-5

I work in a somewhat obscure language called the Progress ABL, and answered a question about how to use a function in the language. Another user created an answer to the same question and added some functionality while they were at it by adding a parameter to the function like so:

function fcustomer returns character ( input p1 as character ) forward.
put unformatted fcustomer(). /*line one*/
function fcustomer returns character ( input p1 as character ):

The first and last lines specify that the function has a parameter. The function call in the middle, however, does not specify a parameter. That condition is illegal in the ABL, so I changed the middle line so it would have a parameter like so:

put unformatted fcustomer("parm"). /*line one*/

so that it will work if someone were to cut 'n' paste this code into a dev environment. I also documented the reason in the comments:

Comment: The author of this answer added a parameter to 
the function specification but not to the call. This edit adds 
a parameter value to the function call so the code will actually 
work if it is run.

The reviewers, however, didn't agree with me, and rejected my change: https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/11367233

All I can think is that they're not experienced in this language, didn't read the comment, and think that a mis-matched function signature is legal. The rejection reasons are factually incorrect, and while I could easily write the author to get this changed, I shouldn't have to when there's a usable editing process that failed - twice! - and needs to be fixed.

UPDATE:

Based on discussions here I've made a feature request to support a workflow for code and technical changes to a post. https://meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/317499/process-for-allowing-code-changes-and-technical-edits

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  • -1? Really? Got to wonder about the quality of some of the people here.
    – Tim Kuehn
    Feb 23 '16 at 5:56
  • 13
    Hmm, let's not wonder about the quality of the people. A downvote just suggests that their opinion differs from yours. They disagree that you made a correct edit and/or they think that rejection was the appropriate course of action. Meta doesn't affect your reputation on the main site, so voting is a quick, convenient, and noiseless way for people to express their opinions.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Feb 23 '16 at 6:34
  • Yes it is frustrating when you try to mold SO to your standards - it won't budge. Try to keep an open mind when things happen, as more often than not frustration is the only thing that is wrong in the picture.
    – Gimby
    Feb 23 '16 at 9:11
  • I review suggested edits nearly every day. I would have rejected yours too. Why? I have no idea what that language is and thus no way of judging wether or not your edit makes any sense, and even then, it still should have been a comment instead.
    – magisch
    Feb 23 '16 at 10:43
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    Magisch - if someone didn't know the language then they should pass on reviewing the edit.
    – Tim Kuehn
    Feb 23 '16 at 12:22
  • 2
    @TimKuehn nope. That's not how editing review works. That is also why normally it is told to not edit the code in a question. If there is something wrong with the code, comment and tell the guy who posted the answer, so he can correct it himself. That`s not a "correct" edit, and it should've been rejected
    – Patrice
    Feb 23 '16 at 12:43
  • @Patrice - you're basically saying that reviewers who have no knowledge of a language are qualified to pass judgement on edits, will reject code changes out of hand regardless of quality while allowing possible non-code changes that may or not be good. This sets a double standard - the editor could be wrong about the non-code changes as well, which means that code changes that fix a problem are rejected out of hand while incorrect non-code changes can get a pass.
    – Tim Kuehn
    Feb 23 '16 at 13:23
  • 3
    @TimKuehn what I'm saying is that, whether you know the language or not, WE DO NOT CHANGE CODE IN EDITS. That takes it away from the equation. stackoverflow.com/help/privileges/edit Nowhere does it talk about changing code.
    – Patrice
    Feb 23 '16 at 13:25
  • @Patrice - no, that just means that this double-standard is embedded in SO policies which makes it an issue with the institution itself.
    – Tim Kuehn
    Feb 23 '16 at 13:27
  • 1
    @TimKuehn And what is wrong with posting your own answer if his is incorrect? Or posting a comment to his answer so he can do his own edit if you're right?
    – Patrice
    Feb 23 '16 at 13:28
  • I did post an answer to that question. The answer I was editing took the OP's question and answered it differently. WRT making a comment - why when I could just fix the code in question. I'm thinking if code edits are such a concern, then make the post author part of the review process when needed - such as cases like code edits. This'll allow for editing code, and ensure that the resulting edits meet with the author's approval of intent, etc.
    – Tim Kuehn
    Feb 23 '16 at 13:32
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    @TimKuehn see... I would vote for that feature request.
    – Patrice
    Feb 23 '16 at 13:38
12

All I can think is that they're not experienced in this language, didn't read the comment, and think that a mis-matched function signature is legal.

Of course the reviewers of a suggested edit are not experienced in the language. You cannot expect them to be. You couldn't even expect them to be if the language was something commonplace, like C# or C++, but you even admit yourself that the Progress ABL is a "somewhat obscure language." If that's true, we probably have very few reviewers with experience in that language.

I don't know if they read your edit comment or not. No one can say except those three people. But you are basically asking that they just take your word for it. What if you're wrong? We've established they aren't experts in the language, so how are they to judge the technical veracity of your edit? Likewise, how do they know that you are an expert in the language? Do you expect them to go to your profile, look and see what questions you've answered, and conclude that you "probably" know what you're doing? That would be an awful lot to ask, and no one has the time for that. The reviewers made a much faster judgment at the expense of accuracy: they determined that you are probably not a trusted expert, since you don't have the necessary reputation to edit answers without review. This is how the website assesses skill level. It is admittedly weak and inaccurate, but it is all that we have.

The bottom line is that you cannot make edits like this that change code in an answer unless you have full editing privileges. That establishes your credibility and trustworthiness for doing so. Otherwise, you're subject to the verdict of three arbitrary users who are guaranteed only to be experienced with how Stack Overflow operates, and not specifically with the language/technology in question.

When you accumulate enough reputation and are able to spend some time reviewing suggested edits yourself, you will see why we cannot simply assume that all edits are technically correct. A large percentage of them are wrong, worthless, or downright spammy. Giving the benefit of the doubt is far too costly. If it looks like a bad edit, it is and should be rejected.

It is worth noting that the rejection reason they gave is one of the canned reasons. It is not meant as a slight to your knowledge or effort; please do not take it personally. None of the users typed it in specifically for your edit.

It is, however, good advice:

This edit was intended to address the author of the post and makes no sense as an edit. It should have been written as a comment or an answer.

Until you have earned full editing privileges, you would probably be better off leaving a comment that suggests fixes for the code. Alternatively, if the code is extremely problematic or represents a common mistake/misunderstanding, posting a new answer of your own that explains the problems.

And even for those with full editing privileges, the community is still divided on whether or not editing code in answers is acceptable.

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  • 1
    The thought that reviewers who know nothing about a language have rights to approve / disapprove an edit is rather mind boggling.
    – Tim Kuehn
    Feb 23 '16 at 13:12
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    You are misunderstanding the feature. Suggested edits are a way to get quick grammar and formatting fixes in place, and also to serve as "training wheels" for budding editors. If technical review was required, it would take forever to get edits approved and we might as well not have them. What is more, there are still many people who feel that making substantive edits to code is verboten, even for those with full edit privileges. That happens not to be my opinion (in fact I disagree rather strongly with it), but even I admit there is just no way reviewers can be expected to deal with these.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Feb 23 '16 at 13:25
  • In which case I'm thinking that the author of the post in question should be part of the review process and approve / disapprove of code changes. It would certainly make more sense compared to compelling fixes to be posted in the comments.
    – Tim Kuehn
    Feb 23 '16 at 13:29
  • Well, they are. But they are not the only person who can review. Lots of people are not active on the site 24 hours a day. And, in general, the expertise is not required. The overwhelming majority of useful suggested edits just fix formatting or spelling/grammar mistakes. There is no reason to wait around for the original poster to approve those. In many cases, they are not even the best person to approve them because they don't know the site's rules—lots of edits remove noise like "hello" and "thanks in advance," and the post author is the one who put those in in the first place.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Feb 23 '16 at 13:31
  • There is just no "I'm making a technical edit, and I know what I'm doing, so force this to be reviewed by the post author or subject experts" flag. It doesn't scale. The escape hatch is obtaining full editing privileges.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Feb 23 '16 at 13:32
  • Good grief - I'm not saying make the post author part of all review edits, just the ones that reviewers think need it - like code changes.
    – Tim Kuehn
    Feb 23 '16 at 13:33
  • @CodyGray The guidelines have made it very clear that edits are not for substantive changes to the content of a post, even with full editing privileges. You can disagree with whether or not that's a good idea, but it is the site's policy, that's not really something you can disagree with.
    – Servy
    Feb 23 '16 at 16:06
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    @Servy What guidelines? The comments page still says that "comments are not recommended for...suggesting corrections that don't fundamentally change the meaning of the post" (fixing a minor error in code doesn't do that), and the editing page doesn't say "you cannot edit code." I haven't found any official policy, just a bunch of nonsense assumptions that code is somehow more sacred than words. If anything, the opposite is true, but both are anathema to site that uses wiki-style collaborative edits.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Feb 23 '16 at 16:09
  • To be clear, I am not advocating edits that change the meaning of an answer. A typographical error in a function signature is in keeping with the author's intent, surely.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Feb 23 '16 at 16:10
  • @CodyGray I never said, "You cannot edit code". I said that, even with editing privileges, you shouldn't be making substantive changes to the content of the post. Fixing a small typo in the code, a minor syntax error, a mis-spelled varaible name, etc. are all cases where you can edit code while clearly maintaining the author's intent. But the point is still maintaining the author's intent and not adding new original content.
    – Servy
    Feb 23 '16 at 16:11
  • Oh, cool. So you're just saying what I already said. Glad we got that settled. Not sure where you misinterpreted my answer as saying, "when you get full editing privileges, go hog wild and make edits that disrespect the author's intent." We were talking about edits that can be judged on non-technical merits (i.e., formatting and spelling/grammar), and technical fixes that are still minor and in keeping with the author's intent.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Feb 23 '16 at 16:12
  • When you said, "substantive" in the following quote "many people who feel that making substantive edits to code is verboten, even for those with full edit privileges. That happens not to be my opinion" I assumed you meant more than just fixing a typo in a variable name or a syntax error where the original intention of the author was clear. I don't consider those types of edits "substantive", but if that's what you meant by it, then yes, we agree.
    – Servy
    Feb 23 '16 at 16:16
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All I can think is that they're not experienced in this language, didn't read the comment, and think that a mis-matched function signature is legal.

That is pretty likely the case, especially for the more obscure tags. Generally, however, edits that seem to alter code beyond formatting (especially if it seems like a significant change) will likely get rejected for the exact reason yours was. Most people would see that correcting a code error should be a comment, rather than changing the post itself.

1
  • "Most people would see that correcting a code error should be a comment, rather than changing the post itself." This is, IMO, the only good answer here.
    – Cerbrus
    Feb 23 '16 at 7:18

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