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I want to say that Stack Overflow is a well-guarded site, with little or absolutely no security flaws. However winning points can be easy here. For a test purpose I created another account. I asked a question from my recently created account and logged out from there. I than logged into my original (current) account and answered the question myself. I then gave it an upvote and marked it as accepted from my other account. Bingo! I had enough reputation points in just minutes! Like this, I can get 2000+ reputation points within 15 days (as we have up-voting limits as stated here:-)

Will my account be banned if I upvote too much for the same IP address?

This is unfair for people who had earned their reputation by spending hours and sometimes even days. Is there a way to fix this, maybe a one-account-per-IP address solve this?

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  • 5
    What happens when people use Stack Overflow from work/school/university/coffee shop, where the IP address is shared?
    – Oded
    Feb 25 '16 at 12:36
  • 4
    Voting fraud, as you described, is not allowed. Moderators have tools to find such voting irregularities and take appropriate actions.
    – Oded
    Feb 25 '16 at 12:37
  • 7
    @Oded One account per coffeeshop, obviously.
    – miradulo
    Feb 25 '16 at 12:37
  • @oded thats why I started this discussion maybe find another solution?
    – Mr.Helpy
    Feb 25 '16 at 12:38
  • 16
    We already have a solution. Try getting your +2000 rep and see what happens ;)
    – Oded
    Feb 25 '16 at 12:38
  • @Oded Can you share that soution with us?
    – Mr.Helpy
    Feb 25 '16 at 12:39
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    Nope, I will not delete something that has upvoted answers. Not without a compelling reason (given people put effort into it and that is has use for the community).
    – Oded
    Feb 25 '16 at 12:43
  • 1
    @Mr.Helpy If it's because of the downvotes, don't worry too much. Downvotes on Meta mean disagreement. People oppose the feature request, but your post is still useful - it shows us something the community decides against.
    – S.L. Barth
    Feb 25 '16 at 12:46
  • 1
    Yes I already did, Thanks for your concern though.
    – Mr.Helpy
    Feb 25 '16 at 12:53
  • 3
    I got a kick out of the fake conversation between your sock and yourself in order to raise the credibility. Looks like you had fun.
    – miradulo
    Feb 25 '16 at 12:56
  • 3
    How do you know he downvoted you, last time I checked votes were anonymous... Feb 25 '16 at 13:00
  • 3
    How do you know I didn't downvote you? I was just reading your question and mediocre answer... Feb 25 '16 at 13:02
  • 5
    @Mr.Helpy I've taken the liberty of removing your "test account" - I'd advise not trying this "test" again - it could lead to your current account being suspended - thanks.
    – Jon Clements Mod
    Feb 25 '16 at 13:31
  • 1
    Stack Exchange is way smarter then you think. Gaming anything here is really hard and easily detected. The have backend logic to detect many a kind of tomfoolery. If you thought about trying something like it, you'll find that the moderators often respond quickly and decisively.
    – Magisch
    Feb 25 '16 at 14:07
  • 2
    A lesson that several people who asked a question on meta this week should learn is: ask on meta before you act on SO :) Its free!
    – Gimby
    Feb 25 '16 at 15:09
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As was pointed out in the comments, this would place too much of a restriction on places that share IP addresses, like universities.

There are systems in place to detect voting fraud, and they're pretty good. The precise mechanisms of these are secret, to prevent people from dodging them.

As a little anecdotal evidence, there was a user on Security Stack Exchange who had tried out the system's defenses. That user told us he'd accessed the site via TOR. He also consistently used the different accounts from different computers, to avoid identification via browser fingerprinting. And still the voting fraud detection scripts got him.

1
  • Probably the scripts detect the tor users, and handle them with particular "attention". As far I know, even the mods can see, who is from tor, since many years. I think the system can be tricked, with many accounts, all from tor, generating non-trivial, misleading voting patterns. But doing this "correctly" requires more work as getting the same rep on a legal way.
    – peterh
    Oct 11 '17 at 1:06
9

Is there a way to fix this

Yes, the voting fraud detection script will catch you, you will lose the gained reputation and possibly be banned for some time... That script works very well. For other cases, moderators have the tools to detect such fraud. Those scripts include checks for the same IP address, I am sure of that, even if the working of the script is kept a secret.

maybe a one-account-per-ip solve this?

No, what about work places, schools or other public places like a library. Some colleagues of mine are active on Stack Overflow too, and I don't think it is considered useful we have to share one account.

1
  • I think if there is a catch (-> the SE reveals the info that they could detect that attack type), then there is already a punishment, too.
    – peterh
    Oct 11 '17 at 1:22

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