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The IBM Swift Sandbox is "an interactive website that lets you write Swift code and execute it in a server environment – on top of Linux!"

In the past, questions regarding running Swift on Linux have been tagged with and . Recently, an IBM engineer has introduced the tag on some questions, such as this one. In the case of that question, the asker would experience the same error if they ran their code on IBM's environment, or if they built Swift on their local machine and tried to run their program.

Right now there are only 5 questions with this tag. Why should we be treating questions about IBM's interface any differently than other questions about building and running Swift on Linux?

Is IBM's Swift Sandbox different enough from building and running Swift on any other Linux box that it should have its own tag? If the question is about a specific build or version of Swift the IBM Sandbox is running, there should be no difference between running that version of Swift through IBM's interface vs on a user's own local machine.

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    Technically, the IBM Swift Sandbox could be considered a separate development tool. There might be things about its usage that differ from other Swift development tools on Linux or elsewhere. Doesn't mean it won't suffer from the Xcode problem though. – Brad Larson Feb 25 '16 at 21:12
  • It's a specific swift-playground. Perhaps it should become a synonym? – user4151918 Feb 25 '16 at 21:15
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    @BradLarson So are we treating all web environments as IDEs? Should there be a separate tag for swiftstub.com ? – JAL Feb 25 '16 at 21:16
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    @PetahChristian The IBM Sandbox is not a playground (in the sense that the Xcode Playground works in real time). It compiles and runs a full program like if you ran swift [file.swift] from the command line. – JAL Feb 25 '16 at 21:16
  • @JAL correct, it's not really a playground as Xcode defines the term. We decided to create the tag after the initial bunch of questions that were asking about the Sandbox pretty specifically, such as with errors they were getting. In the future, we're looking to add more features that will hopefully differentiate it from just a normal IDE, like choosing your Swift version to run (including new nightly builds, if we can) and programming challenges. For right now, though, there aren't many issues with the Sandbox that aren't just issues with Linux Swift. – TheSoundDefense Mar 1 '16 at 21:32
  • @TheSoundDefense but the error in this question is not specific to the IBM Swift Sandbox, it's an error that would occur on any Linux machine because the class hasn't been implemented yet. Why should that question have the IBM-specific tag? – JAL Mar 2 '16 at 14:50
  • @JAL well yes, that was ultimately the root cause, but the error message 132 they were getting was specific to the Sandbox. At this time, most Sandbox issues are just Linux Swift issues, but not quite all of them. – TheSoundDefense Mar 2 '16 at 15:23
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Well, it's been almost a week without an official mod answer, so I'm going to go ahead and answer this myself.

I don't think we should have a tag for the specific IBM Sandbox environment for Swift. At the moment, there is little difference between using IBM's environment compared to using the Swift compiler on a Linux machine with a shell and simple text editor. I fear that if we start using this tag, users will be tempted to create and use tags for other online Swift compilers, such as http://swiftstub.com/. I fear that we will start seeing questions that are bug reports (ex: Why does this snippet not run on SwiftStub?), which are not appropriate for Stack Overflow (see Why we're not customer support for [your favorite company]).

If, however, IBM adds additional enhancements that make its sandbox comparable to a programming tool or IDE, then I'd say the tag would be acceptable. But until then, I feel that the and tag combination should be sufficient for questions regarding running Swift on Linux, independent on if the compiler is running on a local machine or web environment.

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