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With some years of experience in a community of users and developers of an API and application, I've seen reoccurring questions and common pain points.

For some reason, many users prefer to comment on forums or ask in chat rooms, but not Stack Exchange (even when prompted).

In some cases I would like to answer on Stack Exchange and link users there when the question comes up again.

In general I'm not so keen on this - the motivation is contrived and if someone asks why you need the solution you can't always give a real answer... having said that:

Is it reasonable/acceptable to ask a question on behalf someone else?

And what is the etiquette here?

  • Should the initial question clearly state that this is being asked on behalf of others?
  • Should the original question be linked to? (forum or mailing list thread for example)
  • Should a note be added to the question that the author intends to write an answer?

Note, this is a related question, but I think mine is different enough. Tried to add a self-answered wiki-post, but just got downvotes

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  • "Should a note be added to the question that the author intends to write an answer?" - if you're self-answering, you can post them both at the same time.
    – jonrsharpe
    Feb 25 '16 at 7:40
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    We only care about the question, not who asked it. We don't want to have to look somewhere else, Google isn't going to do that either when it indexes the Q+A. The problem with this approach is that the OP is not up to speed on the real problem and can't usually quickly follow-up on comments that ask for clarification. Also basically what went wrong with your self-answer Q+A, the question was hopelessly broad and missed all the "How to ask" guidelines. Consider a blog. Feb 25 '16 at 8:36
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Should the initial question clearly state that this is being asked on behalf of others?

No.

Should the original question be linked to? (forum or mailing list thread for eg)

If it adds useful and relevant information to the question, go for it. But if you think you can encapsulate the whole question in the post itself with all the necessarily details, there's no problem with that.

Should a note be added to the question that the author intends to write an answer?

Why would it be useful? I don't think it's relevant.


Question's origin shouldn't make a difference. As long as the question is clear, we don't really care where did it come from if it helps the community.

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I haven't been around here as long as most people, but based on SO's mission statement (to serve as a repository of useful questions and answers), there is absolutely no reason why you shouldn't.

Obviously, make sure that you can explain the problem fully and that you can answer any questions that may come up about it. If you have enough experience to answer the question (as your post implies that you intend to self-answer), you probably can ask the question in a better and more useful manner than the original anyways.

I see no reason why you need to clarify that you intend to write an answer, as self-answering is encouraged and accepted. Other authors have asked and self-answered questions that they simply want to get added to the repository. As long as it's a good question, there is no reason not to do it.

If the original source is useful (or has any rights restrictions where linking would be required), link to it. Otherwise there is no reason to, as long as you get all the relevant info into the question.

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Why wouldn't it be okay?

If it's a good question that adds value to the site, go for it!
Just make sure you check for duplicates, first.

Also, keep in mind that you may need to answer questions users have about the question. If you're familiar enough with the problem, I don't see a problem.

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