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I recently asked a question involving the 'Too Broad' tag (How to ask questions about complex systems without being too broad?), and how the rules regarding broadness are implemented in practice. I quickly received a solid, sensible, unambiguous answer, that is not at all reflected by the tag's description. The high number of Meta questions about what 'too broad' means and the seemingly common behavior of using 'too broad' as a sort of catch-all (see Is the Too Broad Flag being used Too Broadly?, Is it acceptable to use "Too broad" as a substitute close reason for zero effort questions? etc) suggest to me that the description could use a rewrite.

Looking at how the tag is used, I would propose a new, less broad description incorporating the following things:

  • For people with specific problems asking general questions, a clearer suggestion to rewrite the question as about the specific problem. The current wording is confusing, uses far more syllables than it needs, and prompts the asker to narrow their question when it should probably prompt them to rethink it completely.

  • For people asking general questions, a suggestion that they explore other resources (documentation, google, etc) and not ask here unless they have a specific issue.

  • For onlookers, wondering why this question is too broad but that one isn't, some indication that question scope, rather than answer scope, is the main indicator of broadness (i.e., while Why is it faster to process a sorted array than an unsorted array? has an answer with an immensely broad scope of necessity, the question itself deals with an apparently specific and narrow problem)

For reference, the current description of 'Too Broad' is:

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.

I would suggest a description something like this:

This question is about a topic too broad for this site. If you have a specific problem or question related to this topic, consider asking about it. If not, consider doing more research before asking again.

Thoughts?

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    voting is different on meta... – rene Feb 23 '16 at 19:59
  • @P... ^ So many users disagree, that the text should be changed. You should probably better point out why you think your proposal is a real improvement. – πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 23 '16 at 20:00
  • I don't see how your suggestion is a marked improvement over the current text. The current text is admittedly a bit harder to parse, but it captures the essence of what is "too broad" and tries to provide an actual explanation of what it means. The recommendations given in your text are fine ("do more research" etc.), but they are already presented to new users several times during the signup and question asking process – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Feb 23 '16 at 20:01
  • @rene I know, my point is that people are disagreeing and not saying why. - edit - no longer the case, while I was typing this. – P... Feb 23 '16 at 20:01
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    They don't have to say why, if they aren't currently inclined to write out an answer (although it is nice when someone does, of course.) – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Feb 23 '16 at 20:01
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    @P... Just showing disagreement isn't enough here for a feature-request? – πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 23 '16 at 20:02
  • @πάντα ῥεῖ It's always nice to know why, so I can better judge how I can improve my suggestions. – P... Feb 23 '16 at 20:02
  • @Pekka웃 Do you think my text is in any way worse? Even if it is only a small gain in readability, isn't any positive change worth making? And while you are correct that these recommendations are presented to new users during signup and asking, the fact that 'too broad' questions keep popping up suggests to me that another reminder couldn't hurt. As a question asker, a note on exactly why and how you messed up this time will always be more helpful than just a list of rules. – P... Feb 23 '16 at 20:05
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    Closed as too broad by X, Z, Y: This question is about a topic too broad for this site. I used to read documentation that was just like that. Repeating the concept you want to explain does not help. – Frédéric Hamidi Feb 23 '16 at 20:08
  • @πάντα ῥεῖ sorry, didn't see your edit until now. Serious question: I put this as a feature-request because it seemed to fit the subject best. Does the feature-request tag imply that there will be no discussion? – P... Feb 23 '16 at 20:08
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    @FrédéricHamidi The first rule of tautology club is the first rule of tautology club? :D – Patrice Feb 23 '16 at 20:12
  • @FrédéricHamidi In my mind at least, 'question about a topic too broad' is slightly more specific than 'question is too broad'. Though I may have accidentally suggested otherwise by my tag choice, I'd intended my example less as 'hey, let's make this the new description' and more as 'hey, let's come up with a new description, here's a rough draft'. – P... Feb 23 '16 at 20:15
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    Your suggestion makes it more easy to read, but it does take away crucial information. I'm not convinced that's an improvement overall (although I don't disagree that it's not completely easy to understand at the moment) – Pekka supports GoFundMonica Feb 23 '16 at 20:24
  • @Pekka 웃 thank you for the clarification. I would disagree that the current description supplies that information, but I guess most people here disagree with me. – P... Feb 23 '16 at 20:28
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    I don't particularly like the wording you proposed because it'd be a bit wierd to see a question tagged <insert programming language> closed as "this question is about a topic too broad for this site." – Kevin B Feb 23 '16 at 20:52
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From my comment on your previous question about your question:

You asked a reasonable question; the problem is that high-quality answers are going to be long and complicated. Short "Yes, to a first approximation, but here's an example where GCC gets the loop control right but the loop body math wrong" answers may technically answer the question, but they don't get to the heart of what you're asking. The questions you cite [as examples of well-received questions] are based around explanation of a specific example, limiting the scope of their answers (at the cost that the answers may not generalize beyond the example).

This matches the current close reason text:

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.

That tells you what's wrong and what you can do about it. It's terse, as generic messages tend to be, but if you read it seriously, you know where to start.

In contrast, your proposed revision to the close reason text is less helpful:

This question is about a topic too broad for this site. If you have a specific problem or question related to this topic, consider asking about it. If not, consider doing more research before asking again.

The first sentence just repeats the name of the close reason. It also misattributes the problem to the topic instead of the question; as you saw with your question, some performance questions are too broad and others are not. A user reading this message would be just as confused as you were when you came to meta -- "Why was my question closed when other questions about [topic] are still open?".

The second sentence suggests getting "specific", while the current close reason's second sentence has more, well, specific instructions about being specific. We don't want users dumping more backstory into their question if it doesn't help narrow it down.

The third sentence would not have helped you in your case: you seemed to have done enough research to form a coherent (if somewhat naive) theory about performance. In general, users asking researched but broad questions like yours don't know what further research they could do (or they'd do it and find an answer).

In short, the current close reason text does a better job of explaining what's wrong with the question and what can be done to fix it than your proposed revision.

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