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Stack Overflow routinely suggests to the user questions which the user might find interesting ("related" questions on the right, or the questions suggested when the user types in the title of his own question). Which software is used by Stack Overflow for this purpose (Elasticsearch + Mahout? maybe something else?) I searched on the Internet, but I could not find precise information (apart from a blog entry from 2013 which listed Elasticsearch among software used).

EDIT the question is not duplicate as sustains the group of users who closed the question. Besides of exhibiting a set of "related" questions on the right hand side of the panel (for which the link provided by Cody Gray below gives detailed information), the user who types in the title of a question he wishes to ask, gets a list of suggested questions which might be related. As simple experiment shows, this list has to do with keywords found in the title (appropriately stemmed and weighted), and not with tags (surely not of the question if these are missing). At least in the experiment which I have performed, I have not seen synonims in the list of the questions shown, nor traces of "topic modeling" etc. This hints to me that Elasticsearch (which I know is used by Stack Overflow), is currently the only component used for searching text by Stack Overflow.

Searching on the Internet more, I found the following blog entry from July 2014, which seems to strengthen this conclusion

http://highscalability.com/blog/2014/7/21/stackoverflow-update-560m-pageviews-a-month-25-servers-and-i.html

Among other interesting information, it lists the software components used by Stack Overflow. Although the list may not be full, the only software component listed with searching text capabilities is Elasticsearch.

EDIT I might be confusing search engines with recommendation engines, which perhaps explains downvoting and the reason the question was marked as duplicate.

migrated from stackoverflow.com Feb 25 '16 at 15:02

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