2

Update:

My flag was marked as "helpful" and the question is closed as too broad (by mod @Matt, who I assume also marked the flag as helpful). Yet the review ban wasn't lifted. Aren't the two supposed to go hand-in-hand? (The question is too broad, so down-voting is an appropriate action...)


Since there is still no actual way of disputing a review, I will post this here.

I failed a review a couple of days ago. I flagged the post for a moderator but 2 days have passed and I have been told that it could take up to 1-2months for a mod to review my flag - which will make it irrelevant.

I downvoted the question, which is why I failed the review. In my opinion, the question was broad and unclear (to me, at least). Also it lacks research and doesn't show any attempt by the OP to solve/show what he tried to solve it. I have to say that I am no expert in C++ but it still struck me as a low quality question upon first seeing it.
I believe that the question has been automatically inserted as an audit simply because it had a lot of upvotes. Also there were no answers to the question at that time (now it has 1-accepted).

I also believe that many people failed/will fail this review. Please reconsider this question as an audit.

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    Sure, being the only SO user to DV a question that was upvoted by 15 other users is a great way to fail an audit. You can engage in a dispute with a machine or those 15 users, it isn't going to accomplish anything. Move on, pay more attention, like the Skip button. – Hans Passant Feb 28 '16 at 10:47
  • Well you actually don't know I was the only user. Because other users might have also DV this through the review queue like myself (also not all SO users saw/read this question to begin with). I usually skip reviews I'm unsure about it just happened that I didn't on this one. A 7-day-ban for this kind of thing seems excessive. Especially when I wish to contribute and review more questions/answers. – Idos Feb 28 '16 at 10:48
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    I do know, I paid attention :) – Hans Passant Feb 28 '16 at 10:49
  • I don't quite get what you're trying to say by that :X (When I click the downvote and failed the audit it doesn't actually downvoted the question..) – Idos Feb 28 '16 at 10:50
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    You can only get a 7 day ban if you've already had a 2 day ban. You were warned, carried on as nothing had happened and therefore the ban length escalated and this time it got your attention. That's why then ban length increases; working as designed. – Robert Longson Feb 28 '16 at 10:50
  • TBH I have also gotten a 30-day-ban in the past. I am well aware of the rules and I pay attention. Mistakes happen to everyone. I didn't dispute any other failed audit I had in the past as I felt they were justified. – Idos Feb 28 '16 at 10:51
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    They do, not frequently enough that you should get escalating bans though. – Robert Longson Feb 28 '16 at 10:52
  • Also not true. I review an enormous amount of question/answers per day (with all the relevant queues that are available). As far as I know there aren't any statistics as to how many audits you can fail per successful ones, so if I fail 1 audit and pass 100 it wouldn't matter... – Idos Feb 28 '16 at 10:54
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    You're doing too much too quickly without sufficient thought then. It's going to get worse for you too as instead of 30 day bans resetting to 2 days it's proposed they will increase instead meta.stackexchange.com/questions/275736/… – Robert Longson Feb 28 '16 at 10:56
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I downvoted the question, which is why I failed the review.

I'm sort of with you here. I'm not sure that downvoting questions should instantly fail an audit. We don't have rules about how users can vote, and we don't ordinarily go around micromanaging your voting decisions. As such, I'm not sure why we would try and do it in a review queue. I'm not even sure that vote buttons should be in the queue—the available actions should be editing, commenting, flagging, and deleting. I'm sure there have been endless Meta discussions about this, but I'm far too lazy to go and hunt them down.

Laziness overcome: Thesis: a downvote should never fail a first post audit

In my opinion, the question was broad and unclear (to me, at least).

It might be broad, but I struggle to understand in what way it is unclear. The question presents a quotation from a specific source, and then asks a pointed question to facilitate his understanding/interpretation of that quotation. You don't even have to know what "inheritance" means, or what the "STL" is in order to understand the concept behind this question. "What are the technical problems [as alluded to in the quotation] that precluded the use of x in y?" is a valid question, quite easy to understand. I'm not sure what threw you off here.

Also it lacks research

You're kidding, right? I mean, he cites a specific piece of a longer article (to which he links) that he did not understand. He obviously did research in finding this article, and I give him the benefit of the doubt that he read the article first before asking the question. What more did you want him to do? Answer the question himself? That would kind of defeat the whole point here, wouldn't it?

and doesn't show any attempt by the OP to solve/show what he tried to solve it.

Again, this is absurd. You are making the arguments you'd make if the question had been a copy-paste of a code dump or a homework assignment. Clearly it is not either of those things. "What have you tried?" would not be a reasonable comment on this question, nor is it a reasonable bone to pick with it in a review queue. You know as well as I do what he's tried: he tried to understand the full meaning of the quotation, but even after reading the paper, he didn't understand it because he lacked the relevant context and technical knowledge. So he asked the experts on Stack Overflow. A perfectly valid approach. I understand the impulse to shun the criminally lazy (so do the rest of the C++ experts, trust me, we get tons of homework dumps), but this question simply doesn't fall into that category.

I have to say that I am no expert in C++ but it still struck me as a low quality question upon first seeing it.

Well, I hate to say it, but maybe this is the true problem. Certainly it is the solvable problem. If you see a question in the review queue that is about a language or technology you know little to nothing about, and you aren't sure that you understand the question, then you should skip it. The button is there for a reason. You don't have to review everything, just the things you are qualified for or feel comfortable reviewing. I have already covered why the immediate assumption that it was a low-quality question was erroneous. I can see why you would be uncertain whether it was a good question or just a mediocre one, but that's not at issue in the review queue.

I believe that the question has been automatically inserted as an audit simply because it had a lot of upvotes.

Yes, I am sure that is probably why. It worked: your opinion was at odds with at least 15 members (at the time) of the community. The majority isn't always right, but you haven't made a compelling case here for why they are wrong.

Also there were no answers to the question at that time

Why would this possibly matter? If anything, the lack of answers would prove that it wasn't a bone-headedly stupid or excessively basic question that any moron could answer. Because trust me, those questions get answered.

I also believe that many people failed/will fail this review.

Maybe, I can't say for sure. I believe moderators can check the history for a particular audit to see exactly how many people have failed it. I'm not a moderator, so I can't do that.

Please reconsider this question as an audit.

In my consideration, this was a reasonable question and it belongs on the site. Making a move to either ban it or deem it low-quality was wrong.

  • Thank you for your answer. I won't comment individually on all the clauses but the main part is that up/down votes should not affect review ban. – Idos Feb 28 '16 at 11:27
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    @Idos I did some research and found someone who agrees with you. – Cody Gray Feb 28 '16 at 11:40

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