of those (and usually find a solution) in the same time as trying to read through and understand a long, detailed, deep answer.

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  • TL;DR The curse of writing good canonicals/duplicates nowadays? – πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 1 '16 at 21:42
  • What's wrong with the number of answers, of which have varying degrees of short/simple, on the dupe target? If you don't want to spend time writing answers someone might not read, SO or answering dupe questions might not be the winningest idea. – user559633 Mar 1 '16 at 21:43
  • @tristan: The short/simple answers come many pages below the appendix-like answers, which, IMO, reduces their discoverability. – Ethan Furman Mar 1 '16 at 21:50
  • Getting overloaded, giving up, leaving and asking a new (probably duplicate) question..not professional programming traits. Doom will descend upon them. – Paulie_D Mar 1 '16 at 23:18
  • @Paulie_D: Well, this is StackOverflow, not Programmers. ;) – Ethan Furman Mar 1 '16 at 23:21
  • Stack Overflow for professional programming issues. Skipping potential answers because they're too long and might be an opportunity to learn....SHAME I SAY, SHAME! :>) – Paulie_D Mar 1 '16 at 23:23
  • "My concern is that even if the OP had found the duplicate answer, s/he would have quit reading, and still be lost, long before getting to my answer." That sounds like their problem, rather than ours. I mean, if you want the information, it is available. If you're too lazy to read it, well then you obviously don't want it very badly. Why should it be our job to cater to the laziest of people? I'd rather have answers that border on too long and too complete; it is much harder to add content that isn't there than it is to skim lengthy content. – Cody Gray Mar 2 '16 at 6:09
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How/Can we differentiate between the long/thorough answers that are great for deeper understanding, and the shorter/simpler answers that are occasionally needed to get going?

You differentiate between them by asking separate questions. I think there are many underlying problems to this specific situation.


The duplicate target itself is quite broad and not very specific. This means that the answers are going to be long by their very nature. While there are some good looking answers, most of them will be very long because of how broad the question is. It's no coincidence that the highest upvoted answer is also over 2700 words long.

The question that was dupe-hammered is not the same as the duplicate target. Compare the two questions: "What is a meta class?" to "how [does one go] about creating one (a meta class)?" They are different questions with different focuses. The former is a broad conceptual question and the latter appears to be concerned with specific syntax.

Long answers can be unhelpful (downvotable) in certain situations. While it is certainly nice to know everything about how something works, it's often overkill. Short, focused answers are immediately helpful. Longer answers might have too much irrelevant or otherwise pedantic information. They are presented at the wrong level of abstraction to be useful. I don't need to know about the quantum mechanics of semiconductors to use an if statement.

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